The best, hand-picked video films from across China that cover everything from travel (trip and guide), to Chinese culture (music, language, philosophy, etc., both traditional and contemporary). Most videos are by independent videographers from around the world and encompass a variety of film-making styles. Welcome to your window on China ...

With over 6,000 years of civilisation, combined with an unparalleled embrace of modernity, China is the country most steeped in the philosophies of individual freedom, and of harmony and balance, and still the most exciting place on Earth. Not just a nation state, but a civilisation state. Find out more, with BeijingBuzzz ...

If you were to watch these videos for 8 hours a day, it would take about 60 days to see them all. Which is why we have a video search and tags :)

This is China uncensored - the real China. The very best, hand-picked videos ...

China combines ancient cultural wisdom and architecture with an embrace of modernity and a passion for making life more beautiful. Harmony between human and nature is a core guiding principle; one sees this in the classical Chinese garden (and local park) and the Chinese love for mountains and hiking.

The timeless allure of this unique society is further enhanced by the nuances of 56 ethnic groups and the diverse environments encompassed, from snow-clad moutains to rainforest, to desert, to grassland, to karst peaks and rice terraces, and more.

Whether you're planning a trip or an armchair traveller, doing business with China or an expat, the videos here can help you on life's journey ...

China - not just a country - but a civilization.

Chinese Culture - a selection of vloggers latest posts, with a focus on traditional / countryside arts, crafts, farming and cooking.

China Travel - independent film-makers show the real China.

 

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Favorite Videos

HanFu in SuZhou, with FunFancie – don’t miss it. JiangSu province.
JiangSu province.
A trip to GuangXi 广西 and SiChuan 四川 provinces. Two films by ryzdon - LongSheng (Dragon`s Backbone) Rice Terraces, GuangXi province, and LeShan Giant Buddha, Mount Emei Scenic Area, SiChuan province ...
Two films by ryzdon - LongSheng (Dragon`s Backbone) Rice Terraces, GuangXi province, and LeShan Giant Buddha, Mount Emei Scenic Area, SiChuan province ...
Explore beautiful XinJiang 新疆 province …. An awesome film - don`t miss it ...    September trip, in 2017; charming couple.    XinJiang, north west China, includes the Tien Shan and Kunlun Shan mountains, the Taklimakan Desert, and the Tarim Basin.
An awesome film - don`t miss it ... September trip, in 2017; charming couple. XinJiang, north west China, includes the Tien Shan and Kunlun Shan mountains, the Taklimakan Desert, and the Tarim Basin.
Beautiful moments in SanYa 三亚. HaiNan Island, south China        Bonus film - `DIY Wedding Photos`, in LiJiang 丽江, a micro movie 浪漫的旅拍婚紗影像 ...        Such a lovely couple; best wishes on your life together - it sure will be a lot of fun ...    The song is from the 2007 film `Music and Lyrics`, sung by Hugh Grant and Haley Bennett.    如此有趣和美丽 !
HaiNan Island, south China Bonus film - `DIY Wedding Photos`, in LiJiang 丽江, a micro movie 浪漫的旅拍婚紗影像 ... Such a lovely couple; best wishes on your life together - it sure will be a lot of fun ... The song is from the 2007 film `Music and Lyrics`, sung by Hugh Grant and Haley Bennett. 如此有趣和美丽 !
This is beautiful ShanXi 山西 province …. ShānXī province lies to the west / south-west of HeBei and BeiJing. The capital is TaiYuan.    This film focuses on the plethora of impressive ancient sites and natural wonders; these include :    * JinCi Temple 25 kilometers (16 miles) south west of TaiYuan, noted for its Song dynasty paintings and architecture. Founded about 1,400 years ago and expanded during the following centuries, this site has a diverse collection of more than 100 sculptures, buildings, terraces and bridges.    * The Ancient City of PingYao is a UNESCO World Heritage Site near TaiYuan. Once a great financial center of China, it is noted for its preservation of many features of northern Han Chinese culture, architecture and way of life during the Ming and Qing dynasties.    * The YunGang Grottoes, its literal translation being the Cloud Ridge Caves, are shallow caves near DaTong. There are over 50,000 carved images and statues of Buddhas and Boddhisatvas within these grottoes, ranging from 4 centimeters to 7 meters tall. This UNESCO World Heritage Site consists of 252 caves noted for their collection of 5th and 6th century Buddhist grotto sculptures and reliefs.    * Mount WuTai Shan is the highest point in the province. It is known as the residence of the bodhisattva Manjusri, and as a result is also a major Buddhist pilgrimage destination, with many temples and natural sights. Points of interest include Tang Dynasty (618−907) era timber halls located at NanChan Temple and FoGuang Temple, as well as a giant white stupa at TaYuan Temple built during the Ming Dynasty (1368−1644).    * Mount HengShan, one of the `Five Great Peaks` of China, is also a major Taoist site.    * The Hanging Temple (XuanKong Temple) is located on the side of a cliff, 75 meters (245 feet) up, and has survived for 1400 years despite earthquakes in the area.    * The Pagoda of FoGong Temple built in 1056 during the Liao dynasty. It is octagonal with nine levels (five are visible from outside), and at 67 meters (220 feet) in height, it is currently the tallest wooden pagoda in the world and also the oldest fully wooden pagoda in China.    * HuKou Waterfall on the Yellow River. At 50 meters high it is the second highest waterfall in China.    ~~~ A very beautiful film - don`t miss it ...    A veritable masterclass in video shooting, storytelling, editing and sound mixing.
ShānXī province lies to the west / south-west of HeBei and BeiJing. The capital is TaiYuan. This film focuses on the plethora of impressive ancient sites and natural wonders; these include : * JinCi Temple 25 kilometers (16 miles) south west of TaiYuan, noted for its Song dynasty paintings and architecture. Founded about 1,400 years ago and expanded during the following centuries, this site has a diverse collection of more than 100 sculptures, buildings, terraces and bridges. * The Ancient City of PingYao is a UNESCO World Heritage Site near TaiYuan. Once a great financial center of China, it is noted for its preservation of many features of northern Han Chinese culture, architecture and way of life during the Ming and Qing dynasties. * The YunGang Grottoes, its literal translation being the Cloud Ridge Caves, are shallow caves near DaTong. There are over 50,000 carved images and statues of Buddhas and Boddhisatvas within these grottoes, ranging from 4 centimeters to 7 meters tall. This UNESCO World Heritage Site consists of 252 caves noted for their collection of 5th and 6th century Buddhist grotto sculptures and reliefs. * Mount WuTai Shan is the highest point in the province. It is known as the residence of the bodhisattva Manjusri, and as a result is also a major Buddhist pilgrimage destination, with many temples and natural sights. Points of interest include Tang Dynasty (618−907) era timber halls located at NanChan Temple and FoGuang Temple, as well as a giant white stupa at TaYuan Temple built during the Ming Dynasty (1368−1644). * Mount HengShan, one of the `Five Great Peaks` of China, is also a major Taoist site. * The Hanging Temple (XuanKong Temple) is located on the side of a cliff, 75 meters (245 feet) up, and has survived for 1400 years despite earthquakes in the area. * The Pagoda of FoGong Temple built in 1056 during the Liao dynasty. It is octagonal with nine levels (five are visible from outside), and at 67 meters (220 feet) in height, it is currently the tallest wooden pagoda in the world and also the oldest fully wooden pagoda in China. * HuKou Waterfall on the Yellow River. At 50 meters high it is the second highest waterfall in China. ~~~ A very beautiful film - don`t miss it ... A veritable masterclass in video shooting, storytelling, editing and sound mixing.
Here is ShangHai 上海. Sweeping scenes ...
Sweeping scenes ...
The sound of China 中国 …  Don’t miss it !. The amazing panoply of sights and sounds that is the incredibly diverse and both naturally and culturally beautiful country that makes it a travel destination top pick.    With Cee-Roo ...
The amazing panoply of sights and sounds that is the incredibly diverse and both naturally and culturally beautiful country that makes it a travel destination top pick. With Cee-Roo ...
An introduction to China. With Nation Nibbles ...        With BRIGHT SIDE ...
With Nation Nibbles ... With BRIGHT SIDE ...
21 amazing days in China …. With ClaireTrips ...
With ClaireTrips ...
The beauty of HangZhou 杭州 …. Hángzhōu lies in ZheJiang province
Hángzhōu lies in ZheJiang province
The awesome Harbin Snow and Ice Festival, HeiLongJiang province. With Seiu Travel ...
With Seiu Travel ...
Discover ShanXi 山西 province ... ShanXi province lies west / south west of BeiJing / HeBei.  Best known places include PingYao, the YunGang Grottoes and JinCi Temple. ShanXi is packed with ancient Chinese culture.
ShanXi province lies west / south west of BeiJing / HeBei. Best known places include PingYao, the YunGang Grottoes and JinCi Temple. ShanXi is packed with ancient Chinese culture.

City Guides

Overview ChengDu (成都) is the capital city of SiChuan province in south-west China. Known for its spicy cuisine, relaxed lifestyle, and panda conservation centers, ChengDu offers a unique blend of modernity and tradition. Top Attractions Chengdu Research Base of Giant Panda Breeding (成都大熊猫繁育研究基地) - Chéngdū Dàxióngmāo Fányù Yánjiū Jīdì Jinli Ancient Street (锦里古街) - Jǐnlǐ Gǔjiē Wuhou Shrine (武侯祠) - Wǔhóu Cí Qingcheng Mountain (青城山) - Qīngchéng Shān Dujiangyan Irrigation System (都江堰) - Dūjiāngyàn Wide and Narrow Alleys (Kuanzhai Alley) (宽窄巷子) - Kuānzhǎi Xiàngzi Sichuan Opera and Face Changing Show (川剧变脸) - Chuānjù Biànliǎn Chengdu People`s Park (成都人民公园) - Chéngdū Rénmín Gōngyuán Chunxi Road (春熙路) - Chūnxī Lù Song Xian Qiao Antique Market (宋庆龄故居松仙桥古玩市场) - Sòng Qìnglíng Gùjū Sōngxiānqiáo Gǔwàn Shìchǎng Wenshu Monastery (文殊院) - Wénshū Yuàn Mt. Emei (峨眉山) - Éméi Shān (Day trip from Chengdu) Dining Experiences Hot Pot (火锅) - Huǒguō Sichuan Cuisine (川菜) - Chuāncài Tea Houses (茶馆) - Cháguǎn Huangcheng Laoma (Old Master Huang`s Restaurant) (黄城老妈) - Huángchéng Lǎomā Yulin Life Plaza Food Street (玉林生活广场美食街) - Yùlín Shēnghuó Guǎngchǎng Měishí Jiē Long Chaoshou Restaurant (Dragon`s Wonton Restaurant) (龙抄手) - Lóng Chāoshǒu Shopping and Entertainment Chunxi Road Shopping District (春熙路购物区) - Chūnxī Lù Gòuwù Qū Taikoo Li (太古里) - Tàigǔlǐ IFS (International Finance Square) (国际金融中心) - Guójì Jīnróng Zhōngxīn Sichuan Opera and Tea Culture Show (川剧茶艺表演) - Chuānjù Cháyì Biǎoyǎn Chengdu Global Center (成都环球中心) - Chéngdū Huánqiú Zhōngxīn Chengdu IFS Ice Fountain (IFS冰雪奇缘) - IFS Bīngxuě Qíyuán Chengdu New Century Global Center (成都世纪环球中心) - Chéngdū Shìjì Huánqiú Zhōngxīn Tianfu New Area (天府新区) - Tiānfǔ Xīn Qū. Tianfu New Area is a rapidly developing region known for its modern architecture, innovative industries, and urban planning. Nightlife and Entertainment Wide and Narrow Alleys (Kuanzhai Alley) (宽窄巷子) - Kuānzhǎi Xiàngzi Jiuyanqiao Bar Street (九眼桥酒吧街) - Jiǔyǎnqiáo Jiǔbā Jiē Lan Kwai Fong Chengdu (成都兰桂坊) - Chéngdū Lánguìfāng Heming Teahouse (Hemingway Bar) (海明茶馆) - Hǎimíng Cháguǎn Chengdu Sino-Ocean Taikoo Li (成都远洋太古里) - Chéngdū Yuǎnyáng Tàigǔlǐ Practical Tips Transportation: Use the Chengdu metro system, buses, or taxis for getting around. Language: Mandarin is the primary language; learn some basic phrases. Weather: Chengdu has a mild climate, but prepare for occasional rain, especially in summer. Currency: Use local currency (Renminbi). Panda Visits: Plan your visit to the panda base early in the morning for the best panda viewing. Respect Local Customs: Embrace the laid-back lifestyle and tea culture of Chengdu. Hidden Gems Chengdu Culture Park (成都文化公园) - Chéngdū Wénhuà Gōngyuán Chengdu Panda Asian Food Festival (成都国际熊猫美食节) - Chéngdū Guójì Xióngmāo Měishí Jié Anshun Bridge Night Market (安顺廊桥夜市) - Ānshùn Lángqiáo Yèshì Enjoy exploring Chengdu`s rich culture, delicious cuisine, and the adorable giant pandas!
Welcome to Hong Kong! Explore the vibrant city of Hong Kong, where East meets West in a dazzling fusion of culture, cuisine, and modernity. From towering skyscrapers to tranquil islands, Hong Kong offers a captivating experience. About Hong Kong Hong Kong is a dynamic city known for its stunning skyline, bustling street markets, and picturesque harbor. As a Special Administrative Region of China, Hong Kong has its own unique blend of Chinese and Western influences. Key features of Hong Kong include its vibrant nightlife, world-class dining scene, and diverse shopping options. Top Attractions Victoria Peak: Ride the Peak Tram for panoramic views of Hong Kong`s skyline. Star Ferry: Take a scenic ride across Victoria Harbour between Hong Kong Island and Kowloon. Ngong Ping 360: Visit Lantau Island and see the Tian Tan Buddha statue. Temple Street Night Market: Explore this lively market for street food, souvenirs, and bargain shopping. Victoria Harbour Light Show: Watch the Symphony of Lights show illuminating Hong Kong`s skyscrapers. Ocean Park: Enjoy thrilling rides and see marine life at this popular amusement park. Stanley Market: Visit this waterfront market for arts, crafts, and seaside dining. Wong Tai Sin Temple: Experience traditional Chinese architecture and visit a popular Taoist temple. Hong Kong Disneyland: Discover magical attractions and meet Disney characters. Culture and History Hong Kong`s culture is a blend of ancient traditions and modern influences. Chinese Festivals: Experience traditional festivals like Chinese New Year and Mid-Autumn Festival. Colonial Heritage: Explore historic sites such as the Former British Consulate and Western District Public Cargo Working Area. Lamma Island: Escape to this laid-back island with hiking trails and seafood restaurants. Hong Kong Heritage Museum: Learn about the city`s history, art, and culture through exhibitions. Dining in Hong Kong Hong Kong is a food lover`s paradise, offering a wide range of culinary delights. Dim Sum: Enjoy traditional Cantonese dumplings and tea at famous dim sum restaurants. Street Food: Try local favorites like egg waffles, fish balls, and roast meat on rice. Seafood: Feast on fresh seafood at fishing villages like Sai Kung or Lei Yue Mun. Michelin-Starred Dining: Indulge in gourmet cuisine at acclaimed restaurants around the city. Shopping in Hong Kong Explore Hong Kong`s diverse shopping scene, from luxury boutiques to bustling street markets. Causeway Bay: Shop for international brands and designer labels in this vibrant shopping district. Mong Kok: Browse through markets like Ladies` Market and Sneakers Street for trendy fashion and accessories. Central District: Discover upscale shopping malls and department stores in Hong Kong`s financial hub. Stanley Village: Find unique gifts, home decor, and clothing at this waterfront market. Getting Around Hong Kong Explore Hong Kong`s efficient transportation network to navigate the city and its surrounding areas. MTR (Mass Transit Railway): Use the extensive subway system to reach major attractions and districts. Star Ferry: Take a scenic ferry ride across Victoria Harbour between Hong Kong Island and Kowloon. Trams: Ride the iconic double-decker trams for a leisurely tour of Hong Kong Island. Buses and Minibuses: Use public buses or minibus services for convenient transportation. Taxis and Ride-Hailing: Hail taxis or use ride-hailing apps like Uber for quick trips. Where to Stay in Hong Kong Choose from a variety of accommodations in Hong Kong, ranging from luxury hotels to budget-friendly guesthouses. Luxury Hotels: Experience world-class hospitality at luxury hotels in Central, Tsim Sha Tsui, or Causeway Bay. Boutique Hotels: Stay in stylish boutique hotels offering personalized services and unique designs. Hostels and Guesthouses: Budget-friendly options with shared facilities, ideal for backpackers and solo travelers. Serviced Apartments: Rent furnished apartments for extended stays and added convenience. Practical Tips for Visitors Best Time to Visit: Visit in autumn (October to December) for pleasant weather and clear skies. Language: English and Cantonese are widely spoken; use basic phrases for communication. Currency: Use Hong Kong Dollars (HKD); major credit cards accepted in most establishments. Etiquette: Respect local customs and traditions; queue patiently and avoid loud behavior in public. Safety: Hong Kong is generally safe, but be cautious in crowded areas and watch for traffic. Internet Access: Stay connected with free Wi-Fi available in public areas and cafes. Enjoy Your Trip to Hong Kong! Get ready for an unforgettable journey in Hong Kong, where every corner reveals something new and exciting. Whether you`re exploring iconic landmarks or savoring delicious street food, Hong Kong promises an enriching travel experience.
Welcome to Shanghai! Explore the dynamic city of Shanghai, where the past and present seamlessly blend together. From historic landmarks to modern skyscrapers, Shanghai offers an exciting mix of culture, cuisine, and experiences. About Shanghai Shanghai, China`s largest city, is a global financial hub known for its futuristic skyline along the Huangpu River. The city is a melting pot of cultures and boasts a rich history influenced by its colonial past. Key features of Shanghai include its iconic Bund waterfront, traditional gardens, vibrant nightlife, and diverse culinary scene. Top Attractions The Bund: Walk along the historic waterfront to admire colonial-era architecture and panoramic views of Pudong. Yu Garden (Yuyuan Garden): Explore a classical Chinese garden with pavilions, ponds, and rockeries. Shanghai Tower: Ascend to the top of this skyscraper for breathtaking views of the city skyline. Oriental Pearl Tower: Visit the iconic TV tower with observation decks and a glass-bottomed walkway. Jing`an Temple: Experience the tranquility of this Buddhist temple in the heart of the city. Tianzifang: Wander through narrow alleyways filled with boutique shops, cafes, and art galleries. Shanghai Museum: Discover ancient Chinese art and artifacts in this world-class museum. French Concession: Stroll through tree-lined streets and explore trendy shops, bars, and restaurants. Shanghai Disneyland: Enjoy a magical day at the renowned Disney theme park. Culture and History Shanghai`s culture reflects a blend of traditional Chinese heritage and international influences. Shikumen Architecture: Discover unique stone-gate houses in historic neighborhoods like Xintiandi. Traditional Arts: Attend a Shanghai opera or acrobatics show to witness local performing arts. Colonial Heritage: Learn about Shanghai`s past through visits to former French and British concessions. Tea Culture: Participate in a tea ceremony to experience Chinese tea traditions. Dining in Shanghai Shanghai offers a diverse culinary landscape, from street food to Michelin-starred restaurants. Xiaolongbao: Try Shanghai`s famous soup dumplings at Din Tai Fung or Jia Jia Tang Bao. Hairy Crab: Indulge in seasonal delicacies like Shanghai hairy crab (da zha xie). Shanghai Noodles: Taste savory noodles topped with braised pork or seafood. Street Food: Explore local markets for snacks like scallion pancakes, pot stickers, and stinky tofu. High-End Dining: Experience fine dining at upscale restaurants showcasing modern Chinese cuisine. Shopping in Shanghai From luxury boutiques to bustling markets, Shanghai is a shopper`s paradise. Nanjing Road: Shop along China`s premier shopping street for international brands and department stores. Tianzifang and Xintiandi: Browse through boutiques and designer shops in these trendy neighborhoods. Old Street (Nanshi): Explore antique markets and traditional handicraft shops near Yu Garden. IAPM Mall: Visit a modern shopping complex with luxury retailers and gourmet dining options. Fake Market (AP Plaza): Haggle for souvenirs, electronics, and clothing at this bustling market. Getting Around Shanghai Shanghai has a convenient public transportation system that includes metro, buses, taxis, and ridesharing services. Shanghai Metro: Navigate the city using the extensive subway network connecting major attractions and districts. Public Buses: Use bus routes to reach specific destinations; consider using mobile apps for route planning. Taxis and Ridesharing: Hail taxis or use apps like Didi for convenient transportation around the city. Bicycles: Rent bikes from bike-sharing stations to explore parks and scenic areas. Where to Stay in Shanghai Choose from a range of accommodations in Shanghai, from luxury hotels to budget-friendly hostels. Luxury Hotels: Experience world-class hospitality at luxury hotels along the Bund or in Lujiazui. Boutique Hotels: Stay in stylish boutique hotels offering personalized services and unique designs. Hostels and Guesthouses: Budget-friendly options with shared facilities, ideal for backpackers and solo travelers. Apartments and Rentals: Rent serviced apartments or vacation homes for a comfortable and homely stay. Practical Tips for Visitors Best Time to Visit: Spring (March to May) and autumn (September to November) offer pleasant weather. Language: Learn basic Mandarin phrases; use translation apps for communication. Currency: Use Chinese Yuan (CNY); major credit cards accepted in tourist areas. Etiquette: Respect local customs and manners; avoid public displays of affection. Safety: Be vigilant of pickpockets in crowded areas; carry copies of important documents. Internet Access: Purchase a local SIM card for mobile data; free Wi-Fi available in many cafes and public places. Enjoy Your Trip to Shanghai! Get ready to immerse yourself in the energy and excitement of Shanghai. Whether you`re fascinated by history, captivated by the skyline, or indulging in delicious cuisine, Shanghai promises an unforgettable travel experience.
Overview ShenZhen (深圳) is a modern metropolis located in Guangdong Province, bordering Hong Kong. It`s renowned as a major tech hub and a gateway to China`s manufacturing industry. The city`s skyline is dominated by sleek skyscrapers, reflecting its status as a global innovation center. Top Attractions Splendid China Folk Village (锦绣中华民俗村) - Jǐnxiù Zhōnghuá Mínsú Cūn Window of the World (世界之窗) - Shìjiè Zhī Chuāng Dameisha Beach (大梅沙海滨公园) - Dàméishā Hǎibīn Gōngyuán Lianhua Mountain Park (莲花山公园) - Liánhuā Shān Gōngyuán Shenzhen Museum (深圳博物馆) - Shēnzhèn Bówùguǎn Dafen Oil Painting Village (大芬油画村) - Dàfēn Yóuhuà Cūn Nanshan Cultural Tourist Zone (南山文化旅游区) - Nánshān Wénhuà Lǚyóu Qū Shenzhen Bay Park (深圳湾公园) - Shēnzhèn Wān Gōngyuán Shenzhen Safari Park (深圳野生动物园) - Shēnzhèn Yěshēng Dòngwùyuán Tech and Innovation Huaqiangbei Electronics Market (华强北电子市场) - Huáqiángběi Diànzǐ Shìchǎng Shenzhen Bay Tech Ecological Park (深圳湾科技生态园) - Shēnzhèn Wān Kējì Shēngtài Yuán Tencent Seafront Towers (腾讯滨海大厦) - Téngxùn Bīnhǎi Dàshà DJI Flagship Store (大疆旗舰店) - Dàjiāng Qíjiàn Diàn Shopping and Dining Coco Park and OCT-LOFT (coco park 和 华侨城创意文化园区) - Huáqiáo Chéng Chuàngyì Wénhuà Yuánqū Dongmen Pedestrian Street (东门步行街) - Dōngmén Bùxíng Jiē OCT-LOFT Creative Culture Park (华侨城创意文化园区) - Huáqiáo Chéng Chuàngyì Wénhuà Yuánqū Laojie (Old Street) in Luohu (罗湖老街) - Luóhú Lǎojiē Nightlife and Entertainment Shekou Sea World (蛇口海上世界) - Shékǒu Hǎishàng Shìjiè Futian and Luohu Districts (福田和罗湖区) - Fútián hé Luóhú Qū Coco Park and OCT Bay (coco park 和 华侨城创意文化园区) - Huáqiáo Chéng Chuàngyì Wénhuà Yuánqū Shenzhen Concert Hall (深圳音乐厅) - Shēnzhèn Yīnyuètīng Practical Tips Transportation: Utilize Shenzhen`s efficient metro system and ride-hailing apps. Language: Learn basic Mandarin phrases for easier communication. Safety: Be cautious of pickpocketing in crowded areas. Visa: Check China`s visa policy based on your nationality. Currency: Use local currency (Renminbi) for transactions. Weather: Pack accordingly for Shenzhen`s subtropical climate. Hidden Gems Wutong Mountain (梧桐山) - Wútóng Shān Dapeng Ancient City (大鹏古城) - Dàpéng Gǔchéng Guangdong Hakka Museum (广东客家博物馆) - Guǎngdōng Kèjiā Bówùguǎn Additional Dining Recommendations Dim Sum: Experience authentic Cantonese dim sum. Seafood: Indulge in fresh seafood in Shekou. Street Food: Explore Dongmen Food Street for local snacks. By exploring these attractions, dining spots, and practical tips, you`ll have a comprehensive guide to experiencing Shenzhen`s rich blend of culture, technology, and natural beauty.
Welcome to Beijing! Discover the vibrant capital city of China, where ancient history meets modernity. Beijing, with its rich heritage, iconic landmarks, delicious cuisine, and bustling streets, promises an unforgettable journey. About Beijing Beijing, also known as Peking, is the political, cultural, and educational center of China. As one of the world`s oldest continuous civilizations, Beijing has been the heart of Chinese history for centuries. Key features of Beijing include its historic hutongs (narrow alleys), ancient palaces, and temples alongside modern skyscrapers and shopping malls. The city is renowned for its role in Chinese history, serving as the capital of several dynasties. Top Attractions Forbidden City (Palace Museum): Explore the largest imperial palace complex in the world, with over 9,000 rooms filled with treasures and historical artifacts. Great Wall of China: Visit iconic sections like Badaling, Mutianyu, or Jinshanling for stunning views of this UNESCO World Heritage site. Tiananmen Square: Discover the heart of Beijing and witness the monumental Tiananmen Gate, Chairman Mao`s Mausoleum, and the National Museum of China. Temple of Heaven: Experience the spiritual ambiance of this ancient temple complex where emperors once prayed for good harvests. Summer Palace: Wander through lush gardens, pavilions, and Kunming Lake at this UNESCO-listed royal retreat. Hutong Tour: Take a rickshaw ride through traditional hutongs to see local life and visit courtyard homes. 798 Art District: Explore Beijing`s contemporary art scene in a former factory complex filled with galleries, studios, and cafes. Lama Temple (Yonghe Temple): Admire the impressive Tibetan-style architecture and giant Buddha statue at this active Buddhist temple. National Museum of China: Learn about Chinese history, art, and culture through extensive exhibitions. Culture and History Beijing is steeped in cultural heritage, offering a glimpse into China`s ancient traditions and customs. Peking Opera: Attend a live performance of this traditional art form known for its colorful costumes, music, and storytelling. Chinese Tea Culture: Visit tea houses to sample different teas and participate in tea ceremonies. Imperial Architecture: Marvel at the architectural marvels of the Forbidden City, Summer Palace, and Temple of Heaven. Traditional Festivals: Experience festive celebrations during Chinese New Year, Mid-Autumn Festival, and Dragon Boat Festival. Beijing Cuisine: Indulge in local specialties such as Peking duck, hotpot, dumplings, and street food delicacies. Dining in Beijing Beijing offers a diverse culinary landscape, from gourmet dining to street-side snacks. Peking Duck: Savor the crispy-skinned duck at renowned restaurants like Quanjude or Da Dong. Street Food: Explore Wangfujing Snack Street for a variety of local snacks, skewers, and sweets. Hutong Restaurants: Dine in historic courtyard homes serving homestyle Beijing cuisine. Hotpot: Enjoy interactive dining with a bubbling pot of broth and fresh ingredients. Dumplings and Noodles: Try handmade jiaozi (dumplings) and la mian (hand-pulled noodles) in bustling noodle shops. Teahouses: Relax in traditional teahouses and sample regional teas paired with snacks. Shopping in Beijing Discover unique souvenirs, antiques, and modern goods in Beijing`s vibrant shopping districts. Silk Market: Bargain for silk products, clothing, and accessories at this bustling market. Wangfujing Street: Shop for international brands, local goods, and Beijing-style snacks. Panjiayuan Antique Market: Browse through a vast array of antiques, ceramics, and curios. Hongqiao Pearl Market: Find pearls, jewelry, and electronics at competitive prices. Dashilar Street: Explore historic Dashilar alley for traditional handicrafts and nostalgic items. Practical Tips for Visitors Best Time to Visit: Spring (April to May) and autumn (September to October) offer mild weather and fewer crowds. Language: Learn basic Mandarin phrases; use translation apps for communication. Currency: Use Chinese Yuan (CNY); major credit cards accepted in tourist areas. Transportation: Navigate the city with the extensive subway system, buses, taxis, and ridesharing apps. Accommodation: Choose from luxury hotels, boutique guesthouses, or budget-friendly hostels. Etiquette: Respect local customs, such as using both hands to receive items and addressing people with courtesy. Safety: Be cautious of pickpockets in crowded areas; keep valuables secure. Internet Access: Purchase a local SIM card for mobile data; free Wi-Fi available in many public places. Health and Hygiene: Carry bottled water and practice good hygiene; be aware of air quality during winter. Enjoy Your Journey in Beijing! Immerse yourself in the vibrant culture, rich history, and captivating experiences that Beijing has to offer. Whether you`re exploring ancient landmarks or indulging in local cuisine, Beijing promises an unforgettable journey that will leave lasting memories.

Get Ready For China

Welcome to Hong Kong! Explore the vibrant city of Hong Kong, where East meets West in a dazzling fusion of culture, cuisine, and modernity. From towering skyscrapers to tranquil islands, Hong Kong offers a captivating experience. About Hong Kong Hong Kong is a dynamic city known for its stunning skyline, bustling street markets, and picturesque harbor. As a Special Administrative Region of China, Hong Kong has its own unique blend of Chinese and Western influences. Key features of Hong Kong include its vibrant nightlife, world-class dining scene, and diverse shopping options. Top Attractions Victoria Peak: Ride the Peak Tram for panoramic views of Hong Kong`s skyline. Star Ferry: Take a scenic ride across Victoria Harbour between Hong Kong Island and Kowloon. Ngong Ping 360: Visit Lantau Island and see the Tian Tan Buddha statue. Temple Street Night Market: Explore this lively market for street food, souvenirs, and bargain shopping. Victoria Harbour Light Show: Watch the Symphony of Lights show illuminating Hong Kong`s skyscrapers. Ocean Park: Enjoy thrilling rides and see marine life at this popular amusement park. Stanley Market: Visit this waterfront market for arts, crafts, and seaside dining. Wong Tai Sin Temple: Experience traditional Chinese architecture and visit a popular Taoist temple. Hong Kong Disneyland: Discover magical attractions and meet Disney characters. Culture and History Hong Kong`s culture is a blend of ancient traditions and modern influences. Chinese Festivals: Experience traditional festivals like Chinese New Year and Mid-Autumn Festival. Colonial Heritage: Explore historic sites such as the Former British Consulate and Western District Public Cargo Working Area. Lamma Island: Escape to this laid-back island with hiking trails and seafood restaurants. Hong Kong Heritage Museum: Learn about the city`s history, art, and culture through exhibitions. Dining in Hong Kong Hong Kong is a food lover`s paradise, offering a wide range of culinary delights. Dim Sum: Enjoy traditional Cantonese dumplings and tea at famous dim sum restaurants. Street Food: Try local favorites like egg waffles, fish balls, and roast meat on rice. Seafood: Feast on fresh seafood at fishing villages like Sai Kung or Lei Yue Mun. Michelin-Starred Dining: Indulge in gourmet cuisine at acclaimed restaurants around the city. Shopping in Hong Kong Explore Hong Kong`s diverse shopping scene, from luxury boutiques to bustling street markets. Causeway Bay: Shop for international brands and designer labels in this vibrant shopping district. Mong Kok: Browse through markets like Ladies` Market and Sneakers Street for trendy fashion and accessories. Central District: Discover upscale shopping malls and department stores in Hong Kong`s financial hub. Stanley Village: Find unique gifts, home decor, and clothing at this waterfront market. Getting Around Hong Kong Explore Hong Kong`s efficient transportation network to navigate the city and its surrounding areas. MTR (Mass Transit Railway): Use the extensive subway system to reach major attractions and districts. Star Ferry: Take a scenic ferry ride across Victoria Harbour between Hong Kong Island and Kowloon. Trams: Ride the iconic double-decker trams for a leisurely tour of Hong Kong Island. Buses and Minibuses: Use public buses or minibus services for convenient transportation. Taxis and Ride-Hailing: Hail taxis or use ride-hailing apps like Uber for quick trips. Where to Stay in Hong Kong Choose from a variety of accommodations in Hong Kong, ranging from luxury hotels to budget-friendly guesthouses. Luxury Hotels: Experience world-class hospitality at luxury hotels in Central, Tsim Sha Tsui, or Causeway Bay. Boutique Hotels: Stay in stylish boutique hotels offering personalized services and unique designs. Hostels and Guesthouses: Budget-friendly options with shared facilities, ideal for backpackers and solo travelers. Serviced Apartments: Rent furnished apartments for extended stays and added convenience. Practical Tips for Visitors Best Time to Visit: Visit in autumn (October to December) for pleasant weather and clear skies. Language: English and Cantonese are widely spoken; use basic phrases for communication. Currency: Use Hong Kong Dollars (HKD); major credit cards accepted in most establishments. Etiquette: Respect local customs and traditions; queue patiently and avoid loud behavior in public. Safety: Hong Kong is generally safe, but be cautious in crowded areas and watch for traffic. Internet Access: Stay connected with free Wi-Fi available in public areas and cafes. Enjoy Your Trip to Hong Kong! Get ready for an unforgettable journey in Hong Kong, where every corner reveals something new and exciting. Whether you`re exploring iconic landmarks or savoring delicious street food, Hong Kong promises an enriching travel experience.
Overview ChengDu (成都) is the capital city of SiChuan province in south-west China. Known for its spicy cuisine, relaxed lifestyle, and panda conservation centers, ChengDu offers a unique blend of modernity and tradition. Top Attractions Chengdu Research Base of Giant Panda Breeding (成都大熊猫繁育研究基地) - Chéngdū Dàxióngmāo Fányù Yánjiū Jīdì Jinli Ancient Street (锦里古街) - Jǐnlǐ Gǔjiē Wuhou Shrine (武侯祠) - Wǔhóu Cí Qingcheng Mountain (青城山) - Qīngchéng Shān Dujiangyan Irrigation System (都江堰) - Dūjiāngyàn Wide and Narrow Alleys (Kuanzhai Alley) (宽窄巷子) - Kuānzhǎi Xiàngzi Sichuan Opera and Face Changing Show (川剧变脸) - Chuānjù Biànliǎn Chengdu People`s Park (成都人民公园) - Chéngdū Rénmín Gōngyuán Chunxi Road (春熙路) - Chūnxī Lù Song Xian Qiao Antique Market (宋庆龄故居松仙桥古玩市场) - Sòng Qìnglíng Gùjū Sōngxiānqiáo Gǔwàn Shìchǎng Wenshu Monastery (文殊院) - Wénshū Yuàn Mt. Emei (峨眉山) - Éméi Shān (Day trip from Chengdu) Dining Experiences Hot Pot (火锅) - Huǒguō Sichuan Cuisine (川菜) - Chuāncài Tea Houses (茶馆) - Cháguǎn Huangcheng Laoma (Old Master Huang`s Restaurant) (黄城老妈) - Huángchéng Lǎomā Yulin Life Plaza Food Street (玉林生活广场美食街) - Yùlín Shēnghuó Guǎngchǎng Měishí Jiē Long Chaoshou Restaurant (Dragon`s Wonton Restaurant) (龙抄手) - Lóng Chāoshǒu Shopping and Entertainment Chunxi Road Shopping District (春熙路购物区) - Chūnxī Lù Gòuwù Qū Taikoo Li (太古里) - Tàigǔlǐ IFS (International Finance Square) (国际金融中心) - Guójì Jīnróng Zhōngxīn Sichuan Opera and Tea Culture Show (川剧茶艺表演) - Chuānjù Cháyì Biǎoyǎn Chengdu Global Center (成都环球中心) - Chéngdū Huánqiú Zhōngxīn Chengdu IFS Ice Fountain (IFS冰雪奇缘) - IFS Bīngxuě Qíyuán Chengdu New Century Global Center (成都世纪环球中心) - Chéngdū Shìjì Huánqiú Zhōngxīn Tianfu New Area (天府新区) - Tiānfǔ Xīn Qū. Tianfu New Area is a rapidly developing region known for its modern architecture, innovative industries, and urban planning. Nightlife and Entertainment Wide and Narrow Alleys (Kuanzhai Alley) (宽窄巷子) - Kuānzhǎi Xiàngzi Jiuyanqiao Bar Street (九眼桥酒吧街) - Jiǔyǎnqiáo Jiǔbā Jiē Lan Kwai Fong Chengdu (成都兰桂坊) - Chéngdū Lánguìfāng Heming Teahouse (Hemingway Bar) (海明茶馆) - Hǎimíng Cháguǎn Chengdu Sino-Ocean Taikoo Li (成都远洋太古里) - Chéngdū Yuǎnyáng Tàigǔlǐ Practical Tips Transportation: Use the Chengdu metro system, buses, or taxis for getting around. Language: Mandarin is the primary language; learn some basic phrases. Weather: Chengdu has a mild climate, but prepare for occasional rain, especially in summer. Currency: Use local currency (Renminbi). Panda Visits: Plan your visit to the panda base early in the morning for the best panda viewing. Respect Local Customs: Embrace the laid-back lifestyle and tea culture of Chengdu. Hidden Gems Chengdu Culture Park (成都文化公园) - Chéngdū Wénhuà Gōngyuán Chengdu Panda Asian Food Festival (成都国际熊猫美食节) - Chéngdū Guójì Xióngmāo Měishí Jié Anshun Bridge Night Market (安顺廊桥夜市) - Ānshùn Lángqiáo Yèshì Enjoy exploring Chengdu`s rich culture, delicious cuisine, and the adorable giant pandas!
Day Trips from Beijing, China Tianjin 天津 (Tiānjīn): Explore this coastal city known for its European-style architecture, the Tianjin Eye Ferris wheel, and the Ancient Culture Street. Take a leisurely stroll along the Haihe River, visit the Porcelain House, and sample local delicacies such as Goubuli Baozi (steamed stuffed buns) and mahua (fried dough twists). Chengde 承德 (Chéngdé): Visit the UNESCO-listed Mountain Resort and its outlying temples, including the Puning Temple and the Eight Outer Temples. Immerse yourself in the serene atmosphere of the Mountain Resort, explore the intricately designed temples, and marvel at the towering statue of Guanyin at the Puning Temple. Longqing Gorge 龙庆峡 (Lóngqìng Xiá): Experience the stunning natural beauty of Longqing Gorge, with its emerald green waters, towering cliffs, and scenic boat rides. Take a cruise along the gorge, ride the cable car for panoramic views, and enjoy outdoor activities such as rock climbing and bungee jumping. Simatai Great Wall 司马台长城 (Sīmǎtái Chángchéng): Explore the Simatai section of the Great Wall, known for its steep terrain, rugged beauty, and well-preserved watchtowers. Hike along the ancient wall, admire the panoramic views of the surrounding mountains and valleys, and experience the thrill of walking on one of China`s most iconic landmarks. Qinhuangdao 秦皇岛 (Qínhuángdǎo): Relax on the beaches of Beidaihe or explore the Shanhaiguan Pass, where the Great Wall meets the sea. Spend a day soaking up the sun on the sandy shores, indulge in fresh seafood at beachside restaurants, and visit historical landmarks such as the First Pass Under Heaven. Chengde 承德 (Chéngdé): Visit the Chengde Mountain Resort, also known as the `Little Potala Palace,` and the nearby Puning Temple with its giant statue of Guanyin. Explore the vast complex of palaces, temples, and gardens at the Mountain Resort, and marvel at the intricate architecture and religious artifacts at the Puning Temple. Qinghuang Island 秦皇岛 (Qínhuángdǎo): Take a boat trip to Qinghuang Island to visit the Old Dragon`s Head, where the Great Wall meets the Bohai Sea. Explore the ancient watchtowers and fortifications, stroll along the beach, and enjoy panoramic views of the sea and surrounding coastline. Shanxi Pingyao 山西平遥 (Shānxī Píngyáo): Explore the ancient city of Pingyao, a UNESCO World Heritage Site known for its well-preserved Ming and Qing dynasty architecture. Wander through the narrow cobblestone streets, visit historic buildings such as the City Wall and Rishengchang Draft Bank, and learn about the city`s rich history and cultural heritage. Chengde 承德 (Chéngdé): Discover the temples of Chengde, including the Putuo Zongcheng Temple, modeled after the Potala Palace in Lhasa, and the Temple of Universal Peace. Marvel at the grandeur of the imperial temples, explore the intricately carved halls and pavilions, and learn about the religious practices of Tibetan Buddhism. Langfang 廊坊 (Lángfáng): Visit the Nanhu Peach Blossom Village in Langfang during the spring to enjoy the beautiful peach blossoms in bloom. Take a leisurely stroll through the orchards, admire the colorful blooms, and participate in traditional activities such as peach blossom viewing and folk performances. Shijiazhuang 石家庄 (Shíjiāzhuāng): Explore the Cangyan Mountain Scenic Area and its ancient Buddhist grottoes, temples, and scenic landscapes. Hike along the mountain trails, visit the renowned Cangyan Mountain Grottoes, and admire the natural beauty of the surrounding valleys and waterfalls. Tianjin 天津 (Tiānjīn): Take a stroll along the Haihe River and explore the Italian Style Town, a neighborhood with European-style architecture and cobblestone streets. Visit historical landmarks such as the Tianjin Railway Station and the Former Residence of Liang Qichao, and sample Italian cuisine at local restaurants and cafes. Qinhuangdao 秦皇岛 (Qínhuángdǎo): Relax on the beaches of Nandaihe and enjoy seafood delicacies at local restaurants overlooking the sea. Swim in the clear waters, sunbathe on the sandy shores, and savor fresh seafood dishes such as steamed crabs, grilled fish, and fried squid. Chengde 承德 (Chéngdé): Visit the Qingchui Mountain, known for its stunning autumn foliage and panoramic views of the surrounding landscape. Take a scenic drive through the mountains, hike along the forest trails, and enjoy panoramic views of the colorful autumn leaves and distant peaks. Tangshan 唐山 (Tángshān): Explore the Tangshan Earthquake Memorial Park and Museum to learn about the devastating earthquake that struck the city in 1976. Visit the memorial hall, view exhibits on earthquake science and disaster prevention, and pay tribute to the victims of the earthquake at the memorial square. Jietai Temple 戒台寺 (Jiètái Sì): Discover the ancient Jietai Temple, known for its beautiful Buddhist architecture and serene surroundings. Explore the temple complex, admire the intricate carvings and statues, and participate in Buddhist rituals such as meditation and prayer. Badachu 八大处 (Bādàchù): Explore the scenic area of Badachu, home to eight ancient Buddhist temples nestled in the hills of Western Beijing. Climb the stone steps to each temple, admire the ancient architecture and religious artifacts, and enjoy panoramic views of Beijing from the hilltops. Xiangshan Park 香山公园 (Xiāngshān Gōngyuán): Enjoy hiking and panoramic views of Beijing from Xiangshan Park, also known as Fragrant Hills Park, especially beautiful during autumn. Take a leisurely stroll through the forested hills, climb to the mountain peak for panoramic views of the city, and admire the vibrant colors of the autumn foliage. Shilinxia Glass Platform 石林峡玻璃栈道 (Shílíngxiá Bōlí Zhàndào): Experience the thrill of walking on the glass platform suspended over the Shilinxia scenic area, offering stunning views of the surrounding landscape. Walk along the transparent walkway, peer over the edge to see the valley below, and take in the breathtaking scenery of the rugged cliffs and rock formations. Wuling Mountain 武陵山 (Wǔlíng Shān): Escape to the tranquility of Wuling Mountain, known for its lush forests, waterfalls, and hiking trails. Explore the mountain paths, discover hidden waterfalls and streams, and enjoy outdoor activities such as hiking, picnicking, and birdwatching.
Overview ChengDu (成都) is the capital city of SiChuan province in south-west China. Known for its spicy cuisine, relaxed lifestyle, and panda conservation centers, Chengdu offers a unique blend of modernity and tradition. Top Attractions Chengdu Research Base of Giant Panda Breeding (成都大熊猫繁育研究基地) - Chéngdū Dàxióngmāo Fányù Yánjiū Jīdì Jinli Ancient Street (锦里古街) - Jǐnlǐ Gǔjiē Wuhou Shrine (武侯祠) - Wǔhóu Cí Qingcheng Mountain (青城山) - Qīngchéng Shān Dujiangyan Irrigation System (都江堰) - Dūjiāngyàn Wide and Narrow Alleys (Kuanzhai Alley) (宽窄巷子) - Kuānzhǎi Xiàngzi Sichuan Opera and Face Changing Show (川剧变脸) - Chuānjù Biànliǎn Chengdu People`s Park (成都人民公园) - Chéngdū Rénmín Gōngyuán Chunxi Road (春熙路) - Chūnxī Lù Song Xian Qiao Antique Market (宋庆龄故居松仙桥古玩市场) - Sòng Qìnglíng Gùjū Sōngxiānqiáo Gǔwàn Shìchǎng Wenshu Monastery (文殊院) - Wénshū Yuàn Mt. Emei (峨眉山) - Éméi Shān (Day trip from Chengdu) Tianfu New Area (天府新区) - Tiānfǔ Xīn Qū Anshun Bridge Night Market (安顺廊桥夜市) - Ānshùn Lángqiáo Yèshì Chengdu Culture Park (成都文化公园) - Chéngdū Wénhuà Gōngyuán Chengdu Panda Asian Food Festival (成都国际熊猫美食节) - Chéngdū Guójì Xióngmāo Měishí Jié Chengdu Botanical Garden (成都植物园) - Chéngdū Zhíwùyuán Sichuan Science and Technology Museum (四川科技馆) - Sìchuān Kējìguǎn Chengdu Tianfu Square (成都天府广场) - Chéngdū Tiānfǔ Guǎngchǎng Dufu Thatched Cottage (杜甫草堂) - Dùfǔ Cǎotáng Huanglongxi Ancient Town (黄龙溪古镇) - Huánglóngxī Gǔzhèn Sichuan University (四川大学) - Sìchuān Dàxué Sanxingdui Museum (三星堆博物馆) - Sānxīngduī Bówùguǎn Daci Temple (大慈寺) - Dàcí Sì Luodai Ancient Town (洛带古镇) - Luòdài Gǔzhèn Chengdu Sports Center (成都市体育中心) - Chéngdū Shì Tǐyù Zhōngxīn Chengdu Eastern Music Park (成都东部音乐公园) - Chéngdū Dōngbù Yīnyuè Gōngyuán Huanhuaxi Park (浣花溪公园) - Huànhuāxī Gōngyuán Qintai Road Historic District (琴台路历史文化街区) - Qíntái Lù Lìshǐ Wénhuà Jiēqū Chengdu Happy Valley (成都欢乐谷) - Chéngdū Huānlègǔ Huaxi Music Fountain (花溪音乐喷泉) - Huāxī Yīnyuè Pēnquán Hejiang Pavilion (合江亭) - Héjiāng Tíng Chengdu Radio and TV Tower (成都电视塔) - Chéngdū Diànshì Tǎ Wolong National Nature Reserve (卧龙国家级自然保护区) - Wòlóng Guójiā Jí Zìrán Bǎohùqū Mt. Qingcheng-Dujiangyan Scenic Area (青城山-都江堰风景区) - Qīngchéng Shān-Dūjiāngyàn Fēngjǐng Qū Chengdu Tianfu Greenway (成都天府绿道) - Chéngdū Tiānfǔ Lǜdào Chengdu Haichang Polar Ocean Park (成都海昌极地海洋公园) - Chéngdū Hǎichāng Jídì Hǎiyáng Gōngyuán Dining Experiences Hot Pot (火锅) - Huǒguō Sichuan Cuisine (川菜) - Chuāncài Tea Houses (茶馆) - Cháguǎn Huangcheng Laoma (Old Master Huang`s Restaurant) (黄城老妈) - Huángchéng Lǎomā Yulin Life Plaza Food Street (玉林生活广场美食街) - Yùlín Shēnghuó Guǎngchǎng Měishí Jiē Long Chaoshou Restaurant (Dragon`s Wonton Restaurant) (龙抄手) - Lóng Chāoshǒu Shopping and Entertainment Chunxi Road Shopping District (春熙路购物区) - Chūnxī Lù Gòuwù Qū Taikoo Li (太古里) - Tàigǔlǐ IFS (International Finance Square) (国际金融中心) - Guójì Jīnróng Zhōngxīn Sichuan Opera and Tea Culture Show (川剧茶艺表演) - Chuānjù Cháyì Biǎoyǎn Chengdu Global Center (成都环球中心) - Chéngdū Huánqiú Zhōngxīn Chengdu IFS Ice Fountain (IFS冰雪奇缘) - IFS Bīngxuě Qíyuán Chengdu New Century Global Center (成都世纪环球中心) - Chéngdū Shìjì Huánqiú Zhōngxīn Tianfu New Area (天府新区) - Tiānfǔ Xīn Qū Nightlife and Entertainment Wide and Narrow Alleys (Kuanzhai Alley) (宽窄巷子) - Kuānzhǎi Xiàngzi Jiuyanqiao Bar Street (九眼桥酒吧街) - Jiǔyǎnqiáo Jiǔbā Jiē Lan Kwai Fong Chengdu (成都兰桂坊) - Chéngdū Lánguìfāng Heming Teahouse (Hemingway Bar) (海明茶馆) - Hǎimíng Cháguǎn Chengdu Sino-Ocean Taikoo Li (成都远洋太古里) - Chéngdū Yuǎnyáng Tàigǔlǐ Practical Tips Transportation: Use the Chengdu metro system, buses, or taxis for getting around. Language: Mandarin is the primary language; learn some basic phrases. Weather: Chengdu has a mild climate, but prepare for occasional rain, especially in summer. Currency: Use local currency (Renminbi). Panda Visits: Plan your visit to the panda base early in the morning for the best panda viewing. Respect Local Customs: Embrace the laid-back lifestyle and tea culture of Chengdu. Hidden Gems Leshan Giant Buddha (乐山大佛) - Lèshān Dàfó (Day trip from Chengdu) Mount Qingcheng (青城山) - Qīngchéng Shān (Day trip from Chengdu) Luodai Ancient Town (洛带古镇) - Luòdài Gǔzhèn Wolong National Nature Reserve (卧龙国家级自然保护区) - Wòlóng Guójiā Jí Zìrán Bǎohùqū Chengdu Tianfu Greenway (成都天府绿道) - Chéngdū Tiānfǔ Lǜdào Chengdu Haichang Polar Ocean Park (成都海昌极地海洋公园) - Chéngdū Hǎichāng Jídì Hǎiyáng Gōngyuán Chengdu Anren Ancient Town (成都安仁古镇) - Chéngdū Ānrén Gǔzhèn Chengdu Wuhou Shrine Music and Dance Show (武侯祠音乐舞蹈表演) - Wǔhóu Cí Yīnyuè Wǔdǎo Biǎoyǎn Mount Siguniang (Four Sisters Mountain) (四姑娘山) - Sìgūniáng Shān (Multi-day excursion from Chengdu) Chengdu Happy Valley (成都欢乐谷) - Chéngdū Huānlègǔ Huanglongxi Ancient Town (黄龙溪古镇) - Huánglóngxī Gǔzhèn Sanxingdui Museum (三星堆博物馆) - Sānxīngduī Bówùguǎn Dujiangyan Panda Base (都江堰熊猫基地) - Dūjiāngyàn Xióngmāo Jīdì Chengdu Du Fu Thatched Cottage Museum (成都杜甫草堂博物馆) - Chéngdū Dùfǔ Cǎotáng Bówùguǎn Chengdu Lixiang Park (成都荔香公园) - Chéngdū Lìxiāng Gōngyuán Chengdu Yongling Mausoleum (成都永陵) - Chéngdū Yǒnglíng Chengdu Aircraft Carrier Theme Park (成都航空母舰主题公园) - Chéngdū Hángkōng Mǔjiàn Zhǔtí Gōngyuán Chengdu Happy Water World (成都欢乐水世界) - Chéngdū Huānlè Shuǐ Shìjiè Chengdu Confucius Temple (成都文庙) - Chéngdū Wénmiào Chengdu Huanglongxi Film and Television Base (成都黄龙溪影视基地) - Chéngdū Huánglóngxī Yǐngshì Jīdì Chengdu Xiling Snow Mountain (成都西岭雪山) - Chéngdū Xīlǐng Xuěshān Chengdu Sichuan Opera Theater (成都川剧院) - Chéngdū Chuānjù Yuàn Chengdu Bonsai Garden (成都盆景园) - Chéngdū Pénjǐng Yuán Chengdu Nanhu Dreamland (成都南湖梦幻岛) - Chéngdū Nánhú Mènghuàn Dǎo Chengdu Dayi Strawberry Park (成都大邑草莓园) - Chéngdū Dàyì Cǎoméi Yuán Chengdu Dinosaur Museum (成都恐龙博物馆) - Chéngdū Kǒnglóng Bówùguǎn Enjoy exploring Chengdu`s rich culture, delicious cuisine, and the adorable giant pandas!
4-Week Food Tour of China This itinerary covers a diverse range of regional cuisines in China, from the hearty flavors of Northern cuisine to the fiery spice of SiChuan, the delicate dishes of JiangSu, and the fresh seafood of Cantonese cuisine. Week 1: Beijing and Northern Cuisine Sample Beijing`s famous Peking Duck at renowned restaurants such as Quanjude or Da Dong. Explore the bustling Wangfujing Snack Street and try local street food delicacies like jianbing (savory Chinese crepes) and lamb skewers. Indulge in traditional Beijing snacks like zhajiangmian (noodles with soybean paste), douzhi (fermented mung bean soup), and tanghulu (candied fruit skewers). Week 2: Sichuan Province and Spicy Cuisine Experience the bold and spicy flavors of Sichuan cuisine with dishes like mapo tofu, kung pao chicken, and hot pot. Visit Chengdu`s famous food streets, such as Jinli Ancient Street and Kuanzhai Alley, to sample a variety of Sichuan snacks and street foods. Explore local markets like Jinli and Wuhou, where you can taste authentic Sichuan specialties and shop for spices and ingredients. Week 3: Shanghai and Jiangsu Cuisine Enjoy Shanghai`s vibrant food scene with a mix of classic dishes like xiaolongbao (soup dumplings), shengjianbao (pan-fried pork buns), and hairy crab. Explore traditional Shanghainese restaurants and local eateries in areas like Yuyuan Garden, Xintiandi, and Tianzifang. Sample Jiangsu cuisine specialties like braised pork belly, sweet and sour spare ribs, and freshwater delicacies from the nearby Yangtze River. Week 4: Guangdong Province and Cantonese Cuisine Discover the diverse flavors of Cantonese cuisine in Guangzhou, known for its fresh seafood, roasted meats, and dim sum. Explore local markets like Shangxiajiu Pedestrian Street and Guangzhou`s Wholesale Food Market to taste a wide range of Cantonese dishes and snacks. Indulge in iconic Cantonese dishes such as roast duck, steamed fish, BBQ pork, and shrimp dumplings.
Places to visit in and around HangZhou West Lake (西湖) - Xī Hú Description: West Lake is the most iconic attraction in Hangzhou, known for its scenic beauty, historic sites, and cultural significance. Visitors can take leisurely boat cruises, stroll along the promenades, and admire picturesque pavilions, bridges, and pagodas. Lingyin Temple (灵隐寺) - Língyǐn Sì Description: Lingyin Temple is one of the oldest and most prestigious Buddhist temples in China, nestled at the foot of Lingyin Mountain. The temple complex features ancient halls, pagodas, and intricate stone carvings, as well as serene forested surroundings ideal for contemplation and meditation. Qinghefang Ancient Street (清河坊古街) - Qīnghéfāng Gǔ Jiē Description: Qinghefang Ancient Street is a historic pedestrian street lined with traditional shops, teahouses, and snack stalls. Visitors can explore Ming and Qing dynasty architecture, sample local delicacies, and shop for souvenirs such as silk, tea, and handicrafts. Leifeng Pagoda (雷峰塔) - Léifēng Tǎ Description: Leifeng Pagoda is a historic tower located on Sunset Hill overlooking West Lake. Originally built in the 10th century, the pagoda offers panoramic views of the lake and surrounding scenery. Visitors can climb to the top for breathtaking vistas and learn about the pagoda`s storied history. Hangzhou Songcheng Park (杭州宋城景区) - Hángzhōu Sòngchéng Jǐngqū Description: Hangzhou Songcheng Park is a large-scale cultural theme park showcasing the rich heritage and traditions of ancient China. The park features replica ancient streets, performances, and attractions, allowing visitors to experience the charm of traditional Chinese culture. Longjing Tea Plantation (龙井茶园) - Lóngjǐng Cháyuán Description: Longjing Tea Plantation is famous for producing Longjing (Dragon Well) tea, one of China`s most prized green teas. Visitors can tour the tea fields, learn about tea cultivation and processing, and sample freshly brewed Longjing tea while enjoying scenic views of the countryside. Hangzhou Botanical Garden (杭州植物园) - Hángzhōu Zhíwù Yuán Description: Hangzhou Botanical Garden is a tranquil oasis featuring diverse plant collections, landscaped gardens, and nature trails. Visitors can explore themed gardens, conservatories, and aquatic habitats, as well as enjoy picnics, birdwatching, and photography amidst lush greenery. Hefang Street (河坊街) - Héfāng Jiē Description: Hefang Street is a vibrant pedestrian thoroughfare in the heart of Hangzhou`s historic district. The street is lined with shops selling traditional crafts, snacks, and souvenirs, as well as teahouses, street performers, and cultural attractions. Hangzhou Zoo (杭州动物园) - Hángzhōu Dòngwù Yuán Description: Hangzhou Zoo is home to a diverse collection of animal species from around the world, including rare and endangered species. Visitors can observe animals in naturalistic habitats, attend feeding sessions and animal shows, and enjoy family-friendly attractions such as playgrounds and picnic areas. China National Tea Museum (中国茶叶博物馆) - Zhōngguó Cháyè Bówùguǎn Description: China National Tea Museum is dedicated to the history, culture, and art of tea in China. The museum features informative exhibits, interactive displays, and traditional tea ceremonies, providing insights into the significance of tea in Chinese society and its cultural significance. Yuhuang Mountain (玉皇山) - Yùhuáng Shān Description: Yuhuang Mountain is a scenic area known for its natural beauty, religious sites, and hiking trails. Visitors can ascend to the mountain peak for panoramic views of Hangzhou and the Qiantang River, explore ancient temples and shrines, and enjoy outdoor activities such as hiking, picnicking, and birdwatching. Hangzhou Grand Canal (杭州大运河) - Hángzhōu Dà Yùnhé Description: Hangzhou Grand Canal is a UNESCO World Heritage Site and one of the longest and oldest canals in the world. Visitors can take boat cruises along the canal, passing through historic districts, scenic landscapes, and cultural landmarks, while learning about the canal`s role in China`s history and economy. Hangzhou Xixi National Wetland Park (西溪国家湿地公园) - Xīxī Guójiā Shīdì Gōngyuán Description: Hangzhou Xixi National Wetland Park is a vast natural reserve featuring wetlands, waterways, and diverse ecosystems. Visitors can explore the park`s scenic trails, wooden boardwalks, and traditional water villages, as well as enjoy boating, birdwatching, and nature photography amidst pristine surroundings. Hangzhou China Silk Town (中国丝绸城) - Zhōngguó Sīchóu Chéng Description: Hangzhou China Silk Town is a commercial district specializing in silk products, textiles, and silk-related crafts. Visitors can shop for high-quality silk fabrics, clothing, accessories, and watch demonstrations of silk production techniques such as weaving and embroidery. The town also features museums, galleries, and cultural exhibits showcasing the history and craftsmanship of silk in Hangzhou. Wushan Square (吴山广场) - Wúshān Guǎngchǎng Description: Wushan Square is a central plaza in Hangzhou surrounded by historical buildings, modern landmarks, and scenic vistas. Visitors can enjoy leisurely walks, cultural events, and panoramic views of West Lake, as well as explore nearby attractions such as museums, theaters, and shopping districts. China National Silk Museum (中国丝绸博物馆) - Zhōngguó Sīchóu Bówùguǎn Description: China National Silk Museum is dedicated to the history, art, and technology of silk production in China. The museum features extensive collections of silk artifacts, textiles, and cultural relics, as well as interactive exhibits, workshops, and demonstrations highlighting the craftsmanship and significance of silk in Chinese culture. Hangzhou Chenghuang Pavilion (杭州城隍阁) - Hángzhōu Chénghuáng Gé Description: Hangzhou Chenghuang Pavilion is a historic landmark dating back to the Song Dynasty, located in the heart of the city. The pavilion offers panoramic views of Hangzhou`s skyline, West Lake, and surrounding landmarks, as well as cultural exhibits, art displays, and traditional performances celebrating the city`s heritage. Hangzhou Confucius Temple (杭州文庙) - Hángzhōu Wénmiào Description: Hangzhou Confucius Temple is a tranquil sanctuary dedicated to the teachings and legacy of Confucius. The temple complex features traditional architecture, landscaped gardens, and cultural relics, providing a peaceful retreat for contemplation, study, and cultural exploration amidst the bustling city. Hangzhou Olympic Sports Center Stadium (杭州奥体中心) - Hángzhōu Ào Tǐ Zhōngxīn Description: Hangzhou Olympic Sports Center Stadium is a state-of-the-art sports and entertainment venue hosting major events, concerts, and sporting competitions. Visitors can attend live performances, sports matches, and cultural festivals, as well as explore the surrounding parklands, recreation facilities, and dining options. Hangzhou National Tea Museum (杭州茶叶博物馆) - Hángzhōu Cháyè Bówùguǎn Description: Hangzhou National Tea Museum is dedicated to the history, culture, and art of tea in China. The museum showcases tea artifacts, historical exhibits, and interactive displays, as well as traditional tea ceremonies, tastings, and workshops, offering insights into the significance of tea in Chinese society and its cultural heritage. Hangzhou Zoo (杭州动物园) - Hángzhōu Dòngwù Yuán Description: Hangzhou Zoo is home to a diverse collection of animal species from around the world, including rare and endangered species. Visitors can observe animals in naturalistic habitats, attend feeding sessions and animal shows, and enjoy family-friendly attractions such as playgrounds and picnic areas. Hangzhou Museum (杭州博物馆) - Hángzhōu Bówùguǎn Description: Hangzhou Museum is a cultural institution showcasing the history, art, and heritage of Hangzhou and the surrounding region. The museum`s exhibits include archaeological artifacts, fine art collections, and cultural relics, as well as interactive displays, educational programs, and temporary exhibitions highlighting various aspects of Hangzhou`s rich cultural legacy.
XinJiang: 20 Kid-Friendly Places to Visit Heavenly Lake (Tianchi) (天池 Tiānchí): A stunning alpine lake surrounded by snow-capped peaks, offering boat rides and hiking trails suitable for families. Kanas Lake (喀纳斯湖 Kānàsī Hú): A picturesque alpine lake with clear blue waters, surrounded by forests and mountains, offering boat rides and nature walks. Grasslands (草原 Cǎoyuán): Explore the vast grasslands of Xinjiang, where kids can run around freely and enjoy horseback riding and camping experiences. Gaochang Ancient City (高昌古城 Gāochāng Gǔchéng): Explore the ruins of an ancient Silk Road city, where kids can learn about history and archaeology through guided tours. Ancient City of Jiaohe (交河故城 Jiāohé Gùchéng): Discover the well-preserved ruins of an ancient desert city, offering a glimpse into Xinjiang`s rich history. Taklamakan Desert (塔克拉玛干沙漠 Tǎkèlāmǎgān Shāmò): Experience the vastness of the desert landscape with camel rides and sand dune adventures suitable for adventurous kids. Turpan Grape Valley (吐鲁番葡萄沟 Tǔlǔfān Pútáogōu): Explore vineyards and orchards in this lush valley, where kids can taste fresh fruits and learn about agriculture. Karakul Lake (喀拉库勒湖 Kālākùlè Hú): Marvel at the stunning scenery of this high-altitude lake, surrounded by snow-capped mountains, offering opportunities for photography and relaxation. Xinjiang Silk Road Museum (新疆丝绸之路博物馆 Xīnjiāng Sīchóu Zhī Lù Bówùguǎn): Learn about the history and culture of the Silk Road through interactive exhibits and artifacts. Flaming Mountains (火焰山 Huǒyàn Shān): Explore the unique red sandstone formations of the Flaming Mountains, which inspired ancient legends, suitable for outdoor exploration and photography. Emin Minaret (苏公塔 Sūgōngtǎ): Admire the architectural beauty of this historic minaret, offering panoramic views of the surrounding landscape and insights into Islamic culture. Altai Mountains (阿尔泰山脉 Ā`ěrtài Shānmài): Discover the natural beauty of the Altai Mountains, where kids can enjoy hiking, wildlife spotting, and camping adventures. Bayinbuluke Grassland (巴音布鲁克草原 Bāyīnbùlǔkè Cǎoyuán): Experience the vast grasslands of Bayinbuluke, where kids can participate in horseback riding, nomadic culture experiences, and yurt stays. Hemu Village (禾木村 Hémù Cūn): Visit this picturesque village nestled in the mountains, offering opportunities for hiking, photography, and cultural immersion. Bezeklik Thousand Buddha Caves (柏孜克里千佛洞 Bózīkèlǐ Qiānfódòng): Explore ancient Buddhist caves adorned with murals and sculptures, offering insights into the region`s religious history. Turpan Ancient City (吐鲁番古城 Tǔlǔfān Gǔchéng): Wander through the narrow streets and ancient ruins of Turpan`s old city, where kids can imagine life in ancient times. Tianshan Tianchi National Park (天山天池国家公园 Tiānshān Tiānchí Guójiā Gōngyuán): Explore the pristine natural beauty of Tianshan Tianchi National Park, offering hiking trails, boating, and scenic vistas. Yarkant Ancient City (莎车古城 Shāchē Gǔchéng): Step back in time as you explore the ancient city of Yarkant, known for its historic mosques, markets, and traditional architecture. Shipton`s Arch (希普顿拱门 Xīpǔdùn Gǒngmén): Marvel at the natural wonder of Shipton`s Arch, one of the largest natural arches in the world, offering breathtaking views and hiking opportunities. Xinjiang Regional Museum (新疆维吾尔自治区博物馆 Xīnjiāng Wéiwú`ěr Zìzhìqū Bówùguǎn): Learn about Xinjiang`s diverse cultures, history, and artifacts through exhibits and interactive displays suitable for families. XinJiang: 30 More Places to Visit Karakoram Highway (喀喇昆仑公路 Kālākūnlún Gōnglù): Embark on an epic road trip along one of the highest paved roads in the world, offering stunning mountain scenery and cultural encounters. Urumqi Grand Bazaar (乌鲁木齐大巴扎 Wūlǔmùqí Dàbāzhā): Explore the bustling markets of Urumqi, where kids can sample local delicacies, shop for souvenirs, and experience the vibrant atmosphere. Kizil Thousand Buddha Caves (克孜尔千佛洞 Kèzī`ěr Qiānfódòng): Marvel at the ancient Buddhist art and architecture of the Kizil Caves, known for their colorful murals and intricate carvings. Tuyoq Valley (吐峪沟 Tǔyùgōu): Discover the scenic beauty and cultural heritage of Tuyoq Valley, where kids can explore ancient ruins, visit local villages, and enjoy hiking trails. Gaochang Ruins (高昌故城 Gāochāng Gùchéng): Explore the ruins of an ancient Silk Road city, offering insights into the region`s history and architecture. Xinjiang Grape Valley (新疆葡萄沟 Xīnjiāng Pútáogōu): Visit vineyards and orchards in this picturesque valley, where kids can taste fresh fruits and learn about grape cultivation. Xinjiang Regional Museum (新疆维吾尔自治区博物馆 Xīnjiāng Wéiwú`ěr Zìzhìqū Bówùguǎn): Learn about Xinjiang`s diverse cultures, history, and artifacts through exhibits and interactive displays suitable for families. Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region Museum (新疆维吾尔自治区博物馆 Xīnjiāng Wéiwú`ěr Zìzhìqū Bówùguǎn): Explore the rich cultural heritage of the Uyghur people through exhibits on art, music, and traditions. Bayinbulak Grassland (巴音布鲁克草原 Bāyīnbùlǔkè Cǎoyuán): Experience the beauty of the grasslands, where kids can spot wildlife, ride horses, and enjoy traditional nomadic hospitality. Altai Mountains (阿尔泰山 Ā`ěrtài Shān): Discover the rugged beauty of the Altai Mountains, offering opportunities for hiking, mountaineering, and wildlife watching. Bezeklik Thousand Buddha Caves (柏孜克里千佛洞 Bózīkèlǐ Qiānfódòng): Explore ancient Buddhist caves adorned with murals and sculptures, offering insights into the region`s religious history. Grape Valley (葡萄沟 Pútáogōu): Visit vineyards and orchards in this picturesque valley, where kids can taste fresh fruits and learn about grape cultivation. Yarkant Ancient City (莎车古城 Shāchē Gǔchéng): Step back in time as you explore the ancient city of Yarkant, known for its historic mosques, markets, and traditional architecture. Shipton`s Arch (希普顿拱门 Xīpǔdùn Gǒngmén): Marvel at the natural wonder of Shipton`s Arch, one of the largest natural arches in the world, offering breathtaking views and hiking opportunities. Turpan Grape Valley (吐鲁番葡萄沟 Tǔlǔfān Pútáogōu): Explore vineyards and orchards in this lush valley, where kids can taste fresh fruits and learn about agriculture. Altun Mountains (阿尔金山 Ā`ěrjīn Shān): Discover the rugged beauty of the Altun Mountains, home to diverse ecosystems, including glaciers, lakes, and alpine meadows. Heavenly Lake (Tianchi) (天池 Tiānchí): A stunning alpine lake surrounded by snow-capped peaks, offering boat rides and hiking trails suitable for families. Ancient City of Jiaohe (交河故城 Jiāohé Gùchéng): Discover the well-preserved ruins of an ancient desert city, offering a glimpse into Xinjiang`s rich history. Emin Minaret (苏公塔 Sūgōngtǎ): Admire the architectural beauty of this historic minaret, offering panoramic views of the surrounding landscape and insights into Islamic culture. Bayinbuluke Grassland (巴音布鲁克草原 Bāyīnbùlǔkè Cǎoyuán): Experience the vast grasslands of Bayinbuluke, where kids can participate in horseback riding, nomadic culture experiences, and yurt stays. Hemu Village (禾木村 Hémù Cūn): Visit this picturesque village nestled in the mountains, offering opportunities for hiking, photography, and cultural immersion. Karakoram Highway (喀喇昆仑公路 Kālākūnlún Gōnglù): Embark on an epic road trip along one of the highest paved roads in the world, offering stunning mountain scenery and cultural encounters. Urumqi Grand Bazaar (乌鲁木齐大巴扎 Wūlǔmùqí Dàbāzhā): Explore the bustling markets of Urumqi, where kids can sample local delicacies, shop for souvenirs, and experience the vibrant atmosphere. Kizil Thousand Buddha Caves (克孜尔千佛洞 Kèzī`ěr Qiānfódòng): Marvel at the ancient Buddhist art and architecture of the Kizil Caves, known for their colorful murals and intricate carvings. Tuyoq Valley (吐峪沟 Tǔyùgōu): Discover the scenic beauty and cultural heritage of Tuyoq Valley, where kids can explore ancient ruins, visit local villages, and enjoy hiking trails. Gaochang Ruins (高昌故城 Gāochāng Gùchéng): Explore the ruins of an ancient Silk Road city, offering insights into the region`s history and architecture. Xinjiang Grape Valley (新疆葡萄沟 Xīnjiāng Pútáogōu): Visit vineyards and orchards in this picturesque valley, where kids can taste fresh fruits and learn about grape cultivation. Xinjiang Regional Museum (新疆维吾尔自治区博物馆 Xīnjiāng Wéiwú`ěr Zìzhìqū Bówùguǎn): Learn about Xinjiang`s diverse cultures, history, and artifacts through exhibits and interactive displays suitable for families.
With All By Ana Paula ...
30 popular drinks and beverages you might encounter in China, including traditional favorites and popular choices: Green Tea (绿茶, lǜchá) - Refreshing and commonly served in Chinese restaurants and households. Black Tea (红茶, hóngchá) - Another classic tea variety enjoyed across China. Oolong Tea (乌龙茶, wūlóngchá) - Semi-oxidized tea with a diverse range of flavors. Jasmine Tea (茉莉花茶, mòlìhuā chá) - Fragrant tea infused with jasmine flowers. Pu-erh Tea (普洱茶, pǔ`ěrchá) - A fermented tea known for its earthy flavor and health benefits. Chrysanthemum Tea (菊花茶, júhuā chá) - Light and floral tea made from chrysanthemum flowers. Hawthorn Juice (山楂汁, shānzhā zhī) - Tart and slightly sweet juice made from hawthorn berries. Coconut Water (椰子水, yēzi shuǐ) - Refreshing and hydrating natural drink from young coconuts. Soy Milk (豆浆, dòu jiāng) - Nutty and creamy beverage made from soybeans. Milk Tea (奶茶, nǎichá) - Popular sweetened tea with milk, often served cold or hot. Bubble Tea (珍珠奶茶, zhēnzhū nǎichá) - Sweetened tea or milk drink with chewy tapioca pearls. Lemon Tea (柠檬茶, níngméng chá) - Tea infused with lemon juice, often served cold. Lü Cheng Ice Tea (绿茶, lǜchá) - A popular bottled tea often found in convenience stores. Chrysanthemum Tea (菊花茶, júhuā chá) - Light and floral tea made from chrysanthemum flowers. Soy Milk (豆浆, dòu jiāng) - Nutty and creamy beverage made from soybeans. Milk Tea (奶茶, nǎichá) - Popular sweetened tea with milk, often served cold or hot. Bubble Tea (珍珠奶茶, zhēnzhū nǎichá) - Sweetened tea or milk drink with chewy tapioca pearls. Lemon Tea (柠檬茶, níngméng chá) - Tea infused with lemon juice, often served cold. Lü Cheng Ice Tea (绿茶冰, lǜchá bīng) - Bottled green tea served chilled with ice. Beer (啤酒, píjiǔ) - Commonly enjoyed alcoholic beverage in China, with popular brands like Tsingtao and Snow Beer. Rice Wine (米酒, mǐjiǔ) - Traditional Chinese alcoholic beverage made from fermented rice. Baijiu (白酒, báijiǔ) - Strong Chinese distilled spirit made from grains, commonly consumed during celebrations. Plum Juice (酸梅汤, suān méi tāng) - Tangy and sweet juice made from preserved plums. Winter Melon Tea (冬瓜茶, dōngguā chá) - Refreshing tea made from winter melon, often sweetened. Red Bean Soup (红豆汤, hóngdòu tāng) - Sweet soup made from boiled red beans, served hot or cold. Honey Citron Tea (柚子蜂蜜茶, yòuzi fēngmì chá) - Tea infused with honey and citron fruit, served hot. Laba Congee (腊八粥, làbā zhōu) - Sweet rice porridge traditionally enjoyed on Laba Festival, made with various ingredients like nuts and dried fruits. Wolfberry Tea (枸杞茶, gǒuqǐ chá) - Tea made from goji berries (wolfberries), known for their health benefits. Osmanthus Tea (桂花茶, guìhuā chá) - Fragrant tea made from osmanthus flowers, often sweetened. Lemon Water (柠檬水, níngméng shuǐ) - Simple infused water made with lemon slices and water. These are just a few examples of the diverse and delightful drinks you can enjoy in China. Each region may have its own specialties and variations of these beverages.

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100 traditional Chinese culture arts and crafts.           1. Calligraphy (书法, Shūfǎ)          Origin: Shang Dynasty          Ethnicity: Han          Chinese calligraphy, known as `shūfǎ` (书法) in Chinese, is the art of writing Chinese characters with brush and ink. This ancient craft has a long history in China and is highly regarded as a form of artistic expression. Calligraphy involves mastering various styles, such as seal script, clerical script, regular script, running script, and cursive script. Each style has its own unique characteristics and requires different techniques. Calligraphers practice for years to perfect their brush strokes, achieving balance, rhythm, and harmony in their work. Calligraphy is not only an art form but also a means of communication and a reflection of the writer`s personality and emotions. It is often used to create beautiful works of art that adorn homes, temples, and public spaces, showcasing the cultural heritage and artistic traditions of the Chinese people.                        2. Paper Cutting (剪纸, Jiǎnzhǐ)          Origin: Han Dynasty          Ethnicity: Han          Chinese paper cutting, known as `jiǎnzhǐ` (剪纸) in Chinese, is a traditional folk art that involves cutting intricate designs and patterns into paper. This ancient craft has been practiced in China for over a thousand years and is often used for decorative purposes during festivals and celebrations. The designs are typically created using red paper, which symbolizes good luck and happiness. Common motifs include flowers, animals, and scenes from folklore, each with its own symbolic meaning. Paper cutting requires precision and skill, as artisans use sharp scissors or knives to carefully cut the paper into delicate and intricate shapes. The finished pieces are often used to decorate windows, doors, and walls, adding a festive and artistic touch to the surroundings.                        3. Porcelain (瓷器, Cíqì)          Origin: Tang Dynasty          Ethnicity: Han          Chinese porcelain, known as `cíqì` (瓷器) in Chinese, is a highly refined and durable type of ceramic that has been produced in China for over a thousand years. The art of making porcelain involves mixing kaolin clay with other minerals, shaping the mixture into desired forms, and firing it at high temperatures to create a hard, translucent material. Porcelain is often decorated with intricate designs and glazes, ranging from simple, elegant patterns to elaborate, colorful scenes. Famous styles of Chinese porcelain include blue and white porcelain, celadon, and famille rose. Chinese porcelain is highly prized for its beauty, craftsmanship, and historical significance, and it has been exported and admired worldwide for centuries.                        4. Embroidery (刺绣, Cìxiù)          Origin: Han Dynasty          Ethnicity: Han, Miao, Zhuang          Chinese embroidery, known as `cìxiù` (刺绣) in Chinese, is a traditional textile art that involves stitching decorative patterns onto fabric using silk threads. This ancient craft has a rich history in China and is practiced by various ethnic groups, each with its own unique styles and techniques. Famous regional styles include Suzhou embroidery, known for its delicate and detailed work, and Miao embroidery, characterized by bold colors and geometric patterns. Embroidery is used to create beautiful clothing, accessories, and household items, often featuring intricate designs inspired by nature, mythology, and daily life. The craft requires precision, creativity, and a deep understanding of stitching techniques, reflecting the cultural heritage and artistic skills of the artisans.                        5. Chinese Knots (中国结, Zhōngguó Jié)          Origin: Tang Dynasty          Ethnicity: Han          Chinese knotting, known as `zhōngguó jié` (中国结) in Chinese, is a decorative art form that involves tying intricate knots using silk or nylon cords. This ancient craft has a rich history in China and is often used to create decorative ornaments, accessories, and gifts. Chinese knots come in various shapes and designs, each with its own symbolic meaning. Common knot designs include the Pan Chang knot, which represents eternity, and the Double Coin knot, symbolizing wealth and prosperity. The craft requires patience, precision, and a thorough understanding of knotting techniques. Chinese knotting is often passed down through generations as a cultural tradition and is widely practiced during festivals, weddings, and other auspicious occasions.                        6. Chinese Opera Masks (戏曲面具, Xìqǔ Miànjù)          Origin: Tang Dynasty          Ethnicity: Han          Chinese opera masks, known as `xìqǔ miànjù` (戏曲面具) in Chinese, are an essential element of traditional Chinese theater. These colorful masks are used to represent different characters and emotions in opera performances, allowing actors to convey their roles more vividly. Each mask design has its own unique characteristics and symbolism. Red masks symbolize loyalty and bravery, black masks represent integrity and righteousness, and white masks signify cunning and treachery. Chinese opera masks are typically made from materials such as paper-mâché, clay, or wood, and are intricately painted with bold, stylized designs. The masks help audiences distinguish between characters and understand their personalities and motivations, adding depth and drama to the performances.                        7. Seal Carving (篆刻, Zhuànkè)          Origin: Shang Dynasty          Ethnicity: Han          Seal carving, known as `zhuànkè` (篆刻) in Chinese, is the art of engraving characters onto stone, metal, or wood to create seals, which are used for stamping documents and artwork. Seals are an important part of Chinese culture, often bearing the name of the owner or a meaningful phrase. The practice involves designing the seal, carving the characters in reverse, and polishing the surface for a smooth finish. Seal carving requires precision and skill, as the characters must be carved accurately and artistically. Seals are used by artists to sign their works and by individuals for official and personal purposes, reflecting their identity and status.                        8. Bamboo Weaving (竹编, Zhúbiān)          Origin: Han Dynasty          Ethnicity: Han, Dai          Bamboo weaving, known as `zhúbiān` (竹编) in Chinese, is the art of creating functional and decorative items from bamboo strips, including baskets, mats, and furniture. The craft involves splitting bamboo into thin strips, which are then woven together using various techniques to form intricate patterns and shapes. Bamboo weaving is practiced in many regions of China, with each area developing its own unique styles and products. The Dai people, for example, are known for their colorful and durable bamboo baskets. This sustainable craft highlights the versatility of bamboo as a material and the skill of the artisans in transforming it into everyday objects.                        9. Shadow Puppetry (皮影戏, Píyǐngxì)          Origin: Han Dynasty          Ethnicity: Han          Shadow puppetry, known as `píyǐngxì` (皮影戏) in Chinese, is a traditional Chinese form of storytelling using flat, articulated figures to create shadows on a screen. Performers manipulate the puppets behind the screen while narrating the story and providing voices for the characters. The puppets are typically made from leather or paper, intricately cut and painted to depict characters from folklore, mythology, and history. Shadow puppetry combines music, singing, and storytelling, creating a unique and immersive cultural experience. This art form has been recognized by UNESCO as an intangible cultural heritage, reflecting its importance in Chinese cultural traditions.                        10. Blue and White Porcelain (青花瓷, Qīnghuācí)          Origin: Yuan Dynasty          Ethnicity: Han          Blue and white porcelain, known as `qīnghuācí` (青花瓷) in Chinese,     is a type of Chinese ceramic that features blue designs on a white background. This style of porcelain became popular during the Yuan Dynasty and reached its peak during the Ming and Qing Dynasties. The blue designs are created using cobalt oxide, which is applied to the surface of the porcelain before it is glazed and fired at high temperatures. Common motifs include floral patterns, landscapes, and scenes from Chinese folklore. Blue and white porcelain is highly prized for its beauty, craftsmanship, and historical significance, and it remains one of the most recognizable and admired forms of Chinese ceramics worldwide.                        11. Silk Weaving (丝织, Sīzhī)          Origin: Han Dynasty          Ethnicity: Han          Silk weaving, known as `sīzhī` (丝织) in Chinese, is the process of creating luxurious textiles from silk threads. This ancient craft has been practiced in China for thousands of years and played a significant role in the country`s history and economy. The process begins with raising silkworms to produce silk cocoons, which are then unwound to obtain silk threads. These threads are dyed and woven into intricate patterns using traditional looms. Silk weaving requires skill and precision, with artisans creating beautiful fabrics that are used for clothing, accessories, and home decor. The Silk Road, an ancient trade route, was named after this valuable textile, highlighting its importance in Chinese culture and global trade.                        12. Peking Opera (京剧, Jīngjù)          Origin: Qing Dynasty          Ethnicity: Han          Peking Opera, known as `jīngjù` (京剧) in Chinese, is a traditional form of Chinese theater that combines music, singing, acting, and acrobatics. This art form originated in Beijing during the Qing Dynasty and has since become one of China`s most famous cultural treasures. Peking Opera performances feature elaborate costumes, vibrant makeup, and stylized movements, with actors portraying historical, mythological, and fictional characters. The music is performed using traditional Chinese instruments, such as the jinghu (a two-stringed fiddle) and the pipa (a plucked lute). Peking Opera is known for its distinctive vocal style and complex choreography, requiring years of training for performers to master. It remains a beloved and influential part of Chinese cultural heritage.                        13. Woodblock Printing (木版画, Mùbǎnhuà)          Origin: Tang Dynasty          Ethnicity: Han          Woodblock printing, known as `mùbǎnhuà` (木版画) in Chinese, is a traditional Chinese technique for printing text, images, and patterns using carved wooden blocks. This method was widely used for producing books, artworks, and textiles. The process involves carving the desired design into a wooden block, applying ink to the surface, and pressing it onto paper or fabric. Woodblock printing played a crucial role in the dissemination of knowledge and culture in ancient China. The prints often feature intricate details and vibrant colors, showcasing the skill and artistry of the craftsmen. This technique laid the foundation for modern printing methods and remains an important part of China`s cultural heritage.                        14. Paper Lanterns (纸灯笼, Zhǐdēnglóng)          Origin: Eastern Han Dynasty          Ethnicity: Han          Paper lanterns are traditional Chinese decorative items made from paper or silk, often used during festivals and celebrations. They come in various shapes and sizes, with designs ranging from simple to elaborate. The lanterns are typically illuminated by candles, oil lamps, or electric lights, creating a warm and festive atmosphere. Paper lanterns are especially popular during the Lantern Festival, which marks the end of the Chinese New Year celebrations. The craft involves constructing the lantern frame, covering it with paper or silk, and decorating it with paintings, calligraphy, or cut-outs. Paper lanterns symbolize good fortune, happiness, and the reunion of family.                        15. Silver Ornaments (银饰, Yínshì)          Origin: Ming Dynasty          Ethnicity: Miao, Dong, Yao          Silver ornaments, known as `yínshì` (银饰) in Chinese, are traditional jewelry pieces crafted by ethnic minorities in China, such as the Miao, Dong, and Yao people. These ornaments include earrings, necklaces, bracelets, and headdresses, often featuring intricate designs and symbols. The craft involves techniques such as casting, hammering, engraving, and filigree to create detailed and delicate patterns. Silver ornaments are worn during festivals, weddings, and other important events, symbolizing beauty, wealth, and social status. They are also believed to have protective and auspicious properties. The craftsmanship of silver ornaments showcases the cultural heritage and artistic skills of these ethnic groups.                        16. Tibetan Thangka Painting (唐卡, Tángkǎ)          Origin: 7th Century          Ethnicity: Tibetan          Thangka painting, known as `tángkǎ` (唐卡) in Chinese, is a traditional Tibetan art form that involves creating religious paintings on cloth, depicting Buddhist deities, mandalas, and scenes from scriptures. Thangkas are used for meditation, teaching, and as objects of veneration in monasteries and homes. The creation of a thangka involves meticulous drawing, painting, and sometimes embroidery, using natural pigments and gold. The process is highly ritualistic and requires a deep understanding of Buddhist iconography and symbolism. Thangka paintings are known for their vibrant colors, intricate details, and spiritual significance, reflecting the rich cultural and religious heritage of the Tibetan people.                        17. Dragon Dance (舞龙, Wǔlóng)          Origin: Han Dynasty          Ethnicity: Han          The dragon dance, known as `wǔlóng` (舞龙) in Chinese, is a traditional Chinese performance that involves a team of dancers manipulating a large, flexible dragon puppet. The dance is typically performed during festivals such as Chinese New Year and the Lantern Festival to bring good luck and prosperity. The dragon, made of fabric and bamboo, can be over 30 meters long, with dancers using poles to animate its movements. The performance is accompanied by drums, gongs, and cymbals, creating a lively and festive atmosphere. The dragon dance symbolizes power, strength, and good fortune, reflecting the cultural importance of dragons in Chinese mythology.                        18. Paper Fans (纸扇, Zhǐshàn)          Origin: Han Dynasty          Ethnicity: Han          Paper fans, known as `zhǐshàn` (纸扇) in Chinese, are traditional Chinese accessories made from paper or silk, mounted on bamboo or wooden frames. They are used for cooling, as well as for decorative and ceremonial purposes. Paper fans come in various shapes and sizes, with designs that often feature paintings, calligraphy, and poems. The craft involves constructing the fan frame, attaching the paper or silk, and decorating it with artistic elements. Paper fans are popular during festivals and as gifts, symbolizing elegance and cultural refinement. They are also used in traditional dance performances, adding grace and fluidity to the movements.                        19. Yangko Dance (秧歌, Yānggē)          Origin: Song Dynasty          Ethnicity: Han          Yangko dance, known as `yānggē` (秧歌) in Chinese, is a traditional Chinese folk dance performed during festivals and celebrations, especially during the Lunar New Year. The dance is characterized by its lively and rhythmic movements, with dancers often carrying colorful fans or handkerchiefs. Yangko dance performances are typically accompanied by traditional music played on instruments such as drums, gongs, and flutes. The dance movements mimic agricultural activities and are meant to bring good harvests and prosperity. Yangko dance reflects the joyous spirit of the people and their connection to the land, showcasing the vibrancy and diversity of Chinese folk culture.                        20. Chinese New Year Woodblock Prints (年画, Niánhuà)          Origin: Song Dynasty          Ethnicity    : Han          Chinese New Year woodblock prints, known as `niánhuà` (年画) in Chinese, are traditional folk art pieces created to celebrate the Lunar New Year. These prints depict auspicious symbols, deities, and scenes of prosperity and happiness, and are used to decorate homes and temples. The process involves carving the design into a wooden block, applying ink or paint, and pressing it onto paper. The prints are often brightly colored and feature intricate details. Niánhuà prints are believed to bring good luck and ward off evil spirits, reflecting the cultural significance and festive spirit of the Chinese New Year celebrations.                        21. Kites (风筝, Fēngzhēng)          Origin: Han Dynasty          Ethnicity: Han          Kites, known as `fēngzhēng` (风筝) in Chinese, are traditional Chinese flying objects made from bamboo frames covered with paper or silk. Kites are used for recreational purposes, as well as for cultural and religious events. The craft of kite-making involves designing the frame, attaching the covering, and painting the kite with colorful patterns and motifs. Common designs include dragons, birds, and flowers. Kite flying is a popular activity during the Qingming Festival and other festivals, symbolizing the release of worries and the connection between the earthly and the divine. Chinese kites are admired for their beauty, craftsmanship, and cultural significance.                        22. Chinese Puppetry (木偶戏, Mù`ǒuxì)          Origin: Han Dynasty          Ethnicity: Han          Chinese puppetry, known as `mù`ǒuxì` (木偶戏) in Chinese, is a traditional form of theater that uses puppets to tell stories and entertain audiences. Puppetry has a long history in China, with various regional styles and techniques. The puppets are typically made from wood, clay, or cloth, and are intricately crafted and painted. Performers manipulate the puppets using strings, rods, or their hands, bringing them to life with expressive movements and voices. Chinese puppetry often features stories from folklore, mythology, and history, combining music, singing, and dialogue to create engaging performances. This art form reflects the creativity and cultural heritage of the Chinese people.                        23. Cloisonné (景泰蓝, Jǐngtàilán)          Origin: Yuan Dynasty          Ethnicity: Han          Cloisonné, known as `jǐngtàilán` (景泰蓝) in Chinese, is a traditional Chinese art form that involves decorating metal objects with enamel. The process begins by creating a design with thin metal wires, which are soldered onto a metal surface to form compartments (cloisons). These compartments are then filled with enamel paste and fired in a kiln. The enamel hardens into a glossy, colorful finish, and the piece is polished to reveal the intricate design. Cloisonné is used to create a variety of decorative items, including vases, bowls, and jewelry. This craft is admired for its beauty, complexity, and historical significance, reflecting the artistic achievements of Chinese artisans.                        24. Dough Sculpture (面塑, Miànsù)          Origin: Tang Dynasty          Ethnicity: Han          Dough sculpture, known as `miànsù` (面塑) in Chinese, is a traditional folk art that involves shaping and molding colored dough into various shapes and figures. This art form originated in China during the Tang Dynasty and has since evolved into a popular form of decorative and ceremonial art. Dough sculptures are typically made from wheat or rice flour dough mixed with water and pigments to create vibrant colors. Artisans use their hands and simple tools to shape the dough into intricate designs, often depicting animals, mythological creatures, and scenes from daily life. Once the sculptures are completed, they are dried or baked to preserve them. Dough sculpture is often used to decorate temples, homes, and festive celebrations, adding a touch of color and whimsy to the surroundings.                        25. Miao Embroidery (苗绣, Miáoxiù)          Origin: Ming Dynasty          Ethnicity: Miao          Miao embroidery, known as `miáoxiù` (苗绣) in Chinese, is a traditional textile art practiced by the Miao ethnic group. This craft involves stitching intricate patterns onto fabric using brightly colored threads. The designs often feature motifs inspired by nature, mythology, and daily life, reflecting the cultural heritage and artistic traditions of the Miao people. Miao embroidery is used to create clothing, accessories, and household items, often incorporating techniques such as cross-stitch, applique, and batik. The embroidery is highly detailed and vibrant, showcasing the skill and creativity of the artisans. Miao embroidery is an important cultural tradition, passed down through generations and celebrated for its beauty and craftsmanship.                        26. Chinese Brush Painting (国画, Guóhuà)          Origin: Han Dynasty          Ethnicity: Han          Chinese brush painting, known as `guóhuà` (国画) in Chinese, is a traditional art form that uses brushes, ink, and pigments to create images on paper or silk. This painting style emphasizes the use of line, brushwork, and composition to convey the essence of the subject, rather than realistic details. Common themes include landscapes, flowers, birds, and figures, often accompanied by calligraphy and seals. Chinese brush painting requires mastery of various techniques, such as brush pressure, ink control, and composition. The art form reflects the philosophical and aesthetic principles of Chinese culture, emphasizing harmony, balance, and the beauty of nature.                        27. Chinese Seal (印章, Yìnzhāng)          Origin: Shang Dynasty          Ethnicity: Han          The Chinese seal, known as `yìnzhāng` (印章) in Chinese, is a traditional tool used for stamping documents, artwork, and personal items. Seals are typically made from materials such as stone, metal, or wood, and are carved with characters or symbols representing the owner`s name, title, or an auspicious phrase. The art of seal carving involves designing the seal, carving the characters in reverse, and polishing the surface for a smooth finish. Seals are an important part of Chinese culture, used by artists to sign their works and by individuals for official and personal purposes. The craft of seal carving requires precision and skill, reflecting the cultural and artistic heritage of China.                        28. Chinese Tie-Dyeing (扎染, Zhārǎn)          Origin: Han Dynasty          Ethnicity: Bai, Yi          Chinese tie-dyeing, known as `zhārǎn` (扎染) in Chinese, is an ancient textile dyeing technique that involves tying or binding sections of fabric before dyeing to create patterns and designs. This art form has a long history in China and is practiced by various ethnic groups, including the Bai and Yi people. The process begins with preparing the fabric, which is typically made from natural materials such as cotton or silk. Artisans then use different tying and binding techniques to create intricate patterns, often inspired by nature, mythology, and traditional symbols. After tying, the fabric is submerged in dye baths, with each color applied in sequence. Once dyed, the fabric is washed and the ties are removed, revealing the intricate designs. Chinese tie-dyeing produces vibrant and unique textiles that are used for clothing, accessories, and decorative items, reflecting the rich cultural heritage and artistic creativity of the Chinese people.                        29. Chinese Folk Painting (民间绘画, Mínjiān Huìhuà)          Origin: Han Dynasty          Ethnicity: Han          Chinese folk painting, known as `mínjiān huìhuà` (民间绘画) in Chinese, is a traditional art form that reflects the daily life, customs, and beliefs of the people. Folk paintings often feature vibrant colors and simple, expressive lines, depicting scenes from nature, mythology, and local festivals. The art form is practiced across various regions of China, with each area developing its own unique styles and themes. Folk paintings are commonly used to decorate homes, temples    , and public spaces, adding a touch of beauty and cultural significance to the surroundings. This art form embodies the creativity and spirit of the people, showcasing their connection to their heritage and community.                        30. Chinese Paper-Cutting (剪纸, Jiǎnzhǐ)          Origin: Han Dynasty          Ethnicity: Han          Chinese paper-cutting, known as `jiǎnzhǐ` (剪纸) in Chinese, is a traditional folk art that involves cutting intricate designs into paper using scissors or knives. This craft has been practiced in China for over 1,500 years and is often associated with festivals, celebrations, and cultural rituals. Paper-cut designs range from simple to elaborate, featuring motifs such as animals, flowers, and auspicious symbols. The process involves folding the paper and cutting along specific lines to create symmetrical patterns. Paper-cuts are used to decorate windows, doors, and walls, adding a festive and artistic touch to homes and public spaces. This art form reflects the skill and creativity of the artisans, as well as the cultural values and traditions of Chinese society.                        31. Tibetan Carpet Weaving (藏毯, Zàngtǎn)          Origin: 7th Century          Ethnicity: Tibetan          Tibetan carpet weaving, known as `zàngtǎn` (藏毯) in Chinese, is a traditional craft practiced by Tibetan people. This art form involves weaving carpets from wool, often featuring intricate patterns and vibrant colors inspired by nature, religion, and daily life. The weaving process begins with spinning and dyeing the wool, followed by setting up the loom and weaving the carpet by hand. Tibetan carpets are known for their durability, softness, and unique designs, reflecting the cultural and artistic heritage of the Tibetan people. These carpets are used for practical purposes, such as floor coverings and wall hangings, as well as for ceremonial and decorative purposes.                        32. Chinese Opera Masks (戏曲面具, Xìqǔ Miànjù)          Origin: Song Dynasty          Ethnicity: Han          Chinese opera masks, known as `xìqǔ miànjù` (戏曲面具) in Chinese, are traditional masks used in various forms of Chinese opera. These masks are painted with vivid colors and patterns, representing different characters, emotions, and traits. The art of mask-making involves sculpting the mask from materials such as wood, paper-mache, or metal, and then painting it with intricate designs. Each color and pattern has specific meanings, with red symbolizing loyalty, black representing integrity, and white indicating treachery. Chinese opera masks are an essential part of the performance, enhancing the visual and emotional impact of the characters and stories. This craft reflects the rich cultural and artistic traditions of Chinese theater.                        33. Yao Embroidery (瑶绣, Yáoxiù)          Origin: Tang Dynasty          Ethnicity: Yao          Yao embroidery, known as `yáoxiù` (瑶绣) in Chinese, is a traditional textile art practiced by the Yao ethnic group. This craft involves stitching intricate patterns onto fabric using brightly colored threads. The designs often feature motifs inspired by nature, mythology, and daily life, reflecting the cultural heritage and artistic traditions of the Yao people. Yao embroidery is used to create clothing, accessories, and household items, often incorporating techniques such as cross-stitch, applique, and batik. The embroidery is highly detailed and vibrant, showcasing the skill and creativity of the artisans. Yao embroidery is an important cultural tradition, passed down through generations and celebrated for its beauty and craftsmanship.                        34. Nuo Opera (傩戏, Nuóxì)          Origin: Shang Dynasty          Ethnicity: Han          Nuo opera, known as `nuóxì` (傩戏) in Chinese, is a traditional form of Chinese theater that combines drama, music, dance, and acrobatics. This ancient art form originated during the Shang Dynasty and is closely associated with ritual and religious ceremonies. Nuo opera performances feature elaborate costumes, masks, and props, with actors portraying gods, spirits, and mythological figures. The stories often involve themes of good versus evil, exorcism, and blessings. Nuo opera is known for its dynamic and expressive style, requiring performers to master a range of skills. This art form reflects the deep cultural and spiritual heritage of the Chinese people, serving as a bridge between the human and the divine.                        35. Chinese Shadow Puppetry (皮影戏, Píyǐngxì)          Origin: Han Dynasty          Ethnicity: Han          Chinese shadow puppetry, known as `píyǐngxì` (皮影戏) in Chinese, is a traditional form of storytelling that uses flat, articulated figures made from leather or paper to create shadows on a screen. This art form has been practiced in China for over a thousand years and is known for its intricate craftsmanship and expressive performances. The puppets are manipulated by skilled puppeteers using rods or strings, bringing the characters to life with movement and dialogue. Shadow puppetry performances often depict stories from folklore, mythology, and history, accompanied by music and singing. This craft reflects the creativity and cultural heritage of the Chinese people, providing a unique and captivating form of entertainment.                          36. Suzhou Embroidery (苏绣, Sūxiù)          Origin: Han Dynasty          Ethnicity: Han          Suzhou embroidery, known as `sūxiù` (苏绣), is one of the most renowned embroidery styles in China. Originating in Suzhou, it is celebrated for its delicate and refined technique, using fine silk threads to create lifelike images. The art requires immense skill and patience, with artisans often spending months to complete a single piece. Suzhou embroidery often features landscapes, flowers, and birds, showcasing the natural beauty and artistic talent of the region.                        37. Qiang Embroidery (羌绣, Qiāngxiù)          Origin: Qing Dynasty          Ethnicity: Qiang          Qiang embroidery, known as `qiāngxiù` (羌绣), is a traditional craft of the Qiang ethnic group. It is known for its bold colors and intricate patterns, often depicting geometric shapes, flowers, and animals. The embroidery is used to decorate clothing, accessories, and household items. Qiang embroidery reflects the rich cultural heritage and artistic expression of the Qiang people, with each piece telling a unique story.                        38. Shu Embroidery (蜀绣, Shǔxiù)          Origin: Han Dynasty          Ethnicity: Han          Shu embroidery, known as `shǔxiù` (蜀绣), originates from Sichuan Province and is famous for its smooth and elegant style. It uses fine silk threads and a variety of stitching techniques to create detailed and vibrant images. Common themes include flowers, birds, and traditional Chinese symbols. Shu embroidery is highly valued for its artistic beauty and technical excellence, often used to create decorative items and gifts.                        39. Chinese Knotting (中国结, Zhōngguó Jié)          Origin: Tang Dynasty          Ethnicity: Han          Chinese knotting, known as `zhōngguó jié` (中国结), is a traditional craft that involves creating decorative knots using a single piece of cord. Each knot has its own symbolic meaning, often representing good luck, prosperity, and longevity. The knots are used to create jewelry, ornaments, and home decorations. This craft requires precision and skill, with artisans using various techniques to create intricate and beautiful designs.                        40. Dong Embroidery (侗绣, Dòngxiù)          Origin: Ming Dynasty          Ethnicity: Dong          Dong embroidery, known as `dòngxiù` (侗绣), is a traditional textile art of the Dong ethnic group. It is known for its vibrant colors and detailed patterns, often depicting scenes from nature, daily life, and Dong folklore. The embroidery is used to decorate clothing, accessories, and household items. Dong embroidery reflects the rich cultural heritage and artistic traditions of the Dong people, showcasing their connection to their environment and community.                        41. Blue Calico Printing (蓝印花布, Lán Yìn Huā Bù)          Origin: Song Dynasty          Ethnicity: Han          Blue calico printing, known as `lán yìn huā bù` (蓝印花布), is a traditional Chinese textile art that involves printing patterns onto cotton fabric using indigo dye. The process involves creating a stencil, applying a resist paste, and dyeing the fabric. The result is a beautiful blue and white design, often featuring floral and geometric patterns. Blue calico is used for clothing, home decor, and ceremonial items, reflecting the cultural heritage and artistic creativity of Chinese artisans.                        42. Paper Fan Making (扇子制作, Shànzi Zhìzuò)          Origin: Han Dynasty          Ethnicity: Han          Paper fan making, known as `shànzi zhìzuò` (扇子制作), is a traditional Chinese craft that involves creating beautiful and functional fans from paper and bamboo. The fans are often painted with calligraphy, landscapes, and floral designs. This craft requires precision and artistry, with each fan being a unique piece of art. Paper fans are used for cooling, decoration, and as cultural symbols in Chinese society.                        43. Chinese Lantern Making (灯笼制作, Dēnglóng Zhìzuò)          Origin: Han Dynasty          Ethnicity: Han          Chinese lantern making, known as `dēnglóng zhìzuò` (灯笼制作), is a traditional craft that involves creating decorative lanterns from paper, silk, and bamboo. The lanterns are often brightly colored and feature intricate designs, symbolizing prosperity, good luck, and celebration. Lanterns are commonly used during festivals, such as the Lantern Festival and Chinese New Year, to add a festive and joyful atmosphere.                        44. Tujia Brocade (土家织锦, Tǔjiā Zhījǐn)          Origin: Ming Dynasty          Ethnicity: Tujia          Tujia brocade, known as `tǔjiā zhījǐn` (土家织锦), is a traditional textile art of the Tujia ethnic group. It involves weaving colorful patterns and designs into fabric using silk and cotton threads. The brocade is known for its durability, bright colors, and intricate patterns, often depicting flowers, animals, and geometric shapes. Tujia brocade is used to create clothing, accessories, and home decor items, reflecting the cultural heritage and artistic traditions of the Tujia people.                        45. Chinese Porcelain (瓷器, Cíqì)          Origin: Tang Dynasty          Ethnicity: Han          Chinese porcelain, known as `cíqì` (瓷器), is one of China`s most famous and influential art forms. Porcelain involves shaping and firing clay at high temperatures to create durable and beautiful ceramic wares. The art of porcelain-making reached its peak during the Tang and Song Dynasties, with famous kilns such as Jingdezhen producing exquisite pieces. Chinese porcelain is admired for its delicate beauty, intricate designs, and technical excellence, often featuring blue-and-white patterns, floral motifs, and scenes from nature and mythology.                        46. Hanfu Making (汉服制作, Hànfú Zhìzuò)          Origin: Han Dynasty          Ethnicity: Han          Hanfu making, known as `hànfú zhìzuò` (汉服制作), is the traditional craft of creating Han Chinese clothing. Hanfu refers to the historical clothing worn by the Han people, characterized by flowing robes, wide sleeves, and intricate patterns. The craft involves designing, cutting, and sewing fabric to create garments that reflect the elegance and cultural heritage of ancient China. Hanfu is experiencing a revival in modern times, with enthusiasts wearing it for cultural events, festivals, and daily life, celebrating Chinese history and identity.                        47. Yixing Clay Teapots (宜兴紫砂壶, Y    íxìng Zǐshā Hú)          Origin: Ming Dynasty          Ethnicity: Han          Yixing clay teapots, known as `yíxìng zǐshā hú` (宜兴紫砂壶), are traditional Chinese teapots made from purple clay found in Yixing, Jiangsu Province. These teapots are prized for their unique ability to enhance the flavor of tea. The craft involves shaping the clay by hand or using molds, followed by firing at high temperatures. Yixing teapots are known for their unglazed surfaces, which allow the clay to absorb and release the aroma of the tea. They are highly collectible and valued for their beauty, functionality, and cultural significance.                        48. Chinese Ruyi Scepter (如意, Rúyì)          Origin: Han Dynasty          Ethnicity: Han          The Chinese ruyi scepter, known as `rúyì` (如意), is a traditional symbol of power and good fortune. The scepter is often carved from materials such as jade, wood, or ivory, and features a curved shape with a cloud-like head. Ruyi scepters were used by scholars, officials, and emperors as a status symbol and a token of blessings. The name `ruyi` means `as you wish,` reflecting its auspicious connotations. This craft combines artistry with cultural symbolism, representing authority, prosperity, and harmony.                        49. Chinese Calligraphy (书法, Shūfǎ)          Origin: Shang Dynasty          Ethnicity: Han          Chinese calligraphy, known as `shūfǎ` (书法), is the artistic practice of writing Chinese characters with brush and ink. It is considered one of the highest forms of Chinese art, requiring skill, concentration, and creativity. Calligraphy involves writing characters in various styles, such as seal script, clerical script, cursive script, and regular script. Each style has its own rules and aesthetics. Calligraphy is not only a means of communication but also an expression of the writer`s personality, emotions, and cultural identity. It is often displayed on scrolls, fans, and other mediums, admired for its beauty and artistic value.                        50. Chinese Seal Engraving (篆刻, Zhuànkè)          Origin: Zhou Dynasty          Ethnicity: Han          Chinese seal engraving, known as `zhuànkè` (篆刻), is a traditional art form that involves carving characters into seals made of materials such as stone, ivory, or jade. Seals are used to imprint an individual`s name or a decorative design on documents, artwork, and other items. The art of seal engraving requires precision and skill, with the engraver using specialized tools to create detailed and intricate designs. Seals are an important aspect of Chinese culture, symbolizing authority, authenticity, and personal identity.                        51. Traditional Chinese Medicine (中医, Zhōngyī)          Origin: Han Dynasty          Ethnicity: Han          Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM), known as `zhōngyī` (中医), is a holistic system of healthcare that has been practiced in China for thousands of years. TCM includes various therapies such as herbal medicine, acupuncture, cupping, and qigong. The principles of TCM are based on balancing the body`s energy, known as `qi,` and maintaining harmony between the body`s internal organs and the external environment. TCM is deeply rooted in Chinese philosophy and culture, emphasizing the interconnectedness of the body, mind, and spirit.                        52. Chinese Pottery (陶器, Táoqì)          Origin: Neolithic Era          Ethnicity: Han          Chinese pottery, known as `táoqì` (陶器), has a long and rich history, dating back to the Neolithic era. Pottery involves shaping and firing clay to create various vessels and objects, such as jars, bowls, and figurines. Chinese pottery is known for its diversity of styles, techniques, and glazes, with famous types including Tang sancai (three-colored) pottery and Cizhou ware. Pottery reflects the cultural and artistic achievements of different historical periods and regions in China, serving both practical and decorative purposes.                        53. Naxi Dongba Painting (纳西东巴画, Nàxī Dōngbā Huà)          Origin: Yuan Dynasty          Ethnicity: Naxi          Naxi Dongba painting, known as `nàxī dōngbā huà` (纳西东巴画), is a traditional art form of the Naxi ethnic group in Yunnan Province. It involves creating religious and ceremonial paintings on paper or cloth, using natural pigments and simple brushes. Dongba paintings often depict deities, rituals, and symbols from Naxi mythology and culture. This art form is closely associated with the Dongba religion and its priests, who use the paintings in ceremonies and as teaching tools. Dongba painting reflects the spiritual and cultural heritage of the Naxi people, preserving their traditions and beliefs.                        54. Chinese Sugar Painting (糖画, Táng Huà)          Origin: Ming Dynasty          Ethnicity: Han          Chinese sugar painting, known as `táng huà` (糖画), is a traditional folk art that involves creating intricate designs and figures using melted sugar. The artist uses a small ladle to pour and manipulate the sugar on a marble or metal surface, forming shapes such as animals, flowers, and symbols. Once the sugar cools and hardens, the delicate and edible artworks are ready to be enjoyed. Sugar painting is a popular attraction at Chinese festivals and fairs, delighting both children and adults with its sweet and artistic creations.                        55. Chinese Cloisonné (景泰蓝, Jǐngtàilán)          Origin: Ming Dynasty          Ethnicity: Han          Chinese cloisonné, known as `jǐngtàilán` (景泰蓝), is a traditional enamelware craft that involves decorating metal objects with colorful enamel. The process includes creating a design with thin metal wires, filling the spaces with enamel paste, and firing the object to fuse the enamel to the metal. The result is a beautiful and durable piece with intricate patterns and vibrant colors. Cloisonné is used to create vases, bowls, jewelry, and decorative items, showcasing the artistry and technical skill of Chinese artisans.                        56. Miao Silverwork (苗银, Miáoyín)          Origin: Ming Dynasty          Ethnicity: Miao          Miao silverwork, known as `miáoyín` (苗银), is a traditional craft of the Miao ethnic group, renowned for its intricate and beautiful silver jewelry. Miao silverwork includes necklaces, bracelets, earrings, and headdresses, often featuring detailed patterns and motifs inspired by nature and Miao mythology. The craft involves techniques such as hammering, engraving, and filigree work. Miao silver jewelry is not only a symbol of beauty and status but also an important aspect of cultural identity and heritage.                        57. Tibetan Thangka Painting (唐卡, Tángkǎ)          Origin: 7th Century          Ethnicity: Tibetan          Tibetan Thangka painting, known as `tángkǎ` (唐卡), is a traditional form of Buddhist art that involves creating religious paintings on cloth or paper. Thangkas often depict deities, mandalas, and scenes from Buddhist mythology. The paintings are created using natural pigments and detailed brushwork, with the process requiring precision and devotion. Thangkas are used in religious ceremonies, meditation, and as teaching tools, reflecting the spiritual and artistic traditions of Tibetan Buddhism.                        58. Chinese Gourd Painting (    葫芦画, Húlú Huà)          Origin: Qing Dynasty          Ethnicity: Han          Chinese gourd painting, known as `húlú huà` (葫芦画), is a folk art that involves decorating gourds with intricate designs and patterns. The process includes cleaning and drying the gourds, then using techniques such as painting, carving, and pyrography to create the artwork. Gourd paintings often feature themes from nature, folklore, and Chinese mythology. The decorated gourds are used as ornaments, containers, and symbolic gifts, representing good fortune and prosperity.                        59. Chinese Jade Carving (玉雕, Yùdiāo)          Origin: Neolithic Era          Ethnicity: Han          Chinese jade carving, known as `yùdiāo` (玉雕), is an ancient and highly esteemed art form that involves sculpting jade into various objects and ornaments. Jade is prized for its beauty, durability, and symbolic significance, often associated with purity, longevity, and status. The carving process requires great skill and precision, with artisans creating intricate designs and detailed figures. Jade carvings include jewelry, figurines, seals, and ceremonial items, reflecting the cultural and artistic heritage of China.                        60. Chinese Woodblock Printing (木刻版画, Mùkè Bǎnhuà)          Origin: Tang Dynasty          Ethnicity: Han          Chinese woodblock printing, known as `mùkè bǎnhuà` (木刻版画), is a traditional technique for printing text and images. The process involves carving a design into a wooden block, applying ink to the block, and pressing it onto paper or fabric. Woodblock printing was used to produce books, religious texts, and artworks, playing a significant role in the dissemination of knowledge and culture. The art form is admired for its detailed and expressive prints, showcasing the skill and creativity of Chinese artisans.                        61. Chinese Opera Masks (戏曲脸谱, Xìqǔ Liǎnpǔ)          Origin: Yuan Dynasty          Ethnicity: Han          Chinese opera masks, known as `xìqǔ liǎnpǔ` (戏曲脸谱), are colorful and symbolic masks used in traditional Chinese opera performances. The masks are painted with intricate patterns and vibrant colors, each representing a specific character and their traits. Red symbolizes loyalty, black indicates integrity, and white suggests treachery. The art of creating and using opera masks is an important aspect of Chinese theatrical tradition, enhancing the visual and dramatic impact of performances.                        62. Naxi Baisha Embroidery (白沙刺绣, Báishā Cìxiù)          Origin: Yuan Dynasty          Ethnicity: Naxi          Naxi Baisha embroidery, known as `báishā cìxiù` (白沙刺绣), is a traditional textile art of the Naxi ethnic group in Yunnan Province. It involves creating detailed and colorful embroidery on cloth, often depicting flowers, animals, and scenes from Naxi mythology. The embroidery is used to decorate clothing, accessories, and household items. Baisha embroidery reflects the rich cultural heritage and artistic traditions of the Naxi people, showcasing their connection to their environment and community.                        63. Chinese Brush Making (毛笔制作, Máobǐ Zhìzuò)          Origin: Han Dynasty          Ethnicity: Han          Chinese brush making, known as `máobǐ zhìzuò` (毛笔制作), is a traditional craft that involves creating brushes for calligraphy and painting. The process includes selecting and preparing animal hair for the brush tip and crafting the handle from bamboo or wood. The quality of the brush is crucial for achieving the desired artistic effects in calligraphy and painting. Brush making requires skill and precision, with artisans carefully assembling and shaping each brush to meet specific artistic needs.                        64. Tibetan Carpet Weaving (藏毯编织, Zàngtǎn Biānzhī)          Origin: 7th Century          Ethnicity: Tibetan          Tibetan carpet weaving, known as `zàngtǎn biānzhī` (藏毯编织), is a traditional craft of the Tibetan people, known for its colorful and durable woolen carpets. The carpets feature intricate patterns and designs inspired by Tibetan culture, nature, and Buddhism. Weaving involves hand-knotting or weaving wool threads onto a loom, creating thick and soft carpets. Tibetan carpets are used for home decor, ceremonial purposes, and as cultural symbols, reflecting the artistic heritage and craftsmanship of the Tibetan people.                        65. Chinese Paper Cut (剪纸, Jiǎnzhǐ)          Origin: Han Dynasty          Ethnicity: Han          Chinese paper cutting, known as `jiǎnzhǐ` (剪纸), is a folk art that involves cutting intricate designs into paper. The art form is often used to create decorations for festivals, weddings, and other celebrations. Common themes include animals, flowers, and traditional symbols. Paper cuts are typically created using red paper, symbolizing good luck and happiness. This craft requires precision and creativity, with each piece being a unique work of art that reflects Chinese cultural values and traditions.                        66. Chinese Seal Paste (印泥, Yìnní)          Origin: Tang Dynasty          Ethnicity: Han          Chinese seal paste, known as `yìnní` (印泥), is a traditional medium used with seals to create imprints. The paste is made from finely ground cinnabar, combined with castor oil and silk strands. The result is a thick, smooth paste that produces a vivid red impression. Seal paste is used in calligraphy, painting, and official documents, adding authenticity and artistic value. The craft of making seal paste requires knowledge of traditional techniques and materials, ensuring the quality and longevity of the paste.                        67. Han Chinese Furniture (汉式家具, Hànshì Jiājù)          Origin: Tang Dynasty          Ethnicity: Han          Han Chinese furniture, known as `hànshì jiājù` (汉式家具), represents the traditional styles and craftsmanship of Chinese furniture-making. It includes items such as chairs, tables, cabinets, and beds, characterized by their elegant designs, quality materials, and intricate carvings. The furniture often features motifs inspired by nature, mythology, and Chinese culture. Han Chinese furniture reflects the aesthetic principles of balance, harmony, and simplicity, combining functionality with artistic beauty.                        68. Chinese Embroidered Shoes (绣花鞋, Xiùhuā Xié)          Origin: Song Dynasty          Ethnicity: Han          Chinese embroidered shoes, known as `xiùhuā xié` (绣花鞋), are traditional footwear decorated with intricate embroidery. The shoes are often made from silk or cotton and feature floral, animal, and symbolic designs. Embroidered shoes were historically worn by women and children, symbolizing beauty, elegance, and cultural identity. The craft involves skilled embroidery techniques, with each pair of shoes being a unique and artistic creation that reflects Chinese fashion and heritage.                        69. Chinese Shadow Puppetry (皮影戏, Píyǐngxì)          Origin: Han Dynasty          Ethnicity: Han          Chinese shadow puppetry, known as `píyǐngxì` (皮影戏), is a traditional form of entertainment that involves manipulating flat puppets made from leather or paper to create shadow images on a screen. The puppets are controlled by rods, and the performances are accompanied by music, narration, and singing. Shadow puppetry tells stories from Chinese     folklore, history, and mythology, combining visual art, storytelling, and performance. This craft requires skill in puppet-making, manipulation, and theatrical presentation, preserving an important aspect of Chinese cultural heritage.                        70. Chinese Dough Figurines (面人, Miànrén)          Origin: Han Dynasty          Ethnicity: Han          Chinese dough figurines, known as `miànrén` (面人), are traditional folk art creations made from colored dough. Artisans shape the dough into various figures, such as animals, characters from folklore, and mythical beings. The process involves mixing flour with water and adding natural pigments to create vibrant colors. Dough figurines are popular at festivals and fairs, delighting audiences with their intricate details and imaginative designs. This craft combines artistic skill with cultural storytelling, preserving a unique aspect of Chinese folk art.                        71. Chinese Porcelain (瓷器, Cíqì)          Origin: Tang Dynasty          Ethnicity: Han          Chinese porcelain, known as `cíqì` (瓷器), is a highly esteemed type of ceramic ware that originated in China. It is made from a fine, white clay called kaolin and fired at high temperatures to achieve a smooth, glass-like finish. Chinese porcelain is known for its beauty, durability, and artistic designs, featuring intricate patterns and glazes. Famous types of Chinese porcelain include blue-and-white ware, celadon, and famille rose. Porcelain has been an important cultural and economic export, symbolizing Chinese craftsmanship and artistic excellence.                        72. Tibetan Metal Craft (藏族金属工艺, Zàngzú Jīnshǔ Gōngyì)          Origin: 7th Century          Ethnicity: Tibetan          Tibetan metal craft, known as `zàngzú jīnshǔ gōngyì` (藏族金属工艺), is a traditional art form that involves creating objects from metals such as gold, silver, and copper. Tibetan metal artisans produce items such as jewelry, religious artifacts, and household utensils, often featuring intricate designs and symbolic motifs. The craft combines techniques like casting, hammering, and engraving, showcasing the skill and creativity of Tibetan metalworkers. Tibetan metal craft reflects the cultural and spiritual heritage of the Tibetan people, with many pieces used in religious and ceremonial contexts.                        73. Chinese Ceramic Sculptures (陶瓷雕塑, Táocí Diāosù)          Origin: Neolithic Era          Ethnicity: Han          Chinese ceramic sculptures, known as `táocí diāosù` (陶瓷雕塑), are traditional art forms that involve sculpting clay into various figures and objects, then firing them at high temperatures to create durable and artistic pieces. These sculptures include figurines, animals, and decorative items, often featuring detailed and expressive designs. Chinese ceramic sculptures have been produced for thousands of years, reflecting the cultural, religious, and artistic achievements of different historical periods and regions in China.                        74. Chinese Lacquerware (漆器, Qīqì)          Origin: Neolithic Era          Ethnicity: Han          Chinese lacquerware, known as `qīqì` (漆器), is a traditional craft that involves coating objects with layers of lacquer to create a smooth, glossy finish. The process includes applying and polishing multiple layers of lacquer, often adding decorative elements such as inlays, carvings, and paintings. Lacquerware is used to make items such as boxes, trays, furniture, and accessories, valued for their beauty and durability. This craft combines artistic skill with technical expertise, showcasing the rich cultural heritage of Chinese lacquer artisans.                        75. Chinese Bamboo Weaving (竹编, Zhúbiān)          Origin: Han Dynasty          Ethnicity: Han          Chinese bamboo weaving, known as `zhúbiān` (竹编), is a traditional craft that involves creating various objects by weaving thin strips of bamboo. The craft includes making items such as baskets, mats, hats, and furniture, often featuring intricate patterns and designs. Bamboo weaving requires skill and precision, with artisans carefully selecting and preparing the bamboo before weaving it into the desired shape. This craft reflects the resourcefulness and creativity of Chinese artisans, utilizing natural materials to create functional and artistic products.                        76. Tibetan Sand Mandala (沙坛城, Shā Tánchéng)          Origin: 8th Century          Ethnicity: Tibetan          The Tibetan sand mandala, known as `shā tánchéng` (沙坛城), is a traditional form of Buddhist art that involves creating intricate designs with colored sand. Monks meticulously place grains of sand to form patterns and symbols representing the universe, deities, and spiritual concepts. The creation of a sand mandala is a meditative and ritualistic process, often taking days or weeks to complete. Once finished, the mandala is ceremonially destroyed to symbolize the impermanence of life. This craft combines artistic skill with spiritual practice, reflecting the deep cultural and religious traditions of Tibetan Buddhism.                        77. Uyghur Dutar Making (都塔尔制作, Dūtǎěr Zhìzuò)          Origin: Tang Dynasty          Ethnicity: Uyghur          Uyghur dutar making, known as `dūtǎěr zhìzuò` (都塔尔制作), is a traditional craft of the Uyghur ethnic group, involving the creation of the dutar, a two-stringed musical instrument. The dutar is made from wood, with a long neck and a pear-shaped body. The strings are traditionally made from gut, although modern versions may use nylon or metal strings. The making of a dutar involves woodworking, carving, and stringing, with artisans often adding decorative elements such as inlays and carvings. The dutar is an important part of Uyghur music and culture, used in folk songs, dances, and celebrations.                        78. Chinese Paper Cutting (剪纸, Jiǎnzhǐ)          Origin: Han Dynasty          Ethnicity: Han          Chinese paper cutting, known as `jiǎnzhǐ` (剪纸), is a traditional folk art that involves cutting intricate designs into paper. The art form is often used to create decorations for festivals, weddings, and other celebrations. Common themes include animals, flowers, and traditional symbols. Paper cuts are typically created using red paper, symbolizing good luck and happiness. This craft requires precision and creativity, with each piece being a unique work of art that reflects Chinese cultural values and traditions.                        79. Dong Drum Tower Architecture (侗族鼓楼建筑, Dòngzú Gǔlóu Jiànzhù)          Origin: Song Dynasty          Ethnicity: Dong          Dong drum tower architecture, known as `dòngzú gǔlóu jiànzhù` (侗族鼓楼建筑), is a traditional architectural style of the Dong ethnic group, characterized by multi-story wooden towers. These drum towers serve as community centers and are often used for meetings, ceremonies, and cultural events. The architecture features intricate woodwork, with interlocking beams and columns that require no nails. The towers are decorated with carvings and paintings, reflecting Dong cultural themes and aesthetics. Dong drum towers are a symbol of community identity and cohesion, showcasing the craftsmanship and architectural knowledge of the Dong people.                        80. Miao Batik (苗族蜡染, Miáozú Làrǎn)          Origin: Ming Dynasty          Ethnicity: Miao          Miao batik, known as `miáozú làrǎn` (苗族蜡染), is a traditional textile art of the Miao ethnic group, involving the use of wax and dye to create     intricate patterns on cloth. The process includes applying wax to the fabric to create resist areas, then dyeing the cloth, and finally removing the wax to reveal the design. Miao batik features motifs inspired by nature, mythology, and daily life, often in bold and contrasting colors. This craft requires skill and creativity, with each piece being a unique expression of Miao cultural heritage and artistic tradition.                        81. Chinese Seal Carving (篆刻, Zhuànkè)          Origin: Zhou Dynasty          Ethnicity: Han          Chinese seal carving, known as `zhuànkè` (篆刻), is a traditional art form that involves carving characters and designs into seals, which are used to make imprints. The seals are typically made from materials such as stone, jade, or ivory, and are used in calligraphy, painting, and official documents. The process requires skill in carving and knowledge of ancient scripts and symbolism. Seal carving is a highly respected craft in Chinese culture, reflecting artistic expression and cultural heritage.                        82. Uyghur Meshrep (麦西热甫, Màixīrèrèfǔ)          Origin: Tang Dynasty          Ethnicity: Uyghur          Uyghur meshrep, known as `màixīrèrèfǔ` (麦西热甫), is a traditional cultural and social gathering of the Uyghur people, involving music, dance, poetry, and storytelling. Meshrep events are held to celebrate important occasions, such as weddings, festivals, and community milestones. The gatherings are characterized by lively performances, communal meals, and social interaction, reflecting the values and traditions of Uyghur culture. Meshrep plays a vital role in preserving and transmitting cultural heritage, fostering community cohesion and cultural identity.                        83. Chinese Kesi Weaving (缂丝, Kèsī)          Origin: Tang Dynasty          Ethnicity: Han          Chinese kesi weaving, known as `kèsī` (缂丝), is a traditional textile art that involves weaving intricate patterns and designs with silk threads. The process includes setting up a loom, creating a design, and meticulously weaving the silk to create detailed and vibrant images. Kesi weaving is known for its fine texture and rich colors, often depicting scenes from nature, mythology, and traditional Chinese culture. This craft requires great skill and patience, with each piece being a masterpiece of textile artistry.                        84. Chinese Rattan Weaving (藤编, Téngbiān)          Origin: Han Dynasty          Ethnicity: Han          Chinese rattan weaving, known as `téngbiān` (藤编), is a traditional craft that involves creating various objects by weaving thin strips of rattan. The craft includes making items such as baskets, furniture, and decorative pieces, often featuring intricate patterns and designs. Rattan weaving requires skill and precision, with artisans carefully selecting and preparing the rattan before weaving it into the desired shape. This craft reflects the resourcefulness and creativity of Chinese artisans, utilizing natural materials to create functional and artistic products.                        85. Tibetan Thangka Painting (唐卡绘画, Tángkǎ Huìhuà)          Origin: 7th Century          Ethnicity: Tibetan          Tibetan thangka painting, known as `tángkǎ huìhuà` (唐卡绘画), is a traditional form of Buddhist art that involves creating intricate and detailed paintings on cloth. Thangka paintings depict religious themes, such as deities, mandalas, and scenes from the life of the Buddha. The process includes preparing the cloth, sketching the design, and meticulously painting with natural pigments. Thangka paintings are used for meditation, teaching, and religious ceremonies, reflecting the spiritual and artistic heritage of Tibetan Buddhism. This craft requires artistic skill and devotion, with each piece being a sacred work of art.                        86. Chinese Tofu Making (豆腐制作, Dòufǔ Zhìzuò)          Origin: Han Dynasty          Ethnicity: Han          Chinese tofu making, known as `dòufǔ zhìzuò` (豆腐制作), is a traditional culinary craft that involves creating tofu from soybeans. The process includes soaking and grinding the soybeans, boiling the mixture, and coagulating the soy milk to form curds, which are then pressed into blocks. Tofu is a versatile and nutritious food, used in a wide variety of dishes in Chinese cuisine. The craft of tofu making reflects the ingenuity and culinary heritage of Chinese food culture, with each region having its own variations and specialties.                        87. Chinese Lantern Making (灯笼制作, Dēnglóng Zhìzuò)          Origin: Han Dynasty          Ethnicity: Han          Chinese lantern making, known as `dēnglóng zhìzuò` (灯笼制作), is a traditional craft that involves creating decorative lanterns from materials such as paper, silk, and bamboo. The process includes designing the lantern, constructing the frame, and adding decorative elements such as painting, calligraphy, and tassels. Lanterns are used for festivals, celebrations, and as decorative lighting, symbolizing light, hope, and happiness. This craft requires creativity and skill, with each lantern being a unique work of art that reflects Chinese cultural values and traditions.                        88. Chinese Sugar Painting (糖画, Tánghuà)          Origin: Ming Dynasty          Ethnicity: Han          Chinese sugar painting, known as `tánghuà` (糖画), is a traditional folk art that involves creating intricate designs with melted sugar. The process includes heating sugar until it melts, then using a ladle or spoon to pour the sugar onto a surface to form patterns and shapes. Common themes include animals, flowers, and traditional symbols. Sugar paintings are popular at festivals and fairs, delighting audiences with their intricate details and sweetness. This craft requires skill and creativity, with each piece being a unique and ephemeral work of art that reflects Chinese folk culture.                        89. Chinese Tea Processing (茶叶加工, Cháyè Jiāgōng)          Origin: Han Dynasty          Ethnicity: Han          Chinese tea processing, known as `cháyè jiāgōng` (茶叶加工), is a traditional craft that involves transforming freshly picked tea leaves into various types of tea. The process includes steps such as withering, rolling, oxidation, and drying, with different methods used to produce green tea, black tea, oolong tea, and other varieties. Tea processing requires knowledge of tea cultivation, processing techniques, and flavor profiles, ensuring the quality and distinctiveness of each type of tea. This craft reflects the rich cultural heritage and tradition of tea in Chinese society.                        90. Chinese Tujia Brocade (土家族织锦, Tǔjiāzú Zhījǐn)          Origin: Han Dynasty          Ethnicity: Tujia          Chinese Tujia brocade, known as `tǔjiāzú zhījǐn` (土家族织锦), is a traditional textile art of the Tujia ethnic group, involving the creation of colorful and intricate woven fabrics. The process includes setting up a loom, designing the pattern, and weaving the threads to create detailed and vibrant textiles. Tujia brocade features motifs inspired by nature, folklore, and daily life, often in bold and contrasting colors. This craft requires skill and creativity, with each piece being a unique expression of Tujia cultural heritage and artistic tradition.                        91. Chinese Dong Embroidery (侗族刺绣, Dòngzú Cìxiù)          Origin: Ming Dynasty          Ethnicity: Dong          Chinese Dong embroidery, known as `dòng    zú cìxiù` (侗族刺绣), is a traditional textile art of the Dong ethnic group, involving the creation of intricate and colorful embroidered designs. The process includes drawing the design on cloth, selecting threads, and stitching the patterns using various embroidery techniques. Dong embroidery features motifs inspired by nature, folklore, and cultural symbols, often in vibrant colors and intricate details. This craft requires skill and creativity, with each piece being a unique expression of Dong cultural heritage and artistic tradition.                        92. Chinese Paper Folding (折纸, Zhēzhǐ)          Origin: Song Dynasty          Ethnicity: Han          Chinese paper folding, known as `zhézhǐ` (折纸), is a traditional folk art that involves folding paper into various shapes and figures. The art form is often used to create decorations, toys, and gifts, with common themes including animals, flowers, and traditional symbols. Paper folding requires skill and creativity, with each piece being a unique work of art that reflects Chinese cultural values and traditions. This craft combines artistic expression with technical skill, preserving an important aspect of Chinese folk culture.                        93. Chinese Cloth Shoes Making (布鞋制作, Bùxié Zhìzuò)          Origin: Han Dynasty          Ethnicity: Han          Chinese cloth shoes making, known as `bùxié zhìzuò` (布鞋制作), is a traditional craft that involves creating shoes from cloth materials. The process includes designing the shoe pattern, cutting the fabric, sewing the pieces together, and adding decorative elements such as embroidery and appliqué. Cloth shoes are valued for their comfort, durability, and cultural significance, often worn during festivals and special occasions. This craft requires skill and creativity, with each pair of shoes being a unique work of art that reflects Chinese cultural heritage and craftsmanship.                        94. Chinese Blue and White Porcelain (青花瓷, Qīnghuācí)          Origin: Yuan Dynasty          Ethnicity: Han          Chinese blue and white porcelain, known as `qīnghuācí` (青花瓷), is a highly esteemed type of ceramic ware that originated in China. It is characterized by its blue designs, often depicting landscapes, flowers, and traditional scenes, on a white background. The process includes forming the porcelain, applying the blue designs using cobalt oxide, and firing the piece at high temperatures. Blue and white porcelain is known for its beauty, durability, and artistic designs, symbolizing Chinese craftsmanship and artistic excellence.                        95. Chinese Shadow Puppetry (皮影戏, Píyǐngxì)          Origin: Han Dynasty          Ethnicity: Han          Chinese shadow puppetry, known as `píyǐngxì` (皮影戏), is a traditional form of theater that involves manipulating flat, articulated puppets made from leather to create shadows on a screen. The puppets are controlled by rods, and their movements are synchronized with music, dialogue, and narration to tell stories. Shadow puppetry often features themes from folklore, history, and mythology, combining visual art, storytelling, and performance. This craft requires skill in puppet-making, manipulation, and theatrical presentation, preserving an important aspect of Chinese cultural heritage.                        96. Chinese Dough Figurines (面人, Miànrén)          Origin: Han Dynasty          Ethnicity: Han          Chinese dough figurines, known as `miànrén` (面人), are traditional folk art creations made from colored dough. Artisans shape the dough into various figures, such as animals, characters from folklore, and mythical beings. The process involves mixing flour with water and adding natural pigments to create vibrant colors. Dough figurines are popular at festivals and fairs, delighting audiences with their intricate details and imaginative designs. This craft combines artistic skill with cultural storytelling, preserving a unique aspect of Chinese folk art.                        97. Chinese Porcelain (瓷器, Cíqì)          Origin: Tang Dynasty          Ethnicity: Han          Chinese porcelain, known as `cíqì` (瓷器), is a highly esteemed type of ceramic ware that originated in China. It is made from a fine, white clay called kaolin and fired at high temperatures to achieve a smooth, glass-like finish. Chinese porcelain is known for its beauty, durability, and artistic designs, featuring intricate patterns and glazes. Famous types of Chinese porcelain include blue-and-white ware, celadon, and famille rose. Porcelain has been an important cultural and economic export, symbolizing Chinese craftsmanship and artistic excellence.                        98. Tibetan Metal Craft (藏族金属工艺, Zàngzú Jīnshǔ Gōngyì)          Origin: 7th Century          Ethnicity: Tibetan          Tibetan metal craft, known as `zàngzú jīnshǔ gōngyì` (藏族金属工艺), is a traditional art form that involves creating objects from metals such as gold, silver, and copper. Tibetan metal artisans produce items such as jewelry, religious artifacts, and household utensils, often featuring intricate designs and symbolic motifs. The craft combines techniques like casting, hammering, and engraving, showcasing the skill and creativity of Tibetan metalworkers. Tibetan metal craft reflects the cultural and spiritual heritage of the Tibetan people, with many pieces used in religious and ceremonial contexts.                        99. Chinese Ceramic Sculptures (陶瓷雕塑, Táocí Diāosù)          Origin: Neolithic Era          Ethnicity: Han          Chinese ceramic sculptures, known as `táocí diāosù` (陶瓷雕塑), are traditional art forms that involve sculpting clay into various figures and objects, then firing them at high temperatures to create durable and artistic pieces. These sculptures include figurines, animals, and decorative items, often featuring detailed and expressive designs. Chinese ceramic sculptures have been produced for thousands of years, reflecting the cultural, religious, and artistic achievements of different historical periods and regions in China.                        100. Chinese Lacquerware (漆器, Qīqì)          Origin: Neolithic Era          Ethnicity: Han          Chinese lacquerware, known as `qīqì` (漆器), is a traditional craft that involves coating objects with layers of lacquer to create a smooth, glossy finish. The process includes applying and polishing multiple layers of lacquer, often adding decorative elements such as inlays, carvings, and paintings. Lacquerware is used to make items such as boxes, trays, furniture, and accessories, valued for their beauty and durability. This craft combines artistic skill with technical expertise, showcasing the rich cultural heritage of Chinese lacquer artisans.                        101. Chinese Bamboo Weaving (竹编, Zhúbiān)          Origin: Han Dynasty          Ethnicity: Han          Chinese bamboo weaving, known as `zhúbiān` (竹编), is a traditional craft that involves creating various objects by weaving thin strips of bamboo. The craft includes making items such as baskets, mats, hats, and furniture, often featuring intricate patterns and designs. Bamboo weaving requires skill and precision, with artisans carefully selecting and preparing the bamboo before weaving it into the desired shape. This craft reflects the resourcefulness and creativity of Chinese artisans, utilizing natural materials to create functional and artistic products.
1. Calligraphy (书法, Shūfǎ) Origin: Shang Dynasty Ethnicity: Han Chinese calligraphy, known as `shūfǎ` (书法) in Chinese, is the art of writing Chinese characters with brush and ink. This ancient craft has a long history in China and is highly regarded as a form of artistic expression. Calligraphy involves mastering various styles, such as seal script, clerical script, regular script, running script, and cursive script. Each style has its own unique characteristics and requires different techniques. Calligraphers practice for years to perfect their brush strokes, achieving balance, rhythm, and harmony in their work. Calligraphy is not only an art form but also a means of communication and a reflection of the writer`s personality and emotions. It is often used to create beautiful works of art that adorn homes, temples, and public spaces, showcasing the cultural heritage and artistic traditions of the Chinese people. 2. Paper Cutting (剪纸, Jiǎnzhǐ) Origin: Han Dynasty Ethnicity: Han Chinese paper cutting, known as `jiǎnzhǐ` (剪纸) in Chinese, is a traditional folk art that involves cutting intricate designs and patterns into paper. This ancient craft has been practiced in China for over a thousand years and is often used for decorative purposes during festivals and celebrations. The designs are typically created using red paper, which symbolizes good luck and happiness. Common motifs include flowers, animals, and scenes from folklore, each with its own symbolic meaning. Paper cutting requires precision and skill, as artisans use sharp scissors or knives to carefully cut the paper into delicate and intricate shapes. The finished pieces are often used to decorate windows, doors, and walls, adding a festive and artistic touch to the surroundings. 3. Porcelain (瓷器, Cíqì) Origin: Tang Dynasty Ethnicity: Han Chinese porcelain, known as `cíqì` (瓷器) in Chinese, is a highly refined and durable type of ceramic that has been produced in China for over a thousand years. The art of making porcelain involves mixing kaolin clay with other minerals, shaping the mixture into desired forms, and firing it at high temperatures to create a hard, translucent material. Porcelain is often decorated with intricate designs and glazes, ranging from simple, elegant patterns to elaborate, colorful scenes. Famous styles of Chinese porcelain include blue and white porcelain, celadon, and famille rose. Chinese porcelain is highly prized for its beauty, craftsmanship, and historical significance, and it has been exported and admired worldwide for centuries. 4. Embroidery (刺绣, Cìxiù) Origin: Han Dynasty Ethnicity: Han, Miao, Zhuang Chinese embroidery, known as `cìxiù` (刺绣) in Chinese, is a traditional textile art that involves stitching decorative patterns onto fabric using silk threads. This ancient craft has a rich history in China and is practiced by various ethnic groups, each with its own unique styles and techniques. Famous regional styles include Suzhou embroidery, known for its delicate and detailed work, and Miao embroidery, characterized by bold colors and geometric patterns. Embroidery is used to create beautiful clothing, accessories, and household items, often featuring intricate designs inspired by nature, mythology, and daily life. The craft requires precision, creativity, and a deep understanding of stitching techniques, reflecting the cultural heritage and artistic skills of the artisans. 5. Chinese Knots (中国结, Zhōngguó Jié) Origin: Tang Dynasty Ethnicity: Han Chinese knotting, known as `zhōngguó jié` (中国结) in Chinese, is a decorative art form that involves tying intricate knots using silk or nylon cords. This ancient craft has a rich history in China and is often used to create decorative ornaments, accessories, and gifts. Chinese knots come in various shapes and designs, each with its own symbolic meaning. Common knot designs include the Pan Chang knot, which represents eternity, and the Double Coin knot, symbolizing wealth and prosperity. The craft requires patience, precision, and a thorough understanding of knotting techniques. Chinese knotting is often passed down through generations as a cultural tradition and is widely practiced during festivals, weddings, and other auspicious occasions. 6. Chinese Opera Masks (戏曲面具, Xìqǔ Miànjù) Origin: Tang Dynasty Ethnicity: Han Chinese opera masks, known as `xìqǔ miànjù` (戏曲面具) in Chinese, are an essential element of traditional Chinese theater. These colorful masks are used to represent different characters and emotions in opera performances, allowing actors to convey their roles more vividly. Each mask design has its own unique characteristics and symbolism. Red masks symbolize loyalty and bravery, black masks represent integrity and righteousness, and white masks signify cunning and treachery. Chinese opera masks are typically made from materials such as paper-mâché, clay, or wood, and are intricately painted with bold, stylized designs. The masks help audiences distinguish between characters and understand their personalities and motivations, adding depth and drama to the performances. 7. Seal Carving (篆刻, Zhuànkè) Origin: Shang Dynasty Ethnicity: Han Seal carving, known as `zhuànkè` (篆刻) in Chinese, is the art of engraving characters onto stone, metal, or wood to create seals, which are used for stamping documents and artwork. Seals are an important part of Chinese culture, often bearing the name of the owner or a meaningful phrase. The practice involves designing the seal, carving the characters in reverse, and polishing the surface for a smooth finish. Seal carving requires precision and skill, as the characters must be carved accurately and artistically. Seals are used by artists to sign their works and by individuals for official and personal purposes, reflecting their identity and status. 8. Bamboo Weaving (竹编, Zhúbiān) Origin: Han Dynasty Ethnicity: Han, Dai Bamboo weaving, known as `zhúbiān` (竹编) in Chinese, is the art of creating functional and decorative items from bamboo strips, including baskets, mats, and furniture. The craft involves splitting bamboo into thin strips, which are then woven together using various techniques to form intricate patterns and shapes. Bamboo weaving is practiced in many regions of China, with each area developing its own unique styles and products. The Dai people, for example, are known for their colorful and durable bamboo baskets. This sustainable craft highlights the versatility of bamboo as a material and the skill of the artisans in transforming it into everyday objects. 9. Shadow Puppetry (皮影戏, Píyǐngxì) Origin: Han Dynasty Ethnicity: Han Shadow puppetry, known as `píyǐngxì` (皮影戏) in Chinese, is a traditional Chinese form of storytelling using flat, articulated figures to create shadows on a screen. Performers manipulate the puppets behind the screen while narrating the story and providing voices for the characters. The puppets are typically made from leather or paper, intricately cut and painted to depict characters from folklore, mythology, and history. Shadow puppetry combines music, singing, and storytelling, creating a unique and immersive cultural experience. This art form has been recognized by UNESCO as an intangible cultural heritage, reflecting its importance in Chinese cultural traditions. 10. Blue and White Porcelain (青花瓷, Qīnghuācí) Origin: Yuan Dynasty Ethnicity: Han Blue and white porcelain, known as `qīnghuācí` (青花瓷) in Chinese, is a type of Chinese ceramic that features blue designs on a white background. This style of porcelain became popular during the Yuan Dynasty and reached its peak during the Ming and Qing Dynasties. The blue designs are created using cobalt oxide, which is applied to the surface of the porcelain before it is glazed and fired at high temperatures. Common motifs include floral patterns, landscapes, and scenes from Chinese folklore. Blue and white porcelain is highly prized for its beauty, craftsmanship, and historical significance, and it remains one of the most recognizable and admired forms of Chinese ceramics worldwide. 11. Silk Weaving (丝织, Sīzhī) Origin: Han Dynasty Ethnicity: Han Silk weaving, known as `sīzhī` (丝织) in Chinese, is the process of creating luxurious textiles from silk threads. This ancient craft has been practiced in China for thousands of years and played a significant role in the country`s history and economy. The process begins with raising silkworms to produce silk cocoons, which are then unwound to obtain silk threads. These threads are dyed and woven into intricate patterns using traditional looms. Silk weaving requires skill and precision, with artisans creating beautiful fabrics that are used for clothing, accessories, and home decor. The Silk Road, an ancient trade route, was named after this valuable textile, highlighting its importance in Chinese culture and global trade. 12. Peking Opera (京剧, Jīngjù) Origin: Qing Dynasty Ethnicity: Han Peking Opera, known as `jīngjù` (京剧) in Chinese, is a traditional form of Chinese theater that combines music, singing, acting, and acrobatics. This art form originated in Beijing during the Qing Dynasty and has since become one of China`s most famous cultural treasures. Peking Opera performances feature elaborate costumes, vibrant makeup, and stylized movements, with actors portraying historical, mythological, and fictional characters. The music is performed using traditional Chinese instruments, such as the jinghu (a two-stringed fiddle) and the pipa (a plucked lute). Peking Opera is known for its distinctive vocal style and complex choreography, requiring years of training for performers to master. It remains a beloved and influential part of Chinese cultural heritage. 13. Woodblock Printing (木版画, Mùbǎnhuà) Origin: Tang Dynasty Ethnicity: Han Woodblock printing, known as `mùbǎnhuà` (木版画) in Chinese, is a traditional Chinese technique for printing text, images, and patterns using carved wooden blocks. This method was widely used for producing books, artworks, and textiles. The process involves carving the desired design into a wooden block, applying ink to the surface, and pressing it onto paper or fabric. Woodblock printing played a crucial role in the dissemination of knowledge and culture in ancient China. The prints often feature intricate details and vibrant colors, showcasing the skill and artistry of the craftsmen. This technique laid the foundation for modern printing methods and remains an important part of China`s cultural heritage. 14. Paper Lanterns (纸灯笼, Zhǐdēnglóng) Origin: Eastern Han Dynasty Ethnicity: Han Paper lanterns are traditional Chinese decorative items made from paper or silk, often used during festivals and celebrations. They come in various shapes and sizes, with designs ranging from simple to elaborate. The lanterns are typically illuminated by candles, oil lamps, or electric lights, creating a warm and festive atmosphere. Paper lanterns are especially popular during the Lantern Festival, which marks the end of the Chinese New Year celebrations. The craft involves constructing the lantern frame, covering it with paper or silk, and decorating it with paintings, calligraphy, or cut-outs. Paper lanterns symbolize good fortune, happiness, and the reunion of family. 15. Silver Ornaments (银饰, Yínshì) Origin: Ming Dynasty Ethnicity: Miao, Dong, Yao Silver ornaments, known as `yínshì` (银饰) in Chinese, are traditional jewelry pieces crafted by ethnic minorities in China, such as the Miao, Dong, and Yao people. These ornaments include earrings, necklaces, bracelets, and headdresses, often featuring intricate designs and symbols. The craft involves techniques such as casting, hammering, engraving, and filigree to create detailed and delicate patterns. Silver ornaments are worn during festivals, weddings, and other important events, symbolizing beauty, wealth, and social status. They are also believed to have protective and auspicious properties. The craftsmanship of silver ornaments showcases the cultural heritage and artistic skills of these ethnic groups. 16. Tibetan Thangka Painting (唐卡, Tángkǎ) Origin: 7th Century Ethnicity: Tibetan Thangka painting, known as `tángkǎ` (唐卡) in Chinese, is a traditional Tibetan art form that involves creating religious paintings on cloth, depicting Buddhist deities, mandalas, and scenes from scriptures. Thangkas are used for meditation, teaching, and as objects of veneration in monasteries and homes. The creation of a thangka involves meticulous drawing, painting, and sometimes embroidery, using natural pigments and gold. The process is highly ritualistic and requires a deep understanding of Buddhist iconography and symbolism. Thangka paintings are known for their vibrant colors, intricate details, and spiritual significance, reflecting the rich cultural and religious heritage of the Tibetan people. 17. Dragon Dance (舞龙, Wǔlóng) Origin: Han Dynasty Ethnicity: Han The dragon dance, known as `wǔlóng` (舞龙) in Chinese, is a traditional Chinese performance that involves a team of dancers manipulating a large, flexible dragon puppet. The dance is typically performed during festivals such as Chinese New Year and the Lantern Festival to bring good luck and prosperity. The dragon, made of fabric and bamboo, can be over 30 meters long, with dancers using poles to animate its movements. The performance is accompanied by drums, gongs, and cymbals, creating a lively and festive atmosphere. The dragon dance symbolizes power, strength, and good fortune, reflecting the cultural importance of dragons in Chinese mythology. 18. Paper Fans (纸扇, Zhǐshàn) Origin: Han Dynasty Ethnicity: Han Paper fans, known as `zhǐshàn` (纸扇) in Chinese, are traditional Chinese accessories made from paper or silk, mounted on bamboo or wooden frames. They are used for cooling, as well as for decorative and ceremonial purposes. Paper fans come in various shapes and sizes, with designs that often feature paintings, calligraphy, and poems. The craft involves constructing the fan frame, attaching the paper or silk, and decorating it with artistic elements. Paper fans are popular during festivals and as gifts, symbolizing elegance and cultural refinement. They are also used in traditional dance performances, adding grace and fluidity to the movements. 19. Yangko Dance (秧歌, Yānggē) Origin: Song Dynasty Ethnicity: Han Yangko dance, known as `yānggē` (秧歌) in Chinese, is a traditional Chinese folk dance performed during festivals and celebrations, especially during the Lunar New Year. The dance is characterized by its lively and rhythmic movements, with dancers often carrying colorful fans or handkerchiefs. Yangko dance performances are typically accompanied by traditional music played on instruments such as drums, gongs, and flutes. The dance movements mimic agricultural activities and are meant to bring good harvests and prosperity. Yangko dance reflects the joyous spirit of the people and their connection to the land, showcasing the vibrancy and diversity of Chinese folk culture. 20. Chinese New Year Woodblock Prints (年画, Niánhuà) Origin: Song Dynasty Ethnicity : Han Chinese New Year woodblock prints, known as `niánhuà` (年画) in Chinese, are traditional folk art pieces created to celebrate the Lunar New Year. These prints depict auspicious symbols, deities, and scenes of prosperity and happiness, and are used to decorate homes and temples. The process involves carving the design into a wooden block, applying ink or paint, and pressing it onto paper. The prints are often brightly colored and feature intricate details. Niánhuà prints are believed to bring good luck and ward off evil spirits, reflecting the cultural significance and festive spirit of the Chinese New Year celebrations. 21. Kites (风筝, Fēngzhēng) Origin: Han Dynasty Ethnicity: Han Kites, known as `fēngzhēng` (风筝) in Chinese, are traditional Chinese flying objects made from bamboo frames covered with paper or silk. Kites are used for recreational purposes, as well as for cultural and religious events. The craft of kite-making involves designing the frame, attaching the covering, and painting the kite with colorful patterns and motifs. Common designs include dragons, birds, and flowers. Kite flying is a popular activity during the Qingming Festival and other festivals, symbolizing the release of worries and the connection between the earthly and the divine. Chinese kites are admired for their beauty, craftsmanship, and cultural significance. 22. Chinese Puppetry (木偶戏, Mù`ǒuxì) Origin: Han Dynasty Ethnicity: Han Chinese puppetry, known as `mù`ǒuxì` (木偶戏) in Chinese, is a traditional form of theater that uses puppets to tell stories and entertain audiences. Puppetry has a long history in China, with various regional styles and techniques. The puppets are typically made from wood, clay, or cloth, and are intricately crafted and painted. Performers manipulate the puppets using strings, rods, or their hands, bringing them to life with expressive movements and voices. Chinese puppetry often features stories from folklore, mythology, and history, combining music, singing, and dialogue to create engaging performances. This art form reflects the creativity and cultural heritage of the Chinese people. 23. Cloisonné (景泰蓝, Jǐngtàilán) Origin: Yuan Dynasty Ethnicity: Han Cloisonné, known as `jǐngtàilán` (景泰蓝) in Chinese, is a traditional Chinese art form that involves decorating metal objects with enamel. The process begins by creating a design with thin metal wires, which are soldered onto a metal surface to form compartments (cloisons). These compartments are then filled with enamel paste and fired in a kiln. The enamel hardens into a glossy, colorful finish, and the piece is polished to reveal the intricate design. Cloisonné is used to create a variety of decorative items, including vases, bowls, and jewelry. This craft is admired for its beauty, complexity, and historical significance, reflecting the artistic achievements of Chinese artisans. 24. Dough Sculpture (面塑, Miànsù) Origin: Tang Dynasty Ethnicity: Han Dough sculpture, known as `miànsù` (面塑) in Chinese, is a traditional folk art that involves shaping and molding colored dough into various shapes and figures. This art form originated in China during the Tang Dynasty and has since evolved into a popular form of decorative and ceremonial art. Dough sculptures are typically made from wheat or rice flour dough mixed with water and pigments to create vibrant colors. Artisans use their hands and simple tools to shape the dough into intricate designs, often depicting animals, mythological creatures, and scenes from daily life. Once the sculptures are completed, they are dried or baked to preserve them. Dough sculpture is often used to decorate temples, homes, and festive celebrations, adding a touch of color and whimsy to the surroundings. 25. Miao Embroidery (苗绣, Miáoxiù) Origin: Ming Dynasty Ethnicity: Miao Miao embroidery, known as `miáoxiù` (苗绣) in Chinese, is a traditional textile art practiced by the Miao ethnic group. This craft involves stitching intricate patterns onto fabric using brightly colored threads. The designs often feature motifs inspired by nature, mythology, and daily life, reflecting the cultural heritage and artistic traditions of the Miao people. Miao embroidery is used to create clothing, accessories, and household items, often incorporating techniques such as cross-stitch, applique, and batik. The embroidery is highly detailed and vibrant, showcasing the skill and creativity of the artisans. Miao embroidery is an important cultural tradition, passed down through generations and celebrated for its beauty and craftsmanship. 26. Chinese Brush Painting (国画, Guóhuà) Origin: Han Dynasty Ethnicity: Han Chinese brush painting, known as `guóhuà` (国画) in Chinese, is a traditional art form that uses brushes, ink, and pigments to create images on paper or silk. This painting style emphasizes the use of line, brushwork, and composition to convey the essence of the subject, rather than realistic details. Common themes include landscapes, flowers, birds, and figures, often accompanied by calligraphy and seals. Chinese brush painting requires mastery of various techniques, such as brush pressure, ink control, and composition. The art form reflects the philosophical and aesthetic principles of Chinese culture, emphasizing harmony, balance, and the beauty of nature. 27. Chinese Seal (印章, Yìnzhāng) Origin: Shang Dynasty Ethnicity: Han The Chinese seal, known as `yìnzhāng` (印章) in Chinese, is a traditional tool used for stamping documents, artwork, and personal items. Seals are typically made from materials such as stone, metal, or wood, and are carved with characters or symbols representing the owner`s name, title, or an auspicious phrase. The art of seal carving involves designing the seal, carving the characters in reverse, and polishing the surface for a smooth finish. Seals are an important part of Chinese culture, used by artists to sign their works and by individuals for official and personal purposes. The craft of seal carving requires precision and skill, reflecting the cultural and artistic heritage of China. 28. Chinese Tie-Dyeing (扎染, Zhārǎn) Origin: Han Dynasty Ethnicity: Bai, Yi Chinese tie-dyeing, known as `zhārǎn` (扎染) in Chinese, is an ancient textile dyeing technique that involves tying or binding sections of fabric before dyeing to create patterns and designs. This art form has a long history in China and is practiced by various ethnic groups, including the Bai and Yi people. The process begins with preparing the fabric, which is typically made from natural materials such as cotton or silk. Artisans then use different tying and binding techniques to create intricate patterns, often inspired by nature, mythology, and traditional symbols. After tying, the fabric is submerged in dye baths, with each color applied in sequence. Once dyed, the fabric is washed and the ties are removed, revealing the intricate designs. Chinese tie-dyeing produces vibrant and unique textiles that are used for clothing, accessories, and decorative items, reflecting the rich cultural heritage and artistic creativity of the Chinese people. 29. Chinese Folk Painting (民间绘画, Mínjiān Huìhuà) Origin: Han Dynasty Ethnicity: Han Chinese folk painting, known as `mínjiān huìhuà` (民间绘画) in Chinese, is a traditional art form that reflects the daily life, customs, and beliefs of the people. Folk paintings often feature vibrant colors and simple, expressive lines, depicting scenes from nature, mythology, and local festivals. The art form is practiced across various regions of China, with each area developing its own unique styles and themes. Folk paintings are commonly used to decorate homes, temples , and public spaces, adding a touch of beauty and cultural significance to the surroundings. This art form embodies the creativity and spirit of the people, showcasing their connection to their heritage and community. 30. Chinese Paper-Cutting (剪纸, Jiǎnzhǐ) Origin: Han Dynasty Ethnicity: Han Chinese paper-cutting, known as `jiǎnzhǐ` (剪纸) in Chinese, is a traditional folk art that involves cutting intricate designs into paper using scissors or knives. This craft has been practiced in China for over 1,500 years and is often associated with festivals, celebrations, and cultural rituals. Paper-cut designs range from simple to elaborate, featuring motifs such as animals, flowers, and auspicious symbols. The process involves folding the paper and cutting along specific lines to create symmetrical patterns. Paper-cuts are used to decorate windows, doors, and walls, adding a festive and artistic touch to homes and public spaces. This art form reflects the skill and creativity of the artisans, as well as the cultural values and traditions of Chinese society. 31. Tibetan Carpet Weaving (藏毯, Zàngtǎn) Origin: 7th Century Ethnicity: Tibetan Tibetan carpet weaving, known as `zàngtǎn` (藏毯) in Chinese, is a traditional craft practiced by Tibetan people. This art form involves weaving carpets from wool, often featuring intricate patterns and vibrant colors inspired by nature, religion, and daily life. The weaving process begins with spinning and dyeing the wool, followed by setting up the loom and weaving the carpet by hand. Tibetan carpets are known for their durability, softness, and unique designs, reflecting the cultural and artistic heritage of the Tibetan people. These carpets are used for practical purposes, such as floor coverings and wall hangings, as well as for ceremonial and decorative purposes. 32. Chinese Opera Masks (戏曲面具, Xìqǔ Miànjù) Origin: Song Dynasty Ethnicity: Han Chinese opera masks, known as `xìqǔ miànjù` (戏曲面具) in Chinese, are traditional masks used in various forms of Chinese opera. These masks are painted with vivid colors and patterns, representing different characters, emotions, and traits. The art of mask-making involves sculpting the mask from materials such as wood, paper-mache, or metal, and then painting it with intricate designs. Each color and pattern has specific meanings, with red symbolizing loyalty, black representing integrity, and white indicating treachery. Chinese opera masks are an essential part of the performance, enhancing the visual and emotional impact of the characters and stories. This craft reflects the rich cultural and artistic traditions of Chinese theater. 33. Yao Embroidery (瑶绣, Yáoxiù) Origin: Tang Dynasty Ethnicity: Yao Yao embroidery, known as `yáoxiù` (瑶绣) in Chinese, is a traditional textile art practiced by the Yao ethnic group. This craft involves stitching intricate patterns onto fabric using brightly colored threads. The designs often feature motifs inspired by nature, mythology, and daily life, reflecting the cultural heritage and artistic traditions of the Yao people. Yao embroidery is used to create clothing, accessories, and household items, often incorporating techniques such as cross-stitch, applique, and batik. The embroidery is highly detailed and vibrant, showcasing the skill and creativity of the artisans. Yao embroidery is an important cultural tradition, passed down through generations and celebrated for its beauty and craftsmanship. 34. Nuo Opera (傩戏, Nuóxì) Origin: Shang Dynasty Ethnicity: Han Nuo opera, known as `nuóxì` (傩戏) in Chinese, is a traditional form of Chinese theater that combines drama, music, dance, and acrobatics. This ancient art form originated during the Shang Dynasty and is closely associated with ritual and religious ceremonies. Nuo opera performances feature elaborate costumes, masks, and props, with actors portraying gods, spirits, and mythological figures. The stories often involve themes of good versus evil, exorcism, and blessings. Nuo opera is known for its dynamic and expressive style, requiring performers to master a range of skills. This art form reflects the deep cultural and spiritual heritage of the Chinese people, serving as a bridge between the human and the divine. 35. Chinese Shadow Puppetry (皮影戏, Píyǐngxì) Origin: Han Dynasty Ethnicity: Han Chinese shadow puppetry, known as `píyǐngxì` (皮影戏) in Chinese, is a traditional form of storytelling that uses flat, articulated figures made from leather or paper to create shadows on a screen. This art form has been practiced in China for over a thousand years and is known for its intricate craftsmanship and expressive performances. The puppets are manipulated by skilled puppeteers using rods or strings, bringing the characters to life with movement and dialogue. Shadow puppetry performances often depict stories from folklore, mythology, and history, accompanied by music and singing. This craft reflects the creativity and cultural heritage of the Chinese people, providing a unique and captivating form of entertainment. 36. Suzhou Embroidery (苏绣, Sūxiù) Origin: Han Dynasty Ethnicity: Han Suzhou embroidery, known as `sūxiù` (苏绣), is one of the most renowned embroidery styles in China. Originating in Suzhou, it is celebrated for its delicate and refined technique, using fine silk threads to create lifelike images. The art requires immense skill and patience, with artisans often spending months to complete a single piece. Suzhou embroidery often features landscapes, flowers, and birds, showcasing the natural beauty and artistic talent of the region. 37. Qiang Embroidery (羌绣, Qiāngxiù) Origin: Qing Dynasty Ethnicity: Qiang Qiang embroidery, known as `qiāngxiù` (羌绣), is a traditional craft of the Qiang ethnic group. It is known for its bold colors and intricate patterns, often depicting geometric shapes, flowers, and animals. The embroidery is used to decorate clothing, accessories, and household items. Qiang embroidery reflects the rich cultural heritage and artistic expression of the Qiang people, with each piece telling a unique story. 38. Shu Embroidery (蜀绣, Shǔxiù) Origin: Han Dynasty Ethnicity: Han Shu embroidery, known as `shǔxiù` (蜀绣), originates from Sichuan Province and is famous for its smooth and elegant style. It uses fine silk threads and a variety of stitching techniques to create detailed and vibrant images. Common themes include flowers, birds, and traditional Chinese symbols. Shu embroidery is highly valued for its artistic beauty and technical excellence, often used to create decorative items and gifts. 39. Chinese Knotting (中国结, Zhōngguó Jié) Origin: Tang Dynasty Ethnicity: Han Chinese knotting, known as `zhōngguó jié` (中国结), is a traditional craft that involves creating decorative knots using a single piece of cord. Each knot has its own symbolic meaning, often representing good luck, prosperity, and longevity. The knots are used to create jewelry, ornaments, and home decorations. This craft requires precision and skill, with artisans using various techniques to create intricate and beautiful designs. 40. Dong Embroidery (侗绣, Dòngxiù) Origin: Ming Dynasty Ethnicity: Dong Dong embroidery, known as `dòngxiù` (侗绣), is a traditional textile art of the Dong ethnic group. It is known for its vibrant colors and detailed patterns, often depicting scenes from nature, daily life, and Dong folklore. The embroidery is used to decorate clothing, accessories, and household items. Dong embroidery reflects the rich cultural heritage and artistic traditions of the Dong people, showcasing their connection to their environment and community. 41. Blue Calico Printing (蓝印花布, Lán Yìn Huā Bù) Origin: Song Dynasty Ethnicity: Han Blue calico printing, known as `lán yìn huā bù` (蓝印花布), is a traditional Chinese textile art that involves printing patterns onto cotton fabric using indigo dye. The process involves creating a stencil, applying a resist paste, and dyeing the fabric. The result is a beautiful blue and white design, often featuring floral and geometric patterns. Blue calico is used for clothing, home decor, and ceremonial items, reflecting the cultural heritage and artistic creativity of Chinese artisans. 42. Paper Fan Making (扇子制作, Shànzi Zhìzuò) Origin: Han Dynasty Ethnicity: Han Paper fan making, known as `shànzi zhìzuò` (扇子制作), is a traditional Chinese craft that involves creating beautiful and functional fans from paper and bamboo. The fans are often painted with calligraphy, landscapes, and floral designs. This craft requires precision and artistry, with each fan being a unique piece of art. Paper fans are used for cooling, decoration, and as cultural symbols in Chinese society. 43. Chinese Lantern Making (灯笼制作, Dēnglóng Zhìzuò) Origin: Han Dynasty Ethnicity: Han Chinese lantern making, known as `dēnglóng zhìzuò` (灯笼制作), is a traditional craft that involves creating decorative lanterns from paper, silk, and bamboo. The lanterns are often brightly colored and feature intricate designs, symbolizing prosperity, good luck, and celebration. Lanterns are commonly used during festivals, such as the Lantern Festival and Chinese New Year, to add a festive and joyful atmosphere. 44. Tujia Brocade (土家织锦, Tǔjiā Zhījǐn) Origin: Ming Dynasty Ethnicity: Tujia Tujia brocade, known as `tǔjiā zhījǐn` (土家织锦), is a traditional textile art of the Tujia ethnic group. It involves weaving colorful patterns and designs into fabric using silk and cotton threads. The brocade is known for its durability, bright colors, and intricate patterns, often depicting flowers, animals, and geometric shapes. Tujia brocade is used to create clothing, accessories, and home decor items, reflecting the cultural heritage and artistic traditions of the Tujia people. 45. Chinese Porcelain (瓷器, Cíqì) Origin: Tang Dynasty Ethnicity: Han Chinese porcelain, known as `cíqì` (瓷器), is one of China`s most famous and influential art forms. Porcelain involves shaping and firing clay at high temperatures to create durable and beautiful ceramic wares. The art of porcelain-making reached its peak during the Tang and Song Dynasties, with famous kilns such as Jingdezhen producing exquisite pieces. Chinese porcelain is admired for its delicate beauty, intricate designs, and technical excellence, often featuring blue-and-white patterns, floral motifs, and scenes from nature and mythology. 46. Hanfu Making (汉服制作, Hànfú Zhìzuò) Origin: Han Dynasty Ethnicity: Han Hanfu making, known as `hànfú zhìzuò` (汉服制作), is the traditional craft of creating Han Chinese clothing. Hanfu refers to the historical clothing worn by the Han people, characterized by flowing robes, wide sleeves, and intricate patterns. The craft involves designing, cutting, and sewing fabric to create garments that reflect the elegance and cultural heritage of ancient China. Hanfu is experiencing a revival in modern times, with enthusiasts wearing it for cultural events, festivals, and daily life, celebrating Chinese history and identity. 47. Yixing Clay Teapots (宜兴紫砂壶, Y íxìng Zǐshā Hú) Origin: Ming Dynasty Ethnicity: Han Yixing clay teapots, known as `yíxìng zǐshā hú` (宜兴紫砂壶), are traditional Chinese teapots made from purple clay found in Yixing, Jiangsu Province. These teapots are prized for their unique ability to enhance the flavor of tea. The craft involves shaping the clay by hand or using molds, followed by firing at high temperatures. Yixing teapots are known for their unglazed surfaces, which allow the clay to absorb and release the aroma of the tea. They are highly collectible and valued for their beauty, functionality, and cultural significance. 48. Chinese Ruyi Scepter (如意, Rúyì) Origin: Han Dynasty Ethnicity: Han The Chinese ruyi scepter, known as `rúyì` (如意), is a traditional symbol of power and good fortune. The scepter is often carved from materials such as jade, wood, or ivory, and features a curved shape with a cloud-like head. Ruyi scepters were used by scholars, officials, and emperors as a status symbol and a token of blessings. The name `ruyi` means `as you wish,` reflecting its auspicious connotations. This craft combines artistry with cultural symbolism, representing authority, prosperity, and harmony. 49. Chinese Calligraphy (书法, Shūfǎ) Origin: Shang Dynasty Ethnicity: Han Chinese calligraphy, known as `shūfǎ` (书法), is the artistic practice of writing Chinese characters with brush and ink. It is considered one of the highest forms of Chinese art, requiring skill, concentration, and creativity. Calligraphy involves writing characters in various styles, such as seal script, clerical script, cursive script, and regular script. Each style has its own rules and aesthetics. Calligraphy is not only a means of communication but also an expression of the writer`s personality, emotions, and cultural identity. It is often displayed on scrolls, fans, and other mediums, admired for its beauty and artistic value. 50. Chinese Seal Engraving (篆刻, Zhuànkè) Origin: Zhou Dynasty Ethnicity: Han Chinese seal engraving, known as `zhuànkè` (篆刻), is a traditional art form that involves carving characters into seals made of materials such as stone, ivory, or jade. Seals are used to imprint an individual`s name or a decorative design on documents, artwork, and other items. The art of seal engraving requires precision and skill, with the engraver using specialized tools to create detailed and intricate designs. Seals are an important aspect of Chinese culture, symbolizing authority, authenticity, and personal identity. 51. Traditional Chinese Medicine (中医, Zhōngyī) Origin: Han Dynasty Ethnicity: Han Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM), known as `zhōngyī` (中医), is a holistic system of healthcare that has been practiced in China for thousands of years. TCM includes various therapies such as herbal medicine, acupuncture, cupping, and qigong. The principles of TCM are based on balancing the body`s energy, known as `qi,` and maintaining harmony between the body`s internal organs and the external environment. TCM is deeply rooted in Chinese philosophy and culture, emphasizing the interconnectedness of the body, mind, and spirit. 52. Chinese Pottery (陶器, Táoqì) Origin: Neolithic Era Ethnicity: Han Chinese pottery, known as `táoqì` (陶器), has a long and rich history, dating back to the Neolithic era. Pottery involves shaping and firing clay to create various vessels and objects, such as jars, bowls, and figurines. Chinese pottery is known for its diversity of styles, techniques, and glazes, with famous types including Tang sancai (three-colored) pottery and Cizhou ware. Pottery reflects the cultural and artistic achievements of different historical periods and regions in China, serving both practical and decorative purposes. 53. Naxi Dongba Painting (纳西东巴画, Nàxī Dōngbā Huà) Origin: Yuan Dynasty Ethnicity: Naxi Naxi Dongba painting, known as `nàxī dōngbā huà` (纳西东巴画), is a traditional art form of the Naxi ethnic group in Yunnan Province. It involves creating religious and ceremonial paintings on paper or cloth, using natural pigments and simple brushes. Dongba paintings often depict deities, rituals, and symbols from Naxi mythology and culture. This art form is closely associated with the Dongba religion and its priests, who use the paintings in ceremonies and as teaching tools. Dongba painting reflects the spiritual and cultural heritage of the Naxi people, preserving their traditions and beliefs. 54. Chinese Sugar Painting (糖画, Táng Huà) Origin: Ming Dynasty Ethnicity: Han Chinese sugar painting, known as `táng huà` (糖画), is a traditional folk art that involves creating intricate designs and figures using melted sugar. The artist uses a small ladle to pour and manipulate the sugar on a marble or metal surface, forming shapes such as animals, flowers, and symbols. Once the sugar cools and hardens, the delicate and edible artworks are ready to be enjoyed. Sugar painting is a popular attraction at Chinese festivals and fairs, delighting both children and adults with its sweet and artistic creations. 55. Chinese Cloisonné (景泰蓝, Jǐngtàilán) Origin: Ming Dynasty Ethnicity: Han Chinese cloisonné, known as `jǐngtàilán` (景泰蓝), is a traditional enamelware craft that involves decorating metal objects with colorful enamel. The process includes creating a design with thin metal wires, filling the spaces with enamel paste, and firing the object to fuse the enamel to the metal. The result is a beautiful and durable piece with intricate patterns and vibrant colors. Cloisonné is used to create vases, bowls, jewelry, and decorative items, showcasing the artistry and technical skill of Chinese artisans. 56. Miao Silverwork (苗银, Miáoyín) Origin: Ming Dynasty Ethnicity: Miao Miao silverwork, known as `miáoyín` (苗银), is a traditional craft of the Miao ethnic group, renowned for its intricate and beautiful silver jewelry. Miao silverwork includes necklaces, bracelets, earrings, and headdresses, often featuring detailed patterns and motifs inspired by nature and Miao mythology. The craft involves techniques such as hammering, engraving, and filigree work. Miao silver jewelry is not only a symbol of beauty and status but also an important aspect of cultural identity and heritage. 57. Tibetan Thangka Painting (唐卡, Tángkǎ) Origin: 7th Century Ethnicity: Tibetan Tibetan Thangka painting, known as `tángkǎ` (唐卡), is a traditional form of Buddhist art that involves creating religious paintings on cloth or paper. Thangkas often depict deities, mandalas, and scenes from Buddhist mythology. The paintings are created using natural pigments and detailed brushwork, with the process requiring precision and devotion. Thangkas are used in religious ceremonies, meditation, and as teaching tools, reflecting the spiritual and artistic traditions of Tibetan Buddhism. 58. Chinese Gourd Painting ( 葫芦画, Húlú Huà) Origin: Qing Dynasty Ethnicity: Han Chinese gourd painting, known as `húlú huà` (葫芦画), is a folk art that involves decorating gourds with intricate designs and patterns. The process includes cleaning and drying the gourds, then using techniques such as painting, carving, and pyrography to create the artwork. Gourd paintings often feature themes from nature, folklore, and Chinese mythology. The decorated gourds are used as ornaments, containers, and symbolic gifts, representing good fortune and prosperity. 59. Chinese Jade Carving (玉雕, Yùdiāo) Origin: Neolithic Era Ethnicity: Han Chinese jade carving, known as `yùdiāo` (玉雕), is an ancient and highly esteemed art form that involves sculpting jade into various objects and ornaments. Jade is prized for its beauty, durability, and symbolic significance, often associated with purity, longevity, and status. The carving process requires great skill and precision, with artisans creating intricate designs and detailed figures. Jade carvings include jewelry, figurines, seals, and ceremonial items, reflecting the cultural and artistic heritage of China. 60. Chinese Woodblock Printing (木刻版画, Mùkè Bǎnhuà) Origin: Tang Dynasty Ethnicity: Han Chinese woodblock printing, known as `mùkè bǎnhuà` (木刻版画), is a traditional technique for printing text and images. The process involves carving a design into a wooden block, applying ink to the block, and pressing it onto paper or fabric. Woodblock printing was used to produce books, religious texts, and artworks, playing a significant role in the dissemination of knowledge and culture. The art form is admired for its detailed and expressive prints, showcasing the skill and creativity of Chinese artisans. 61. Chinese Opera Masks (戏曲脸谱, Xìqǔ Liǎnpǔ) Origin: Yuan Dynasty Ethnicity: Han Chinese opera masks, known as `xìqǔ liǎnpǔ` (戏曲脸谱), are colorful and symbolic masks used in traditional Chinese opera performances. The masks are painted with intricate patterns and vibrant colors, each representing a specific character and their traits. Red symbolizes loyalty, black indicates integrity, and white suggests treachery. The art of creating and using opera masks is an important aspect of Chinese theatrical tradition, enhancing the visual and dramatic impact of performances. 62. Naxi Baisha Embroidery (白沙刺绣, Báishā Cìxiù) Origin: Yuan Dynasty Ethnicity: Naxi Naxi Baisha embroidery, known as `báishā cìxiù` (白沙刺绣), is a traditional textile art of the Naxi ethnic group in Yunnan Province. It involves creating detailed and colorful embroidery on cloth, often depicting flowers, animals, and scenes from Naxi mythology. The embroidery is used to decorate clothing, accessories, and household items. Baisha embroidery reflects the rich cultural heritage and artistic traditions of the Naxi people, showcasing their connection to their environment and community. 63. Chinese Brush Making (毛笔制作, Máobǐ Zhìzuò) Origin: Han Dynasty Ethnicity: Han Chinese brush making, known as `máobǐ zhìzuò` (毛笔制作), is a traditional craft that involves creating brushes for calligraphy and painting. The process includes selecting and preparing animal hair for the brush tip and crafting the handle from bamboo or wood. The quality of the brush is crucial for achieving the desired artistic effects in calligraphy and painting. Brush making requires skill and precision, with artisans carefully assembling and shaping each brush to meet specific artistic needs. 64. Tibetan Carpet Weaving (藏毯编织, Zàngtǎn Biānzhī) Origin: 7th Century Ethnicity: Tibetan Tibetan carpet weaving, known as `zàngtǎn biānzhī` (藏毯编织), is a traditional craft of the Tibetan people, known for its colorful and durable woolen carpets. The carpets feature intricate patterns and designs inspired by Tibetan culture, nature, and Buddhism. Weaving involves hand-knotting or weaving wool threads onto a loom, creating thick and soft carpets. Tibetan carpets are used for home decor, ceremonial purposes, and as cultural symbols, reflecting the artistic heritage and craftsmanship of the Tibetan people. 65. Chinese Paper Cut (剪纸, Jiǎnzhǐ) Origin: Han Dynasty Ethnicity: Han Chinese paper cutting, known as `jiǎnzhǐ` (剪纸), is a folk art that involves cutting intricate designs into paper. The art form is often used to create decorations for festivals, weddings, and other celebrations. Common themes include animals, flowers, and traditional symbols. Paper cuts are typically created using red paper, symbolizing good luck and happiness. This craft requires precision and creativity, with each piece being a unique work of art that reflects Chinese cultural values and traditions. 66. Chinese Seal Paste (印泥, Yìnní) Origin: Tang Dynasty Ethnicity: Han Chinese seal paste, known as `yìnní` (印泥), is a traditional medium used with seals to create imprints. The paste is made from finely ground cinnabar, combined with castor oil and silk strands. The result is a thick, smooth paste that produces a vivid red impression. Seal paste is used in calligraphy, painting, and official documents, adding authenticity and artistic value. The craft of making seal paste requires knowledge of traditional techniques and materials, ensuring the quality and longevity of the paste. 67. Han Chinese Furniture (汉式家具, Hànshì Jiājù) Origin: Tang Dynasty Ethnicity: Han Han Chinese furniture, known as `hànshì jiājù` (汉式家具), represents the traditional styles and craftsmanship of Chinese furniture-making. It includes items such as chairs, tables, cabinets, and beds, characterized by their elegant designs, quality materials, and intricate carvings. The furniture often features motifs inspired by nature, mythology, and Chinese culture. Han Chinese furniture reflects the aesthetic principles of balance, harmony, and simplicity, combining functionality with artistic beauty. 68. Chinese Embroidered Shoes (绣花鞋, Xiùhuā Xié) Origin: Song Dynasty Ethnicity: Han Chinese embroidered shoes, known as `xiùhuā xié` (绣花鞋), are traditional footwear decorated with intricate embroidery. The shoes are often made from silk or cotton and feature floral, animal, and symbolic designs. Embroidered shoes were historically worn by women and children, symbolizing beauty, elegance, and cultural identity. The craft involves skilled embroidery techniques, with each pair of shoes being a unique and artistic creation that reflects Chinese fashion and heritage. 69. Chinese Shadow Puppetry (皮影戏, Píyǐngxì) Origin: Han Dynasty Ethnicity: Han Chinese shadow puppetry, known as `píyǐngxì` (皮影戏), is a traditional form of entertainment that involves manipulating flat puppets made from leather or paper to create shadow images on a screen. The puppets are controlled by rods, and the performances are accompanied by music, narration, and singing. Shadow puppetry tells stories from Chinese folklore, history, and mythology, combining visual art, storytelling, and performance. This craft requires skill in puppet-making, manipulation, and theatrical presentation, preserving an important aspect of Chinese cultural heritage. 70. Chinese Dough Figurines (面人, Miànrén) Origin: Han Dynasty Ethnicity: Han Chinese dough figurines, known as `miànrén` (面人), are traditional folk art creations made from colored dough. Artisans shape the dough into various figures, such as animals, characters from folklore, and mythical beings. The process involves mixing flour with water and adding natural pigments to create vibrant colors. Dough figurines are popular at festivals and fairs, delighting audiences with their intricate details and imaginative designs. This craft combines artistic skill with cultural storytelling, preserving a unique aspect of Chinese folk art. 71. Chinese Porcelain (瓷器, Cíqì) Origin: Tang Dynasty Ethnicity: Han Chinese porcelain, known as `cíqì` (瓷器), is a highly esteemed type of ceramic ware that originated in China. It is made from a fine, white clay called kaolin and fired at high temperatures to achieve a smooth, glass-like finish. Chinese porcelain is known for its beauty, durability, and artistic designs, featuring intricate patterns and glazes. Famous types of Chinese porcelain include blue-and-white ware, celadon, and famille rose. Porcelain has been an important cultural and economic export, symbolizing Chinese craftsmanship and artistic excellence. 72. Tibetan Metal Craft (藏族金属工艺, Zàngzú Jīnshǔ Gōngyì) Origin: 7th Century Ethnicity: Tibetan Tibetan metal craft, known as `zàngzú jīnshǔ gōngyì` (藏族金属工艺), is a traditional art form that involves creating objects from metals such as gold, silver, and copper. Tibetan metal artisans produce items such as jewelry, religious artifacts, and household utensils, often featuring intricate designs and symbolic motifs. The craft combines techniques like casting, hammering, and engraving, showcasing the skill and creativity of Tibetan metalworkers. Tibetan metal craft reflects the cultural and spiritual heritage of the Tibetan people, with many pieces used in religious and ceremonial contexts. 73. Chinese Ceramic Sculptures (陶瓷雕塑, Táocí Diāosù) Origin: Neolithic Era Ethnicity: Han Chinese ceramic sculptures, known as `táocí diāosù` (陶瓷雕塑), are traditional art forms that involve sculpting clay into various figures and objects, then firing them at high temperatures to create durable and artistic pieces. These sculptures include figurines, animals, and decorative items, often featuring detailed and expressive designs. Chinese ceramic sculptures have been produced for thousands of years, reflecting the cultural, religious, and artistic achievements of different historical periods and regions in China. 74. Chinese Lacquerware (漆器, Qīqì) Origin: Neolithic Era Ethnicity: Han Chinese lacquerware, known as `qīqì` (漆器), is a traditional craft that involves coating objects with layers of lacquer to create a smooth, glossy finish. The process includes applying and polishing multiple layers of lacquer, often adding decorative elements such as inlays, carvings, and paintings. Lacquerware is used to make items such as boxes, trays, furniture, and accessories, valued for their beauty and durability. This craft combines artistic skill with technical expertise, showcasing the rich cultural heritage of Chinese lacquer artisans. 75. Chinese Bamboo Weaving (竹编, Zhúbiān) Origin: Han Dynasty Ethnicity: Han Chinese bamboo weaving, known as `zhúbiān` (竹编), is a traditional craft that involves creating various objects by weaving thin strips of bamboo. The craft includes making items such as baskets, mats, hats, and furniture, often featuring intricate patterns and designs. Bamboo weaving requires skill and precision, with artisans carefully selecting and preparing the bamboo before weaving it into the desired shape. This craft reflects the resourcefulness and creativity of Chinese artisans, utilizing natural materials to create functional and artistic products. 76. Tibetan Sand Mandala (沙坛城, Shā Tánchéng) Origin: 8th Century Ethnicity: Tibetan The Tibetan sand mandala, known as `shā tánchéng` (沙坛城), is a traditional form of Buddhist art that involves creating intricate designs with colored sand. Monks meticulously place grains of sand to form patterns and symbols representing the universe, deities, and spiritual concepts. The creation of a sand mandala is a meditative and ritualistic process, often taking days or weeks to complete. Once finished, the mandala is ceremonially destroyed to symbolize the impermanence of life. This craft combines artistic skill with spiritual practice, reflecting the deep cultural and religious traditions of Tibetan Buddhism. 77. Uyghur Dutar Making (都塔尔制作, Dūtǎěr Zhìzuò) Origin: Tang Dynasty Ethnicity: Uyghur Uyghur dutar making, known as `dūtǎěr zhìzuò` (都塔尔制作), is a traditional craft of the Uyghur ethnic group, involving the creation of the dutar, a two-stringed musical instrument. The dutar is made from wood, with a long neck and a pear-shaped body. The strings are traditionally made from gut, although modern versions may use nylon or metal strings. The making of a dutar involves woodworking, carving, and stringing, with artisans often adding decorative elements such as inlays and carvings. The dutar is an important part of Uyghur music and culture, used in folk songs, dances, and celebrations. 78. Chinese Paper Cutting (剪纸, Jiǎnzhǐ) Origin: Han Dynasty Ethnicity: Han Chinese paper cutting, known as `jiǎnzhǐ` (剪纸), is a traditional folk art that involves cutting intricate designs into paper. The art form is often used to create decorations for festivals, weddings, and other celebrations. Common themes include animals, flowers, and traditional symbols. Paper cuts are typically created using red paper, symbolizing good luck and happiness. This craft requires precision and creativity, with each piece being a unique work of art that reflects Chinese cultural values and traditions. 79. Dong Drum Tower Architecture (侗族鼓楼建筑, Dòngzú Gǔlóu Jiànzhù) Origin: Song Dynasty Ethnicity: Dong Dong drum tower architecture, known as `dòngzú gǔlóu jiànzhù` (侗族鼓楼建筑), is a traditional architectural style of the Dong ethnic group, characterized by multi-story wooden towers. These drum towers serve as community centers and are often used for meetings, ceremonies, and cultural events. The architecture features intricate woodwork, with interlocking beams and columns that require no nails. The towers are decorated with carvings and paintings, reflecting Dong cultural themes and aesthetics. Dong drum towers are a symbol of community identity and cohesion, showcasing the craftsmanship and architectural knowledge of the Dong people. 80. Miao Batik (苗族蜡染, Miáozú Làrǎn) Origin: Ming Dynasty Ethnicity: Miao Miao batik, known as `miáozú làrǎn` (苗族蜡染), is a traditional textile art of the Miao ethnic group, involving the use of wax and dye to create intricate patterns on cloth. The process includes applying wax to the fabric to create resist areas, then dyeing the cloth, and finally removing the wax to reveal the design. Miao batik features motifs inspired by nature, mythology, and daily life, often in bold and contrasting colors. This craft requires skill and creativity, with each piece being a unique expression of Miao cultural heritage and artistic tradition. 81. Chinese Seal Carving (篆刻, Zhuànkè) Origin: Zhou Dynasty Ethnicity: Han Chinese seal carving, known as `zhuànkè` (篆刻), is a traditional art form that involves carving characters and designs into seals, which are used to make imprints. The seals are typically made from materials such as stone, jade, or ivory, and are used in calligraphy, painting, and official documents. The process requires skill in carving and knowledge of ancient scripts and symbolism. Seal carving is a highly respected craft in Chinese culture, reflecting artistic expression and cultural heritage. 82. Uyghur Meshrep (麦西热甫, Màixīrèrèfǔ) Origin: Tang Dynasty Ethnicity: Uyghur Uyghur meshrep, known as `màixīrèrèfǔ` (麦西热甫), is a traditional cultural and social gathering of the Uyghur people, involving music, dance, poetry, and storytelling. Meshrep events are held to celebrate important occasions, such as weddings, festivals, and community milestones. The gatherings are characterized by lively performances, communal meals, and social interaction, reflecting the values and traditions of Uyghur culture. Meshrep plays a vital role in preserving and transmitting cultural heritage, fostering community cohesion and cultural identity. 83. Chinese Kesi Weaving (缂丝, Kèsī) Origin: Tang Dynasty Ethnicity: Han Chinese kesi weaving, known as `kèsī` (缂丝), is a traditional textile art that involves weaving intricate patterns and designs with silk threads. The process includes setting up a loom, creating a design, and meticulously weaving the silk to create detailed and vibrant images. Kesi weaving is known for its fine texture and rich colors, often depicting scenes from nature, mythology, and traditional Chinese culture. This craft requires great skill and patience, with each piece being a masterpiece of textile artistry. 84. Chinese Rattan Weaving (藤编, Téngbiān) Origin: Han Dynasty Ethnicity: Han Chinese rattan weaving, known as `téngbiān` (藤编), is a traditional craft that involves creating various objects by weaving thin strips of rattan. The craft includes making items such as baskets, furniture, and decorative pieces, often featuring intricate patterns and designs. Rattan weaving requires skill and precision, with artisans carefully selecting and preparing the rattan before weaving it into the desired shape. This craft reflects the resourcefulness and creativity of Chinese artisans, utilizing natural materials to create functional and artistic products. 85. Tibetan Thangka Painting (唐卡绘画, Tángkǎ Huìhuà) Origin: 7th Century Ethnicity: Tibetan Tibetan thangka painting, known as `tángkǎ huìhuà` (唐卡绘画), is a traditional form of Buddhist art that involves creating intricate and detailed paintings on cloth. Thangka paintings depict religious themes, such as deities, mandalas, and scenes from the life of the Buddha. The process includes preparing the cloth, sketching the design, and meticulously painting with natural pigments. Thangka paintings are used for meditation, teaching, and religious ceremonies, reflecting the spiritual and artistic heritage of Tibetan Buddhism. This craft requires artistic skill and devotion, with each piece being a sacred work of art. 86. Chinese Tofu Making (豆腐制作, Dòufǔ Zhìzuò) Origin: Han Dynasty Ethnicity: Han Chinese tofu making, known as `dòufǔ zhìzuò` (豆腐制作), is a traditional culinary craft that involves creating tofu from soybeans. The process includes soaking and grinding the soybeans, boiling the mixture, and coagulating the soy milk to form curds, which are then pressed into blocks. Tofu is a versatile and nutritious food, used in a wide variety of dishes in Chinese cuisine. The craft of tofu making reflects the ingenuity and culinary heritage of Chinese food culture, with each region having its own variations and specialties. 87. Chinese Lantern Making (灯笼制作, Dēnglóng Zhìzuò) Origin: Han Dynasty Ethnicity: Han Chinese lantern making, known as `dēnglóng zhìzuò` (灯笼制作), is a traditional craft that involves creating decorative lanterns from materials such as paper, silk, and bamboo. The process includes designing the lantern, constructing the frame, and adding decorative elements such as painting, calligraphy, and tassels. Lanterns are used for festivals, celebrations, and as decorative lighting, symbolizing light, hope, and happiness. This craft requires creativity and skill, with each lantern being a unique work of art that reflects Chinese cultural values and traditions. 88. Chinese Sugar Painting (糖画, Tánghuà) Origin: Ming Dynasty Ethnicity: Han Chinese sugar painting, known as `tánghuà` (糖画), is a traditional folk art that involves creating intricate designs with melted sugar. The process includes heating sugar until it melts, then using a ladle or spoon to pour the sugar onto a surface to form patterns and shapes. Common themes include animals, flowers, and traditional symbols. Sugar paintings are popular at festivals and fairs, delighting audiences with their intricate details and sweetness. This craft requires skill and creativity, with each piece being a unique and ephemeral work of art that reflects Chinese folk culture. 89. Chinese Tea Processing (茶叶加工, Cháyè Jiāgōng) Origin: Han Dynasty Ethnicity: Han Chinese tea processing, known as `cháyè jiāgōng` (茶叶加工), is a traditional craft that involves transforming freshly picked tea leaves into various types of tea. The process includes steps such as withering, rolling, oxidation, and drying, with different methods used to produce green tea, black tea, oolong tea, and other varieties. Tea processing requires knowledge of tea cultivation, processing techniques, and flavor profiles, ensuring the quality and distinctiveness of each type of tea. This craft reflects the rich cultural heritage and tradition of tea in Chinese society. 90. Chinese Tujia Brocade (土家族织锦, Tǔjiāzú Zhījǐn) Origin: Han Dynasty Ethnicity: Tujia Chinese Tujia brocade, known as `tǔjiāzú zhījǐn` (土家族织锦), is a traditional textile art of the Tujia ethnic group, involving the creation of colorful and intricate woven fabrics. The process includes setting up a loom, designing the pattern, and weaving the threads to create detailed and vibrant textiles. Tujia brocade features motifs inspired by nature, folklore, and daily life, often in bold and contrasting colors. This craft requires skill and creativity, with each piece being a unique expression of Tujia cultural heritage and artistic tradition. 91. Chinese Dong Embroidery (侗族刺绣, Dòngzú Cìxiù) Origin: Ming Dynasty Ethnicity: Dong Chinese Dong embroidery, known as `dòng zú cìxiù` (侗族刺绣), is a traditional textile art of the Dong ethnic group, involving the creation of intricate and colorful embroidered designs. The process includes drawing the design on cloth, selecting threads, and stitching the patterns using various embroidery techniques. Dong embroidery features motifs inspired by nature, folklore, and cultural symbols, often in vibrant colors and intricate details. This craft requires skill and creativity, with each piece being a unique expression of Dong cultural heritage and artistic tradition. 92. Chinese Paper Folding (折纸, Zhēzhǐ) Origin: Song Dynasty Ethnicity: Han Chinese paper folding, known as `zhézhǐ` (折纸), is a traditional folk art that involves folding paper into various shapes and figures. The art form is often used to create decorations, toys, and gifts, with common themes including animals, flowers, and traditional symbols. Paper folding requires skill and creativity, with each piece being a unique work of art that reflects Chinese cultural values and traditions. This craft combines artistic expression with technical skill, preserving an important aspect of Chinese folk culture. 93. Chinese Cloth Shoes Making (布鞋制作, Bùxié Zhìzuò) Origin: Han Dynasty Ethnicity: Han Chinese cloth shoes making, known as `bùxié zhìzuò` (布鞋制作), is a traditional craft that involves creating shoes from cloth materials. The process includes designing the shoe pattern, cutting the fabric, sewing the pieces together, and adding decorative elements such as embroidery and appliqué. Cloth shoes are valued for their comfort, durability, and cultural significance, often worn during festivals and special occasions. This craft requires skill and creativity, with each pair of shoes being a unique work of art that reflects Chinese cultural heritage and craftsmanship. 94. Chinese Blue and White Porcelain (青花瓷, Qīnghuācí) Origin: Yuan Dynasty Ethnicity: Han Chinese blue and white porcelain, known as `qīnghuācí` (青花瓷), is a highly esteemed type of ceramic ware that originated in China. It is characterized by its blue designs, often depicting landscapes, flowers, and traditional scenes, on a white background. The process includes forming the porcelain, applying the blue designs using cobalt oxide, and firing the piece at high temperatures. Blue and white porcelain is known for its beauty, durability, and artistic designs, symbolizing Chinese craftsmanship and artistic excellence. 95. Chinese Shadow Puppetry (皮影戏, Píyǐngxì) Origin: Han Dynasty Ethnicity: Han Chinese shadow puppetry, known as `píyǐngxì` (皮影戏), is a traditional form of theater that involves manipulating flat, articulated puppets made from leather to create shadows on a screen. The puppets are controlled by rods, and their movements are synchronized with music, dialogue, and narration to tell stories. Shadow puppetry often features themes from folklore, history, and mythology, combining visual art, storytelling, and performance. This craft requires skill in puppet-making, manipulation, and theatrical presentation, preserving an important aspect of Chinese cultural heritage. 96. Chinese Dough Figurines (面人, Miànrén) Origin: Han Dynasty Ethnicity: Han Chinese dough figurines, known as `miànrén` (面人), are traditional folk art creations made from colored dough. Artisans shape the dough into various figures, such as animals, characters from folklore, and mythical beings. The process involves mixing flour with water and adding natural pigments to create vibrant colors. Dough figurines are popular at festivals and fairs, delighting audiences with their intricate details and imaginative designs. This craft combines artistic skill with cultural storytelling, preserving a unique aspect of Chinese folk art. 97. Chinese Porcelain (瓷器, Cíqì) Origin: Tang Dynasty Ethnicity: Han Chinese porcelain, known as `cíqì` (瓷器), is a highly esteemed type of ceramic ware that originated in China. It is made from a fine, white clay called kaolin and fired at high temperatures to achieve a smooth, glass-like finish. Chinese porcelain is known for its beauty, durability, and artistic designs, featuring intricate patterns and glazes. Famous types of Chinese porcelain include blue-and-white ware, celadon, and famille rose. Porcelain has been an important cultural and economic export, symbolizing Chinese craftsmanship and artistic excellence. 98. Tibetan Metal Craft (藏族金属工艺, Zàngzú Jīnshǔ Gōngyì) Origin: 7th Century Ethnicity: Tibetan Tibetan metal craft, known as `zàngzú jīnshǔ gōngyì` (藏族金属工艺), is a traditional art form that involves creating objects from metals such as gold, silver, and copper. Tibetan metal artisans produce items such as jewelry, religious artifacts, and household utensils, often featuring intricate designs and symbolic motifs. The craft combines techniques like casting, hammering, and engraving, showcasing the skill and creativity of Tibetan metalworkers. Tibetan metal craft reflects the cultural and spiritual heritage of the Tibetan people, with many pieces used in religious and ceremonial contexts. 99. Chinese Ceramic Sculptures (陶瓷雕塑, Táocí Diāosù) Origin: Neolithic Era Ethnicity: Han Chinese ceramic sculptures, known as `táocí diāosù` (陶瓷雕塑), are traditional art forms that involve sculpting clay into various figures and objects, then firing them at high temperatures to create durable and artistic pieces. These sculptures include figurines, animals, and decorative items, often featuring detailed and expressive designs. Chinese ceramic sculptures have been produced for thousands of years, reflecting the cultural, religious, and artistic achievements of different historical periods and regions in China. 100. Chinese Lacquerware (漆器, Qīqì) Origin: Neolithic Era Ethnicity: Han Chinese lacquerware, known as `qīqì` (漆器), is a traditional craft that involves coating objects with layers of lacquer to create a smooth, glossy finish. The process includes applying and polishing multiple layers of lacquer, often adding decorative elements such as inlays, carvings, and paintings. Lacquerware is used to make items such as boxes, trays, furniture, and accessories, valued for their beauty and durability. This craft combines artistic skill with technical expertise, showcasing the rich cultural heritage of Chinese lacquer artisans. 101. Chinese Bamboo Weaving (竹编, Zhúbiān) Origin: Han Dynasty Ethnicity: Han Chinese bamboo weaving, known as `zhúbiān` (竹编), is a traditional craft that involves creating various objects by weaving thin strips of bamboo. The craft includes making items such as baskets, mats, hats, and furniture, often featuring intricate patterns and designs. Bamboo weaving requires skill and precision, with artisans carefully selecting and preparing the bamboo before weaving it into the desired shape. This craft reflects the resourcefulness and creativity of Chinese artisans, utilizing natural materials to create functional and artistic products.
Ten enduring fundamentals of China’s culture.     1. Harmony and Balance (和谐 Héxié)      Philosophical Roots: Derived from Confucianism, Daoism, and Buddhism, the concept of harmony emphasizes balance in social relationships, nature, and the universe. It promotes peaceful coexistence and cooperation.      Social Application: In social and business contexts, maintaining harmony is crucial. Conflicts are often resolved through negotiation and compromise to preserve social stability.            2. Family and Filial Piety (孝 Xiào)      Central Role of Family: The family is the cornerstone of Chinese society. Filial piety, respect for one’s parents and ancestors, is a key virtue.      Social Structure: Family obligations often take precedence over individual desires, reflecting the collective nature of Chinese culture.            3. Collectivism      Community Focus: Chinese culture emphasizes the importance of the group over the individual. This is evident in societal, family, and workplace dynamics.      Shared Responsibility: Successes and failures are often viewed as collective rather than individual, fostering a strong sense of community and mutual support.            4. Win-Win Philosophy (共赢 Gòngyíng)      Mutual Benefit: In business and diplomacy, the concept of win-win solutions is highly valued. It emphasizes creating outcomes that benefit all parties involved.      Long-Term Relationships: Building long-term relationships and mutual trust is prioritized over short-term gains.            5. Respect for Hierarchy and Authority      Confucian Influence: Respect for hierarchy is deeply ingrained, influenced by Confucian principles. This is evident in social, familial, and organizational structures.      Role of Elders and Leaders: Elders and leaders are accorded high respect and their opinions are given significant weight in decision-making processes.            6. Education and Continuous Learning      Value of Education: Education is highly valued and seen as a means to achieve personal and societal improvement. Historical reverence for scholars and intellectuals persists.      Meritocracy: Historically, the imperial examination system reinforced the importance of education and merit in attaining social status and governmental positions.            7. Adaptability and Pragmatism      Historical Adaptation: China has a long history of adapting to changing circumstances, whether through economic reforms or cultural assimilation.      Pragmatic Approach: Practical solutions are often favored over rigid adherence to ideology, allowing for flexibility in governance and daily life.            8. Respect for Tradition and Cultural Heritage      Preservation of Traditions: Despite modernization, traditional festivals, customs, and rituals remain integral to Chinese life.      Cultural Continuity: There`s a strong emphasis on preserving and passing down cultural heritage through generations.            9. Guanxi (关系) - Social Connections and Networks      Importance of Relationships: Building and maintaining relationships is crucial in both personal and professional contexts. Guanxi can provide social support, opportunities, and resources.      Reciprocity: Relationships are maintained through reciprocal exchanges of favors and support.            10. Yin and Yang (阴阳 Yīnyáng)      Philosophical Concept: Represents the duality and interconnectedness of opposites in the natural world. Balance between yin (passive, dark, feminine) and yang (active, light, masculine) is sought.      Application in Life: This concept influences various aspects of life, including health, environment, and personal relationships.            Conclusion      These enduring characteristics shape the Chinese worldview and influence behavior, relationships, and societal norms. Understanding these cultural elements provides valuable insights into the dynamics of Chinese society and its approach to both personal and professional interactions. These values continue to guide life in China into modernity and its international relations.
1. Harmony and Balance (和谐 Héxié) Philosophical Roots: Derived from Confucianism, Daoism, and Buddhism, the concept of harmony emphasizes balance in social relationships, nature, and the universe. It promotes peaceful coexistence and cooperation. Social Application: In social and business contexts, maintaining harmony is crucial. Conflicts are often resolved through negotiation and compromise to preserve social stability. 2. Family and Filial Piety (孝 Xiào) Central Role of Family: The family is the cornerstone of Chinese society. Filial piety, respect for one’s parents and ancestors, is a key virtue. Social Structure: Family obligations often take precedence over individual desires, reflecting the collective nature of Chinese culture. 3. Collectivism Community Focus: Chinese culture emphasizes the importance of the group over the individual. This is evident in societal, family, and workplace dynamics. Shared Responsibility: Successes and failures are often viewed as collective rather than individual, fostering a strong sense of community and mutual support. 4. Win-Win Philosophy (共赢 Gòngyíng) Mutual Benefit: In business and diplomacy, the concept of win-win solutions is highly valued. It emphasizes creating outcomes that benefit all parties involved. Long-Term Relationships: Building long-term relationships and mutual trust is prioritized over short-term gains. 5. Respect for Hierarchy and Authority Confucian Influence: Respect for hierarchy is deeply ingrained, influenced by Confucian principles. This is evident in social, familial, and organizational structures. Role of Elders and Leaders: Elders and leaders are accorded high respect and their opinions are given significant weight in decision-making processes. 6. Education and Continuous Learning Value of Education: Education is highly valued and seen as a means to achieve personal and societal improvement. Historical reverence for scholars and intellectuals persists. Meritocracy: Historically, the imperial examination system reinforced the importance of education and merit in attaining social status and governmental positions. 7. Adaptability and Pragmatism Historical Adaptation: China has a long history of adapting to changing circumstances, whether through economic reforms or cultural assimilation. Pragmatic Approach: Practical solutions are often favored over rigid adherence to ideology, allowing for flexibility in governance and daily life. 8. Respect for Tradition and Cultural Heritage Preservation of Traditions: Despite modernization, traditional festivals, customs, and rituals remain integral to Chinese life. Cultural Continuity: There`s a strong emphasis on preserving and passing down cultural heritage through generations. 9. Guanxi (关系) - Social Connections and Networks Importance of Relationships: Building and maintaining relationships is crucial in both personal and professional contexts. Guanxi can provide social support, opportunities, and resources. Reciprocity: Relationships are maintained through reciprocal exchanges of favors and support. 10. Yin and Yang (阴阳 Yīnyáng) Philosophical Concept: Represents the duality and interconnectedness of opposites in the natural world. Balance between yin (passive, dark, feminine) and yang (active, light, masculine) is sought. Application in Life: This concept influences various aspects of life, including health, environment, and personal relationships. Conclusion These enduring characteristics shape the Chinese worldview and influence behavior, relationships, and societal norms. Understanding these cultural elements provides valuable insights into the dynamics of Chinese society and its approach to both personal and professional interactions. These values continue to guide life in China into modernity and its international relations.
Why so many people prefer to live in China. Once in China, you won`t want to leave.    With Part Time Traveller - China ...        With BeeRose in China ...        With KING KWESI ...        With SNIDE ...
Once in China, you won`t want to leave. With Part Time Traveller - China ... With BeeRose in China ... With KING KWESI ... With SNIDE ...
A trip to LiShui, ZheJiang province. With Expat Natt ...        Bonus film - ZhuJiaJiao water town, just outside ShangHai (one can travel there by metro) : with Eoin and Aisling ...
With Expat Natt ... Bonus film - ZhuJiaJiao water town, just outside ShangHai (one can travel there by metro) : with Eoin and Aisling ...
The beautiful Tiger Leaping Gorge hike, YunNan province. With Flora and Note ...
With Flora and Note ...
DaLi ancient town walkabout, YunNan province. With Andy see the World ...
With Andy see the World ...
Taking an autonomous (driverless) taxi in BeiJing. With Yin`s Travel ...
With Yin`s Travel ...
This is XiaMen 厦门 city, FuJian province. With Valeriy Blank ...
With Valeriy Blank ...
This is BeiHai 北海 city, GuangXi province. With Valeriy Blank ...
With Valeriy Blank ...
The beautiful ShaXi ancient town, YunNan province. Don`t miss it !    With Panda Walking ...
Don`t miss it ! With Panda Walking ...
Simple Chinese language phrases to enhance your China trip (pinyin and pronunciation). PinYin - English : pronunciation.    ~ is used where there are two sounds in one syllable.    Ou[ch] means use the first sound of the word `ouch`; same sound as ow[l].    ***    Greetings    Nǐ Hǎo - Hello / Hi (literally, you good?)  : nee how    Zài Jiàn - Goodbye / bye  : z~eye jee~ann    HuānYíng (GuāngLín) - Welcome !  (You`ll often hear this when enter a restaurant)    DaJia Hao ! - Hello everybody !    ***    Introductions    Nǐ - you / your  : nee    Wǒ - I / my  : woh    What is your name? - Nǐ jiào shénme míngzì?  : Nee j~ou[ch] shen mer ming zuh?    My name is ... - Wǒ de míngzì shì ...  : Woh der ming zuh sh ...    ***    XièXiè - : Thanks  : shee~air shee~air (second is a little softer/quieter)    XièXiè Nǐ ! - Thank you!  : shee~air shee~air nee!    ***    DuìBuQǐ - Excuse me / sorry  : der boo chee    BúKèQì - No problem / you`re welcome  : boo ker chee    Mei guan xi - No problem / you`re welcome  : may goo~ann shee    Qǐng - Please  : ching    Mei / MeiHǎo - Beautiful  : may / may how    ***    Interations    DuWei - That`s right  : doo~way (quickly, and often said twice)    Yes and no have no direct translations in Chinese, but the following will be fine is answer to common questions, although they are more like `to be` and `not to be` if translated literally; however, these are real colloquial uses.    Bú shì - no  : boo shh    Bú shì can also be used in reply to `Thank you !` with the meaning `you`re welcome` / `no need to say` / `it`s nothing`    Shì de - yes  : shh der       E.g. LàJiāo ? - lah jee~ou[ch] (chillies ?)  :  Shì de / Bú shì    ***    Wǒ - I / me  : woh    Nǐ - You  : nee    Tā - He / she  : tah    ***    Shopping and restaurants    Wǒ Yào - I want / would like  I would like one of these  : Wǒ yào Yī ge Zhè ge (woh yow  ee guh  jay guh)    ***    ZhèGe - This  : jay guh    NàGe - That  : nay guh    ***    Yī Ge - One (of) : ee guh    Lian Ge - Two (of) : lee~ann guh  (Two as a simple number is Er, pronounced `are`)    Sān Ge - Three (of) : san guh    ***    Duō Shǎo Qián? - How much? (price)  : doo~or sh~ow[l] chee~ann?    Zhège duōshǎo qián? - How much is this?  : jay guh    Nàgè duōshǎo qián? - How much is that?  : nay guh    Tài Guì Le! - too expensive!  : tie gwee ler!    ***    nǐhǎo ma? - How are you?  : nee how mar ?    Hǎo De - ok  : how der    Hěn Hǎo - Good  : hen how    Bù Hǎo - Not good  : boo how    ***    ShénMe? - When?  : shen mer    NǎLi? - Where  : nah lee?    Nǎr - There (gesturing)  : nah    Qĭng wèn - Excuse me (before asking a stranger a question)  : ching wen    Qĭng wèn, weì shēng jiān (zài) nă lĭ? - Where is the restroom?  : Ching wen. Way sheng jee~ann z~eye (nah) lee?    Qĭng wèn, dìtiě zhàn (zài) nǎ lǐ? - Where is the metro station?  : Ching wen, dee tee~air z~eye (nah) lee?    You might hear zai nar in norther China (e.g. BeiJing)    ***    小 Xiǎo - Small  : sh~ow[l]    大 Dà - Big  : dah    Tai - Too  : tie    ***    Bin De - Ice-cold  : bin der    Lian De - Cold  : lee~ann der    Rè de - Hot  : rer der    Rè chá - hot tea  : rer char    Bīng píjiǔ - Cold beer  : bing pee jee~oh    ***    La - Spicy  : lah    Bu La - not spicy  : boo lah    Xiao La - a little spicy  : shee~ow[l] lah    Da La - Very spicy  : dah lah    Tai La! - too spicy!  : tie lah!    ***    Noodles - Miàn  : mee~ann    Dumplings - JiǎoZi  : jee~ow[l] zuh    Rice - MiFàn / Fàn  : mee fan / fan    Eggs - JīDàn  : jee dan    Beef - NiúRòu  牛肉 : nee~you row    Lamb - YángRòu  羊肉 : yang row    Chicken - JīRòu  鸡肉 : jee row    Pork - ZhūRòu  猪肉 : joo row    Fish - YúRòu  鱼肉 : yoo row    Tofu - DòuFu  豆腐 : doh foo    (See BeijingBuzzz`s food cheat sheet for much more)    (Wo) Chī bǎole! - (I`m) full!  :  Woh ch b~ou[ch] ler!    (Ni) Chī bǎole ma? - (Are you) full?  :  (Nee) ch b~ou[ch] ler maa?    Ma is appended to change a statement into a question.    ***    ZhōngGuó - China  : jong goo~woh    YīngGuó - England  : ying goo~woh    MěiGuó - America  : may goo~woh    ZhōngWén - Chinese nationality  : jong ren    YīngWén - English nationality  : ying ren    ***    Hótel - Hotel    FànDiàn - Hotel / Restaurant  : fan dee~ann    Wǒ Bù ZhīDào - I don`t know  : woh boo juh~dow    Tīng Bù Dǒng - I don`t understand  : ting boo dong    ZhèGe Duōshǎo Qián? / DuōShǎo Qián?  - How much is this?  : doo~or sh~ow[l} chee~ann?    Tài guìle !  - Too expensive !  : tie-gwee lah !    Wo Yao ...  - I would like ...  : woh yow ...    Wǒ Yào ZhèGe - I want this one  : woh yow jay~guh    ***    5 yuan (kwai) / 2 pieces (items)  5元 / 2个   or   5元 2个    8 折 (bā zhé), which directly translates as `8 discount`.   This means that the discounted price is 80% of the original price (20% off).     人 Rén - Person  : ren    5元 / 2人 - 5 yuan for 2 people    ***    For toilet doors / WCs :    男 - Man    女 - Woman    ***    BúShì - No  : boo shh    ShìDe - Yes  : Shh der    Hǎo de - Okay  : how der    MéiYǒu - none / out of stock  : may~oh    ***    Wǒ ài ... - I love ...  : woh eye ...    - I love this!  : woh eye jay-guh!    Wǒ ài ZhōngGuó - I love China  : woh eye jong goo~woh    ***    Hǎo Chī - Delicious (literally good eat)  : how ch    Bú Hǎo Chī - Not tasty  : boo how ch    One can think of `Bú` as meaning `not`    ***    Wǒ Bù LiǎoJiě - I don`t understand  : woh boo lee~ow[l]~jee~air    ***    Chi  - eat  : ch    Wǒ Xiǎng ... - I would like ...  : woh shee~ang ...    Wǒ Xiǎng Chī ... - I would like to eat ...  : woh she~ang ch ...    ***    Directions    Bei - North  : bay    Nan - South  : nan    Xi - West  : shee    Dong - East  : dong    ***    DìTiě - Subway train  : dee tee~air      Dìtiě nali ma? - Where is the subway?  : dee tee~air nah~lee ma    Zhan - Train station  : zahn    Men - gate  : men    Yuan / kwai - rmb (currency)  : yoo~ann / kw~eye (more common)    Gong yuan - Park  : gong yoo~ann    ***    KāFēi - Coffee  : kah fay    Chá - Tea  : chah    kěLè - Cola  : ker ler    PiJiou - Beer  : pee jee~oh    Shui - Water  : shway    Wo yao liang ge pijiou liande - I would like two cold beers  : woh yow[l] lee~ann guh pee jee~oh lee~ann der    ***    Jia Yo! - Let`s go! / Go! (encouraging) : jee~ah yoh!    Wǒ Bù Shuō Hànyǔ / ZhōngWén - I don`t speak Chinese  (huh?!)  Or simply Bù ZhōngWén  : boo jong wen    ***    Numbers    Numbers are easy (there are finger position numbers too, but that`s not so easy) :    1 - Yī  : ee    2 - Èr  : are    3 - Sān  : san    4 - Sì  : si (the sound is the first half of `soot`) (short sound)    5 - Wǔ  : woo~oh    6 - Liù  : lee~oo    7 - Qī  : chee    8 - Bā  : bah    9 - Jiǔ  : jee~oo    10 - Shí  : shhh (longer sound)    Example of 11 - 99 :    73 - Qi Shí Sān (7x10) + 3  : chee shhh san (7 10 3)    70 - Qi Shí (7x10)  : chee shhh (7 10)    100 - Bǎi  : buy    Example of 101 - 999 :    357 - Sān Bǎi Wǔ Shí Qī (3x100 + 5x10 + 7)  : san buy woo~oh shhh chee (3 100 5 10 7)    300 - Sān Bǎi (3x100)  : san buy (3 100)    One small complication - two (of) - rather than the number two) is liǎng ge  : lee~ang ger    ***    Cheers! - GānBēi!  : gan bey!
PinYin - English : pronunciation. ~ is used where there are two sounds in one syllable. Ou[ch] means use the first sound of the word `ouch`; same sound as ow[l]. *** Greetings Nǐ Hǎo - Hello / Hi (literally, you good?) : nee how Zài Jiàn - Goodbye / bye : z~eye jee~ann HuānYíng (GuāngLín) - Welcome ! (You`ll often hear this when enter a restaurant) DaJia Hao ! - Hello everybody ! *** Introductions Nǐ - you / your : nee Wǒ - I / my : woh What is your name? - Nǐ jiào shénme míngzì? : Nee j~ou[ch] shen mer ming zuh? My name is ... - Wǒ de míngzì shì ... : Woh der ming zuh sh ... *** XièXiè - : Thanks : shee~air shee~air (second is a little softer/quieter) XièXiè Nǐ ! - Thank you! : shee~air shee~air nee! *** DuìBuQǐ - Excuse me / sorry : der boo chee BúKèQì - No problem / you`re welcome : boo ker chee Mei guan xi - No problem / you`re welcome : may goo~ann shee Qǐng - Please : ching Mei / MeiHǎo - Beautiful : may / may how *** Interations DuWei - That`s right : doo~way (quickly, and often said twice) Yes and no have no direct translations in Chinese, but the following will be fine is answer to common questions, although they are more like `to be` and `not to be` if translated literally; however, these are real colloquial uses. Bú shì - no : boo shh Bú shì can also be used in reply to `Thank you !` with the meaning `you`re welcome` / `no need to say` / `it`s nothing` Shì de - yes : shh der E.g. LàJiāo ? - lah jee~ou[ch] (chillies ?) : Shì de / Bú shì *** Wǒ - I / me : woh Nǐ - You : nee Tā - He / she : tah *** Shopping and restaurants Wǒ Yào - I want / would like I would like one of these : Wǒ yào Yī ge Zhè ge (woh yow ee guh jay guh) *** ZhèGe - This : jay guh NàGe - That : nay guh *** Yī Ge - One (of) : ee guh Lian Ge - Two (of) : lee~ann guh (Two as a simple number is Er, pronounced `are`) Sān Ge - Three (of) : san guh *** Duō Shǎo Qián? - How much? (price) : doo~or sh~ow[l] chee~ann? Zhège duōshǎo qián? - How much is this? : jay guh Nàgè duōshǎo qián? - How much is that? : nay guh Tài Guì Le! - too expensive! : tie gwee ler! *** nǐhǎo ma? - How are you? : nee how mar ? Hǎo De - ok : how der Hěn Hǎo - Good : hen how Bù Hǎo - Not good : boo how *** ShénMe? - When? : shen mer NǎLi? - Where : nah lee? Nǎr - There (gesturing) : nah Qĭng wèn - Excuse me (before asking a stranger a question) : ching wen Qĭng wèn, weì shēng jiān (zài) nă lĭ? - Where is the restroom? : Ching wen. Way sheng jee~ann z~eye (nah) lee? Qĭng wèn, dìtiě zhàn (zài) nǎ lǐ? - Where is the metro station? : Ching wen, dee tee~air z~eye (nah) lee? You might hear zai nar in norther China (e.g. BeiJing) *** 小 Xiǎo - Small : sh~ow[l] 大 Dà - Big : dah Tai - Too : tie *** Bin De - Ice-cold : bin der Lian De - Cold : lee~ann der Rè de - Hot : rer der Rè chá - hot tea : rer char Bīng píjiǔ - Cold beer : bing pee jee~oh *** La - Spicy : lah Bu La - not spicy : boo lah Xiao La - a little spicy : shee~ow[l] lah Da La - Very spicy : dah lah Tai La! - too spicy! : tie lah! *** Noodles - Miàn : mee~ann Dumplings - JiǎoZi : jee~ow[l] zuh Rice - MiFàn / Fàn : mee fan / fan Eggs - JīDàn : jee dan Beef - NiúRòu 牛肉 : nee~you row Lamb - YángRòu 羊肉 : yang row Chicken - JīRòu 鸡肉 : jee row Pork - ZhūRòu 猪肉 : joo row Fish - YúRòu 鱼肉 : yoo row Tofu - DòuFu 豆腐 : doh foo (See BeijingBuzzz`s food cheat sheet for much more) (Wo) Chī bǎole! - (I`m) full! : Woh ch b~ou[ch] ler! (Ni) Chī bǎole ma? - (Are you) full? : (Nee) ch b~ou[ch] ler maa? Ma is appended to change a statement into a question. *** ZhōngGuó - China : jong goo~woh YīngGuó - England : ying goo~woh MěiGuó - America : may goo~woh ZhōngWén - Chinese nationality : jong ren YīngWén - English nationality : ying ren *** Hótel - Hotel FànDiàn - Hotel / Restaurant : fan dee~ann Wǒ Bù ZhīDào - I don`t know : woh boo juh~dow Tīng Bù Dǒng - I don`t understand : ting boo dong ZhèGe Duōshǎo Qián? / DuōShǎo Qián? - How much is this? : doo~or sh~ow[l} chee~ann? Tài guìle ! - Too expensive ! : tie-gwee lah ! Wo Yao ... - I would like ... : woh yow ... Wǒ Yào ZhèGe - I want this one : woh yow jay~guh *** 5 yuan (kwai) / 2 pieces (items) 5元 / 2个 or 5元 2个 8 折 (bā zhé), which directly translates as `8 discount`. This means that the discounted price is 80% of the original price (20% off). 人 Rén - Person : ren 5元 / 2人 - 5 yuan for 2 people *** For toilet doors / WCs : 男 - Man 女 - Woman *** BúShì - No : boo shh ShìDe - Yes : Shh der Hǎo de - Okay : how der MéiYǒu - none / out of stock : may~oh *** Wǒ ài ... - I love ... : woh eye ... - I love this! : woh eye jay-guh! Wǒ ài ZhōngGuó - I love China : woh eye jong goo~woh *** Hǎo Chī - Delicious (literally good eat) : how ch Bú Hǎo Chī - Not tasty : boo how ch One can think of `Bú` as meaning `not` *** Wǒ Bù LiǎoJiě - I don`t understand : woh boo lee~ow[l]~jee~air *** Chi - eat : ch Wǒ Xiǎng ... - I would like ... : woh shee~ang ... Wǒ Xiǎng Chī ... - I would like to eat ... : woh she~ang ch ... *** Directions Bei - North : bay Nan - South : nan Xi - West : shee Dong - East : dong *** DìTiě - Subway train : dee tee~air Dìtiě nali ma? - Where is the subway? : dee tee~air nah~lee ma Zhan - Train station : zahn Men - gate : men Yuan / kwai - rmb (currency) : yoo~ann / kw~eye (more common) Gong yuan - Park : gong yoo~ann *** KāFēi - Coffee : kah fay Chá - Tea : chah kěLè - Cola : ker ler PiJiou - Beer : pee jee~oh Shui - Water : shway Wo yao liang ge pijiou liande - I would like two cold beers : woh yow[l] lee~ann guh pee jee~oh lee~ann der *** Jia Yo! - Let`s go! / Go! (encouraging) : jee~ah yoh! Wǒ Bù Shuō Hànyǔ / ZhōngWén - I don`t speak Chinese (huh?!) Or simply Bù ZhōngWén : boo jong wen *** Numbers Numbers are easy (there are finger position numbers too, but that`s not so easy) : 1 - Yī : ee 2 - Èr : are 3 - Sān : san 4 - Sì : si (the sound is the first half of `soot`) (short sound) 5 - Wǔ : woo~oh 6 - Liù : lee~oo 7 - Qī : chee 8 - Bā : bah 9 - Jiǔ : jee~oo 10 - Shí : shhh (longer sound) Example of 11 - 99 : 73 - Qi Shí Sān (7x10) + 3 : chee shhh san (7 10 3) 70 - Qi Shí (7x10) : chee shhh (7 10) 100 - Bǎi : buy Example of 101 - 999 : 357 - Sān Bǎi Wǔ Shí Qī (3x100 + 5x10 + 7) : san buy woo~oh shhh chee (3 100 5 10 7) 300 - Sān Bǎi (3x100) : san buy (3 100) One small complication - two (of) - rather than the number two) is liǎng ge : lee~ang ger *** Cheers! - GānBēi! : gan bey!
Nine million bicycles in Beijing, but you’re the one I love, most of all. Flashback Thursday.  2011.    With youkiame ...
Flashback Thursday. 2011. With youkiame ...
Road trip idea from BeiJingBuzzz – DaLi, YunNan to Lhasa, Tibet / XiZang (2-4 weeks; two alternate routes). Scenic Road Trip Routes from Dali to Lhasa            Route Overview      Traveling from Dali to Lhasa is an epic journey through some of China`s most stunning landscapes. Here are two detailed scenic routes with notable stops along the way:                 Route 1: Northern Route      Day 1-2: Dali to Lijiang (Approx. 180 km)      Route: Take the G214 National Road north from Dali to Lijiang.      Highlights: Enjoy the scenic views along the way, including Erhai Lake and the ancient town of Lijiang.            Day 3-4: Lijiang to Shangri-La (Zhongdian) (Approx. 180 km)      Route: Continue on G214 National Road north to Shangri-La.      Highlights: Visit Tiger Leaping Gorge and enjoy the views of the Jade Dragon Snow Mountain.            Day 5: Shangri-La to Deqin (Approx. 180 km)      Route: Stay on G214 National Road heading north to Deqin.      Highlights: Explore Songzanlin Monastery in Shangri-La and enjoy the panoramic views of Meili Snow Mountain in Deqin.            Day 6: Deqin to Markam (Approx. 220 km)      Route: Take the G214 National Road, crossing into Tibet and continue to Markam.      Highlights: Pass through the spectacular mountainous regions and along the Mekong River.            Day 7: Markam to Zogang (Approx. 150 km)      Route: From Markam, take the G318 National Road west towards Zogang.      Highlights: Experience the dramatic high-altitude landscapes and valleys.            Day 8: Zogang to Baxoi (Approx. 120 km)      Route: Continue on the G318 National Road from Zogang to Baxoi.      Highlights: Enjoy the rugged and scenic terrain along the way.            Day 9: Baxoi to Ranwu (Approx. 160 km)      Route: Stay on the G318 National Road heading west to Ranwu.      Highlights: Pass by the beautiful Ranwu Lake, known for its clear waters and stunning reflections.            Day 10: Ranwu to Bomi (Approx. 130 km)      Route: Continue on G318 National Road from Ranwu to Bomi.      Highlights: Drive through lush forests and alongside beautiful rivers.            Day 11: Bomi to Nyingchi (Approx. 230 km)      Route: Continue on G318 National Road from Bomi to Nyingchi.      Highlights: Enjoy the lush scenery of Nyingchi, known for its forests and the Niyang River.            Day 12-13: Nyingchi to Lhasa (Approx. 400 km)      Route: Take the G318 National Road west from Nyingchi to Lhasa.      Highlights: Pass through Mila Mountain and follow the Yarlung Tsangpo River Gorge. In Lhasa, explore the Potala Palace, Jokhang Temple, and Barkhor Street.                 Route 2: Southern Route      Day 1-2: Dali to Kunming (Approx. 340 km)      Route: Take the G56 Hangrui Expressway east from Dali to Kunming.      Highlights: Kunming, known as the `Spring City,` offers attractions like the Stone Forest (Shilin), Dianchi Lake, and Green Lake Park.            Day 3: Kunming to Panzhihua (Approx. 310 km)      Route: Continue on the G56 Hangrui Expressway north to Panzhihua.      Highlights: Panzhihua, a city built around the steel industry, provides access to scenic spots like the Jinsha River and nearby hot springs.            Day 4: Panzhihua to Xichang (Approx. 260 km)      Route: Take the G5 Beijing-Kunming Expressway north to Xichang.      Highlights: Xichang is known for Qionghai Lake and the Luoji Mountain scenic area. It`s also a gateway to the Liangshan Yi Autonomous Prefecture.            Day 5: Xichang to Kangding (Approx. 380 km)      Route: Continue on the G5 Beijing-Kunming Expressway, then take the G318 National Road west to Kangding.      Highlights: Kangding is famous for its stunning mountain scenery, including Gongga Mountain (Minya Konka), and the beautiful Mugecuo Scenic Area.            Day 6: Kangding to Litang (Approx. 280 km)      Route: Take the G318 National Road west from Kangding to Litang.      Highlights: Litang, one of the highest towns in the world at 4,014 meters, is known for its Tibetan culture and the Litang Monastery.            Day 7: Litang to Batang (Approx. 160 km)      Route: Continue on the G318 National Road west to Batang.      Highlights: Batang is a charming Tibetan town with picturesque landscapes and rich cultural heritage.            Day 8: Batang to Markam (Approx. 160 km)      Route: Cross into Tibet and stay on the G318 National Road to Markam.      Highlights: Scenic mountain vistas and the Mekong River valley.            Day 9: Markam to Zogang (Approx. 150 km)      Route: Continue on the G318 National Road from Markam to Zogang.      Highlights: Stunning high-altitude terrain and valleys.            Day 10: Zogang to Baxoi (Approx. 120 km)      Route: Stay on the G318 National Road heading west to Baxoi.      Highlights: Enjoy the rugged and scenic terrain along the way.            Day 11: Baxoi to Ranwu (Approx. 160 km)      Route: Continue on the G318 National Road from Baxoi to Ranwu.      Highlights: Pass by the beautiful Ranwu Lake, known for its clear waters and stunning reflections.            Day 12: Ranwu to Bomi (Approx. 130 km)      Route: Continue on G318 National Road from Ranwu to Bomi.      Highlights: Drive through lush forests and alongside beautiful rivers.            Day 13: Bomi to Nyingchi (Approx. 230 km)      Route: Continue on G318 National Road from Bomi to Nyingchi.      Highlights: Enjoy the lush scenery of Nyingchi, known for its forests and the Niyang River.            Day 14: Nyingchi to Lhasa (Approx. 400 km)      Route: Take the G318 National Road west from Nyingchi to Lhasa.      Highlights: Pass through Mila Mountain and follow the Yarlung Tsangpo River Gorge. In Lhasa, explore the Potala Palace, Jokhang Temple, and Barkhor Street.                 Tips for the Journey                Permits: Ensure you have the necessary permits to travel in Tibet. Foreign tourists need a Tibet Travel Permit.          Vehicle: A sturdy 4x4 vehicle is recommended due to the rough terrain and high altitudes.          Altitude Sickness: Be prepared for high altitudes. Acclimate gradually and consider medication for altitude sickness.          Weather: Check the weather conditions, especially in winter, as some roads may be impassable.          Supplies: Carry sufficient food, water, and emergency supplies, as some areas are remote with few facilities.              These road trips offers a blend of cultural experiences, breathtaking landscapes, and a sense of adventure, making it one of the most scenic routes in China.     
Scenic Road Trip Routes from Dali to Lhasa Route Overview Traveling from Dali to Lhasa is an epic journey through some of China`s most stunning landscapes. Here are two detailed scenic routes with notable stops along the way:   Route 1: Northern Route Day 1-2: Dali to Lijiang (Approx. 180 km) Route: Take the G214 National Road north from Dali to Lijiang. Highlights: Enjoy the scenic views along the way, including Erhai Lake and the ancient town of Lijiang. Day 3-4: Lijiang to Shangri-La (Zhongdian) (Approx. 180 km) Route: Continue on G214 National Road north to Shangri-La. Highlights: Visit Tiger Leaping Gorge and enjoy the views of the Jade Dragon Snow Mountain. Day 5: Shangri-La to Deqin (Approx. 180 km) Route: Stay on G214 National Road heading north to Deqin. Highlights: Explore Songzanlin Monastery in Shangri-La and enjoy the panoramic views of Meili Snow Mountain in Deqin. Day 6: Deqin to Markam (Approx. 220 km) Route: Take the G214 National Road, crossing into Tibet and continue to Markam. Highlights: Pass through the spectacular mountainous regions and along the Mekong River. Day 7: Markam to Zogang (Approx. 150 km) Route: From Markam, take the G318 National Road west towards Zogang. Highlights: Experience the dramatic high-altitude landscapes and valleys. Day 8: Zogang to Baxoi (Approx. 120 km) Route: Continue on the G318 National Road from Zogang to Baxoi. Highlights: Enjoy the rugged and scenic terrain along the way. Day 9: Baxoi to Ranwu (Approx. 160 km) Route: Stay on the G318 National Road heading west to Ranwu. Highlights: Pass by the beautiful Ranwu Lake, known for its clear waters and stunning reflections. Day 10: Ranwu to Bomi (Approx. 130 km) Route: Continue on G318 National Road from Ranwu to Bomi. Highlights: Drive through lush forests and alongside beautiful rivers. Day 11: Bomi to Nyingchi (Approx. 230 km) Route: Continue on G318 National Road from Bomi to Nyingchi. Highlights: Enjoy the lush scenery of Nyingchi, known for its forests and the Niyang River. Day 12-13: Nyingchi to Lhasa (Approx. 400 km) Route: Take the G318 National Road west from Nyingchi to Lhasa. Highlights: Pass through Mila Mountain and follow the Yarlung Tsangpo River Gorge. In Lhasa, explore the Potala Palace, Jokhang Temple, and Barkhor Street.   Route 2: Southern Route Day 1-2: Dali to Kunming (Approx. 340 km) Route: Take the G56 Hangrui Expressway east from Dali to Kunming. Highlights: Kunming, known as the `Spring City,` offers attractions like the Stone Forest (Shilin), Dianchi Lake, and Green Lake Park. Day 3: Kunming to Panzhihua (Approx. 310 km) Route: Continue on the G56 Hangrui Expressway north to Panzhihua. Highlights: Panzhihua, a city built around the steel industry, provides access to scenic spots like the Jinsha River and nearby hot springs. Day 4: Panzhihua to Xichang (Approx. 260 km) Route: Take the G5 Beijing-Kunming Expressway north to Xichang. Highlights: Xichang is known for Qionghai Lake and the Luoji Mountain scenic area. It`s also a gateway to the Liangshan Yi Autonomous Prefecture. Day 5: Xichang to Kangding (Approx. 380 km) Route: Continue on the G5 Beijing-Kunming Expressway, then take the G318 National Road west to Kangding. Highlights: Kangding is famous for its stunning mountain scenery, including Gongga Mountain (Minya Konka), and the beautiful Mugecuo Scenic Area. Day 6: Kangding to Litang (Approx. 280 km) Route: Take the G318 National Road west from Kangding to Litang. Highlights: Litang, one of the highest towns in the world at 4,014 meters, is known for its Tibetan culture and the Litang Monastery. Day 7: Litang to Batang (Approx. 160 km) Route: Continue on the G318 National Road west to Batang. Highlights: Batang is a charming Tibetan town with picturesque landscapes and rich cultural heritage. Day 8: Batang to Markam (Approx. 160 km) Route: Cross into Tibet and stay on the G318 National Road to Markam. Highlights: Scenic mountain vistas and the Mekong River valley. Day 9: Markam to Zogang (Approx. 150 km) Route: Continue on the G318 National Road from Markam to Zogang. Highlights: Stunning high-altitude terrain and valleys. Day 10: Zogang to Baxoi (Approx. 120 km) Route: Stay on the G318 National Road heading west to Baxoi. Highlights: Enjoy the rugged and scenic terrain along the way. Day 11: Baxoi to Ranwu (Approx. 160 km) Route: Continue on the G318 National Road from Baxoi to Ranwu. Highlights: Pass by the beautiful Ranwu Lake, known for its clear waters and stunning reflections. Day 12: Ranwu to Bomi (Approx. 130 km) Route: Continue on G318 National Road from Ranwu to Bomi. Highlights: Drive through lush forests and alongside beautiful rivers. Day 13: Bomi to Nyingchi (Approx. 230 km) Route: Continue on G318 National Road from Bomi to Nyingchi. Highlights: Enjoy the lush scenery of Nyingchi, known for its forests and the Niyang River. Day 14: Nyingchi to Lhasa (Approx. 400 km) Route: Take the G318 National Road west from Nyingchi to Lhasa. Highlights: Pass through Mila Mountain and follow the Yarlung Tsangpo River Gorge. In Lhasa, explore the Potala Palace, Jokhang Temple, and Barkhor Street.   Tips for the Journey Permits: Ensure you have the necessary permits to travel in Tibet. Foreign tourists need a Tibet Travel Permit. Vehicle: A sturdy 4x4 vehicle is recommended due to the rough terrain and high altitudes. Altitude Sickness: Be prepared for high altitudes. Acclimate gradually and consider medication for altitude sickness. Weather: Check the weather conditions, especially in winter, as some roads may be impassable. Supplies: Carry sufficient food, water, and emergency supplies, as some areas are remote with few facilities. These road trips offers a blend of cultural experiences, breathtaking landscapes, and a sense of adventure, making it one of the most scenic routes in China.  
The tide turns on the West’s financial imperialism. With Michael Hudson and Richard Wolff ...        Bonus film - with Ben Norton ...
With Michael Hudson and Richard Wolff ... Bonus film - with Ben Norton ...
Tourists reveal the real China. The West`s MSM`s lies are being increasingly exposed.    Visitors to China are usually `shocked` to find out the reality of life in China, and that they had been lied to by their own governments.    The people are friendly; because they are happy; because China is harmonious and successful and builds infrastructure and takes care of all of the people.    With Trip Bitten ...
The West`s MSM`s lies are being increasingly exposed. Visitors to China are usually `shocked` to find out the reality of life in China, and that they had been lied to by their own governments. The people are friendly; because they are happy; because China is harmonious and successful and builds infrastructure and takes care of all of the people. With Trip Bitten ...

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BeiJing 北京 and TianJin 天津 videos

BeiJing city, the capital of China, lies with BeiJing municiality, like a small province. BeiJing has many UNESCO World Heritage Sites including the Forbidden City, Summer Palace, Temple of Heaven and sections of the Great Wall of China. However, a rich architectural and cultural heritage is combined with many modern features. With two huge international airports, BeiJing is well connected with the world and a popular tourist destination.

Snow fall at the Forbidden City, BeiJing.   Bonus film - ZhongShan Park ...
Bonus film - ZhongShan Park ...
Universal Studios, BeiJing, opens. With Wei`s Travel ...
With Wei`s Travel ...
Discover BeiJing 北京 – past and present. Learn more about the modern capital with a rich historical past. Welcome to the blue sky city of Beijing.  A great film by ABC7 ...
Learn more about the modern capital with a rich historical past. Welcome to the blue sky city of Beijing. A great film by ABC7 ...
QianMen, BeiJing flash mob …. Beautiful music on National Day, October 1st, 2018, in the blue sky city.  `I love you, China`, 我爱你,中国, Wǒ ài nǐ, ZhōngGuó ...    Bonus film - a flash mob dance ...
Beautiful music on National Day, October 1st, 2018, in the blue sky city. `I love you, China`, 我爱你,中国, Wǒ ài nǐ, ZhōngGuó ... Bonus film - a flash mob dance ...
Street food breakfast tour in TianJin 天津.
Seasonal lights and New Year countdown in BeiJing 北京. The first film features WangFuJing, XiDan and the Solana Center in ChaoYang Park.  The second film shows the New Year countdown celebrations at The Place, which features the world`s largest overhead LED display.
The first film features WangFuJing, XiDan and the Solana Center in ChaoYang Park. The second film shows the New Year countdown celebrations at The Place, which features the world`s largest overhead LED display.


ShangHai 上海 videos

ShangHai is known for dynamism, style, and its international, modern aspects, yet has historical features too, such as the famous Bund along the HuangPu River, with its colonial era architecture. On the other side of the river lies the futuristic looking PuDong district which has quickly made ShangHai a leading financial center. Yet the city also has many traditional places too, such as the beautiful YuYuan Garden, Jade Buddha Temple and ZhuJiaJiao water town.

Video : China : Fountains and lights show, ShangHai 上海 World Expo – video `Better City - Better Life`. May 1st to October 31st 2010. Awesome ...
`Better City - Better Life`. May 1st to October 31st 2010. Awesome ...
Video : China : ShangHai light show – celebrations begin for the 100 years anniversary of the CPC on July 1st 2021     Plus, BeiJing ...        And more ...
Plus, BeiJing ... And more ...
Video : China : A journey through China 中国 – feature length BeiJing, Xi`An and ShangHai. A feature-length film.    With Dennis Hurd ...
BeiJing, Xi`An and ShangHai. A feature-length film. With Dennis Hurd ...
Video : China : Moon Festival night walk at Yu Garden in ShangHai With Wei`s Travel ...
With Wei`s Travel ...
Video : China : National Day (1st October) night walk in ShangHai With Wei`s Travel ...    Yu Garden daytime walk ...    Bonus film - XuJiaHui business district ...    Bonus film 2 - The largest Sam`s Club China flagship opening 最大山姆会员中国旗舰店上海开幕日 - with Wei`s Travel ...
With Wei`s Travel ... Yu Garden daytime walk ... Bonus film - XuJiaHui business district ... Bonus film 2 - The largest Sam`s Club China flagship opening 最大山姆会员中国旗舰店上海开幕日 - with Wei`s Travel ...
Video : China : Spring is (almost) here ! With FunFancie and Ben Coleman in HangZhou ...        And in ShangHai ...        With FunFancie in ShangHai ...
With FunFancie and Ben Coleman in HangZhou ... And in ShangHai ... With FunFancie in ShangHai ...


GuangDong 广东 : GuangZhou, ShenZhen videos

Inside Chinese smartphone giant HuaWei’s ShenZhen headquarters
An fascinating look inside the massive campus ... And also a quick look at BaiDu`s campus in BeiJing ... And TenCent (WeChat)`s HQ in ShenZhen ... Bonus films ...
ShenZhen night walk in Talent Park
With Walk For You ... Bonus films : - LuoHu district, ShenZhen ... - Coco Park, ShenZhen ... - QianHai MixC, Free Trade Zone, ShenZhen ... - OCT Harbour / OCT Harbor, ShenZhen ...
FoShan night walk
GuangDong province. With Walk East ...


YunNan 云南 : LiJiang, DaLi, Tiger Leaping Gorge videos

Street food tour in DaLi 大理, YunNan province
ShaXi ancient town, YunNan province
Between DaLi and LiJiang. With Flora and Note ...
A trip to LiJiang, Jade Dragon Snow Mountain and Tiger Leaping Gorge, YunNan province – don’t miss it !
`Relax and hold on tight`. With Gone With The Wynns ... Bonus films - Tiger Leaping Gorge - with Amazing Places on Our Planet ... With DuckTravel ...
YunNan vegetable feast
With DianXi XiaoGe ...
HaNi rice terraces, YuanYang, HongHe, YunNan province
With Little Chinese Everywhere ... The Hani rice terraces are a spectacular example of ancient agricultural engineering located in the Yuanyang County of Yunnan Province, China. These terraces are renowned for their beauty and cultural significance, as well as their sustainable farming practices that have been maintained for over a millennium. Historical and Cultural Background Origins and History The Hani people, an ethnic minority in China, began constructing these terraces around 1,300 years ago. They transformed the steep slopes of the Ailao Mountains into a series of stepped terraces, making the land suitable for rice cultivation. Cultural Significance The terraces are not just a testament to agricultural ingenuity but also a reflection of the Hani culture and their harmonious relationship with nature. The Hani people believe in a symbiotic relationship with their environment, which is reflected in their farming practices, spiritual beliefs, and festivals. Agricultural Practices Irrigation System A sophisticated irrigation system channels water from the forested mountaintops down through the terraces. This system ensures a stable water supply, critical for the cultivation of rice. Sustainability The Hani terraces are an example of sustainable farming, with practices that preserve soil fertility and biodiversity. Crop rotation and the use of natural fertilizers are integral parts of their agricultural methods. Natural and Scenic Beauty Visual Appeal The terraces are most visually striking during the planting season when the fields are filled with water, reflecting the sky and creating a mirror-like effect. During different seasons, the terraces change colors, ranging from the vibrant green of growing rice to the golden hues of the harvest season. Tourism The terraces attract tourists from around the world, especially photographers and nature enthusiasts. Key viewing points include Duoyishu, Bada, and Laohuzui, each offering breathtaking views of the terraces at different times of the day. UNESCO World Heritage Status Recognition In 2013, the Hani rice terraces were designated a UNESCO World Heritage Site. This recognition underscores their cultural and historical importance, as well as their unique agricultural landscape. Conservation Efforts Efforts are underway to preserve this heritage site, focusing on maintaining the traditional farming practices and protecting the environment from modern threats such as tourism pressure and climate change. Conclusion The Hani rice terraces are a remarkable blend of human ingenuity and natural beauty. They represent the Hani people`s enduring relationship with their land, showcasing a sustainable agricultural system that has thrived for centuries. As both a cultural treasure and a stunning visual spectacle, the Hani rice terraces continue to captivate and inspire visitors from around the globe.
Exquisite lodges in the most beautiful locations on the Tibetan plateau
Experience the rich culture and breathtaking scenery ...


SiChuan 四川 & ChongQing 重庆 : ChengDu, EmeiShan, JiuZhaiGou, LeShan videos

Yellow River highlands scenery in SiChuan province
With Little Chinese Everywhere ...
50 places to visit in ChongQing
ChongQing: 20 Kid-Friendly Places to Visit Chongqing Zoo (重庆动物园 Chóngqìng Dòngwùyuán): Visit pandas, tigers, and other animals in this zoo. Huguang Guild Hall (湖广会馆 Húguǎng Huìguǎn): Enjoy Sichuan opera performances and traditional arts. Three Gorges Museum (重庆中国三峡博物馆 Chóngqìng Zhōngguó Sānxiá Bówùguǎn): Learn about the history and culture of the Three Gorges region. Chongqing Science and Technology Museum (重庆科技馆 Chóngqìng Kējìguǎn): Discover interactive exhibits on science and technology. Chongqing Children`s Library (重庆市儿童图书馆 Chóngqìng Shì Értóng Túshūguǎn): Explore a wide range of children`s books and resources. Chongqing People`s Square (重庆人民广场 Chóngqìng Rénmín Guǎngchǎng): Enjoy outdoor activities and cultural events in this central square. Chongqing Grand Theater (重庆大剧院 Chóngqìng Dàjùyuàn): Attend performances and concerts in this modern theater. Chongqing Happy Valley (重庆欢乐谷 Chóngqìng Huānlègǔ): Amusement park with thrilling rides and entertainment. Chongqing People`s Park (重庆人民公园 Chóngqìng Rénmín Gōngyuán): Relax in green spaces and enjoy outdoor activities. Chongqing Zoo (重庆动物园 Chóngqìng Dòngwùyuán): Visit pandas, tigers, and other animals in this zoo. Huguang Guild Hall (湖广会馆 Húguǎng Huìguǎn): Enjoy Sichuan opera performances and traditional arts. Three Gorges Museum (重庆中国三峡博物馆 Chóngqìng Zhōngguó Sānxiá Bówùguǎn): Learn about the history and culture of the Three Gorges region. Chongqing Science and Technology Museum (重庆科技馆 Chóngqìng Kējìguǎn): Discover interactive exhibits on science and technology. Chongqing Children`s Library (重庆市儿童图书馆 Chóngqìng Shì Értóng Túshūguǎn): Explore a wide range of children`s books and resources. Chongqing People`s Square (重庆人民广场 Chóngqìng Rénmín Guǎngchǎng): Enjoy outdoor activities and cultural events in this central square. Chongqing Grand Theater (重庆大剧院 Chóngqìng Dàjùyuàn): Attend performances and concerts in this modern theater. Chongqing Happy Valley (重庆欢乐谷 Chóngqìng Huānlègǔ): Amusement park with thrilling rides and entertainment. Chongqing People`s Park (重庆人民公园 Chóngqìng Rénmín Gōngyuán): Relax in green spaces and enjoy outdoor activities. ChongQing: 30 More Places to Visit Ciqikou Ancient Town (磁器口古镇 Cíqìkǒu Gǔzhèn): Explore historic streets, shops, and teahouses in this ancient town. Chongqing Art Museum (重庆美术馆 Chóngqìng Měishùguǎn): Discover contemporary and traditional Chinese art in this museum. Chongqing Great Hall of the People (重庆人民大礼堂 Chóngqìng Rénmín Dàlǐtáng): Visit this iconic building for cultural performances and events. Chongqing Wulong Karst National Geology Park (重庆武隆喀斯特国家地质公园 Chóngqìng Wǔlóng Kāsītè Guójiā Dìzhì Gōngyuán): Explore karst landscapes, caves, and natural wonders. Chongqing Chaotianmen Square (重庆朝天门广场 Chóngqìng Cháotiānmén Guǎngchǎng): Enjoy views of the Yangtze and Jialing rivers from this square. Chongqing Hongya Cave (重庆洪崖洞 Chóngqìng Hóngyá Dòng): Explore traditional architecture, shops, and restaurants in this cave complex. Chongqing Ronghui Hot Springs (重庆融汇温泉 Chóngqìng Rónghuì Wēnquán): Relax in natural hot springs and enjoy spa treatments. Chongqing Jiefangbei Pedestrian Street (重庆解放碑步行街 Chóngqìng Jiěfàngbēi Bùxíng Jiē): Shop for souvenirs, snacks, and electronics on this bustling street. Chongqing International Expo Center (重庆国际博览中心 Chóngqìng Guójì Bólǎn Zhōngxīn): Attend exhibitions, trade shows, and events in this modern venue. Chongqing Eling Park (重庆鹅岭公园 Chóngqìng Élǐng Gōngyuán): Enjoy panoramic views of Chongqing from this hilltop park. Chongqing Nanshan Botanical Garden (重庆南山植物园 Chóngqìng Nánshān Zhíwùyuán): Explore diverse plant collections and enjoy outdoor activities. Chongqing Stilwell Museum (重庆史迪威博物馆 Chóngqìng Shǐdíwēi Bówùguǎn): Learn about General Stilwell and World War II history in this museum. Chongqing Yangtze River Cableway (重庆长江索道 Chóngqìng Chángjiāng Suǒdào): Enjoy panoramic views of the Yangtze River from this cable car. Chongqing Railway Museum (重庆铁路博物馆 Chóngqìng Tiělù Bówùguǎn): Explore the history of railways in China at this museum. Chongqing Wansheng Black Valley (重庆万盛黑山谷 Chóngqìng Wànshèng Hēishān Gǔ): Discover scenic landscapes and outdoor activities in this valley. Chongqing Guanyin Bridge Pedestrian Street (重庆观音桥步行街 Chóngqìng Guānyīnqiáo Bùxíng Jiē): Shop for fashion, accessories, and souvenirs on this pedestrian street. Chongqing Wanzhou Pagoda (重庆万州白鹤塔 Chóngqìng Wànzhōu Báihè Tǎ): Visit this historic pagoda for panoramic views of the city. Chongqing Diaoyu Fortress (重庆钓鱼城 Chóngqìng Diàoyú Chéng): Explore ancient military fortifications and enjoy scenic views. Chongqing White Crane Forest Park (重庆白鹤林公园 Chóngqìng Báihè Lín Gōngyuán): Enjoy nature trails, wildlife, and birdwatching in this park. Chongqing Railway Museum (重庆铁路博物馆 Chóngqìng Tiělù Bówùguǎn): Explore the history of railways in China at this museum. Furong Cave (芙蓉洞 Fúróng Dòng): Discover stunning stalactites and stalagmites in this natural cave outside Chongqing. Qutang Gorge (瞿塘峡 Qútáng Xiá): Cruise through this scenic gorge on the Yangtze River.
Pandas at the Research / Visitor Center in ChengDu 成都
The `PandaBase`, SiChuan province.
Beautiful scenes at JiuZhaiGou 九寨沟 valley, SiChuan province
Cyan lakes, wonderful waterfalls and verdant forests ...
Beautiful Mount EMei (EMeiShan 峨眉山) from the air
The first Buddhist temple in China was constructed here in SiChuan province in the 1st century A.D. The addition of other temples has turned Éméi Shān into one of Buddhism`s holiest sites and is one of the four sacred Buddhist mountains of China. All in all, there are now seventy six Buddhist temples and monasteries, most of them located near the mountain top. The first two films focus on the most well-known - the Golden Summit and the 48 meters tall statue of Samantabhadra, known in Mandarin as PǔXián PúSà 普賢菩薩.
The LeShan 乐山 Giant Buddha
The world`s largest ancient statue. Near LeShan city in SiChuan province.


GuangXi 广西 & GuiZhou 贵州 : GuiLin, YangShuo, HuangGuoShu videos



ZheJiang 浙江 : HangZhou, NingBo, WuZhen videos

Beautiful scenes from the show ‘Impression West Lake’ 印象西湖
The beautiful outdoor show in HangZhou, ZheJiang province ...
A weekend in HangZhou
ZheJiang province. With Ben Coleman ... And SuZhou, JiangSu province ... Bonus films - drone tech in ShenZhen, GuangDong province ... - Japanese living in China ... - `police state` - `freedom` vs safe life ... - progress and the people as family vs little progress and the people as livestock ...
A day at the West Lake 西湖 in HangZhou 杭州
A beautiful place for sightseeing, hiking, cycling, boating and relaxing ... HangZhou is the provincial capital of ZheJiang province in eastern China. It lies around 180 kilometres (110 miles) southwest of Shanghai. The beautiful West Lake is its best-known tourist attraction.


JiangSu 江苏 : SuZhou, NanJing, ZhouZhuang videos



ShaanXi 陕西 : Xi'An, Terracotta Warriors, HuaShan videos

Xi’An food tour, ShaanXi province
With Blondie in China. Part 1 - all about `noodles` (more videos soon) ...
The beauty of the historical DaMing Palace 大明宫
The DaMing Palace (DaMing Gong, Palace of Great Brilliance) was the imperial palace complex of the Tang Dynasty, located in its capital Chang`An. It served as the royal residence of the Tang emperors for more than 220 years. Today, the DaMing Palace site is designated a National Heritage Site of China, located a little north east of present-day Xi`An city center, ShaanXi province, central China. One can take subway line 2 to DaMingGongXi (DaMing Palace West) station. The palace complex was destroyed at the end of the Tang dynasty. The ruins were only discovered in the 1950s and some parts have now been reconstructed following careful archaeological analysis of the site. The reconstructions, museum and grounds opened to visitors in 2010. A beautiful film ...
A trip to Xi’An 西安


ShanXi 山西 : PingYao, YunGang Grottoes, WuTaiShan mountain videos

TaiYuan night walk, capital of ShanXi province
A trip through central and south China 中国
Including PingYao, Xi`An, GuiLin, the Dragon`s Backbone Rice Terraces, a Yao minority village, and the Li River ...
The ancient city of PingYao 平遥 in Ultra HD (4K)
PingYao (平遥) is a county in ShanXi province, central China. PingYao is located approximately 700 kilometres (400 miles) southwest of Beijing and 80 kilometres (50 miles) from the provincial capital TaiYuan. PingYao is an exceptionally well-preserved example of a traditional Han Chinese city, founded in the 14th century. This ancient city, which is renowned for its well-preserved city walls and outlying temples, is a UNESCO World Heritage Site.


HaiNan 海南 : SanYa, HaiKou videos

‘Our first month in HaiNan 海南 (paradise)’ …
Studying in HaiKou 海口, the capital of the island province.
A stay in tropical SanYa 三亚, HaiNan 海南 island
Filmed in 2007
SanYa, HaiNan island 三亚海南岛
The most southerly part of China, HaiNan is warm all year with a more or less tropical climate.


HeBei 河北 & ShanDong 山东 : QingDao, ShanHaiGuan, TaiShan videos

QingDao 青岛 Travelogue, ShanDong province
Explore the vibrant city of QīngDǎo with CCTV`s Travelogue ...
Scenic QingDao
With Walk East ...
Mount Tai 泰山 in ShanDong province
Mount Tai is one of China`s Five Sacred Mountains and has been a place of worship for at least 3,000 years. Mount Tai (or TaiShan, though there is a city called TaiShan in GuangDong - a different place) is a mountain of both historical and cultural significance which is located north of the city of Tai`An in ShanDong province. The tallest peak is the Jade Emperor Peak which reaches a height of 1,533 meters (just over 5,000 ft). In total, there are 22 temples, 100 ruins, 820 stone tablets, and over 1,000 cliff-face and rock inscriptions, including the Wordless Stela that stands in front of the Jade Emperor Temple. Legend tells that the emperor who commissioned the stela was dissatisfied with the planned inscription and decided to leave it blank. It is a UNESCO World Heritage Site.


GanSu 甘肃 and NingXia 宁夏 : JiaYuGuan, DunHuang, YinChuan videos

Chaka Salt Lake, QingHai
With Walk East ... Bonus film - the Singing Sand Dunes of GanSu ...
Two months in China’s south west 中国
Highlights of an eight week trip though Tibet, YunNan, SiChuan, GanSu and QingHai provinces (2007).
JiaYuGuan Pass at the western end of the Great Wall of China
With Walk East - the Great Wall of China. JiaYu Pass is not only the western starting point of the Ming Great Wall, but also a vital pass on the ancient Silk Road. It`s the joining place of the cultures of the Silk Road ...


HuNan 湖南 and HuBei 湖北 : WuLingYuan, ZhangJiaJie, FengHuang videos

A trip to beautiful ZhangJiaJie 张家界
ZhangJiaJie National Forest Park lies about 270 kilometers (170 miles) to the north-west of ChangSha, the capital of HuNan Province. Part of WuLingYuan 武陵源 Scenic Area.
XiangYang city, HuBei province
One of China`s most complete ancient cities, it was formerly named XiangFan. With Walk East ...
ChangSha night drive, HuNan province
`I want to take you on a tour of the night view of Changsha City. The city`s nights are very lively, with streets brightly lit even at 2 a.m. We start our journey from the famous tourist attraction, the Orange Island Bridge, where the winds are strong and the lights of the buildings are beautiful and well-organized. The carefully designed lights create a unified and futuristic atmosphere. We then visit Wanda Plaza and the Golden Eagle International Shopping Center, where the towering buildings are particularly spectacular at night. Finally, we arrive at the pedestrian street on HuangXing Road, where the commercial area is exceptionally lively.` With CN Walking ...


AnHui 安徽 : HuangShan, HongCun videos



JiangXi 江西 and FuJian 福建 : XiaMen, WuYiShan, JingDeZhen videos

SanQing Mountain 三清山, JiangXi province
SanQingShan is a renowned Taoist sacred site located 25 miles (40 km) north of YuShan County in JiangXi Province. With outstanding natural scenery, plants and wildlife, the park is a UNESCO World Heritage Site that in all covers 230 square kilometers. SanQing means the “Three Pure Ones” in Chinese as Mount SanQing is composed of three main summits: YuJing, YuShui, and YuHua, representing the Taoist trinity. YuJing (rising 1820 meters above sea level) is the highest. 三峰峻拔、如三清列坐其巅 SanQing Mountain in Jiangxi Province, although not very well-known to many people today, was regarded as a sacred place for Taoists in the Tang Dynasty period (618-907), when Taoism was at its most popular. With beautiful clouds, mist and strange-shaped pine trees, Sanqing Mountain is a fairyland far from the hustle and bustle of city life. The mountain is shrouded in mist for about 200 days each year. On misty days, dense fog envelops the mountain completely and makes you think you are wandering in the clouds. Once in a while, wind blows away the mist, and a stiff, imposing peak suddenly appears right in front of you. http://www.sanqing.com/english/
Night walk in one of China’s most beautiful mountain villages – HuangLing’s Hui-style houses, WuYuan, JiangXi 江西婺源
With Walk East ... Bonus film - ZhuHai walking tour, GuangDong 广东珠海 ...
Discover FuJian 福建 province …
On the south east coast of China, with ZheJiang to the north and GuangDong to the south. In part, FuJian is famous for its tea and lychee fruit. The largest cities include FuZhou (the capital) and XiaMen. Hakka, a Han Chinese people but with their own distinct identity, live in the southern parts of the province. The Hakka are most associated with their unique TuLou - large, round, communal dwellings.


HeNan 河南 : ShaoLin Temple, LongMen Grottoes, ZhengZhou videos

Aerial view of the beautiful LaoJunShan Mountain 老君山
Near LuoYang, provincial capital of HeNan, central China. There is a LaoZi Cultural Park near the foot of the mountain and a cable car is available to reach the top. The ancient sage LaoZi (in modern PinYin though one will still also see Lao-Tse or Lao-Tzu) who started Daoism (Taoism) and authored the Dao De Jing (Tao Te Ching), is said to have gained inspiration here around 550 BC. The Dao (道) which roughly translates as `the way`, in the sense of how things are, is a concept that existed in Chinese thought many centuries before LaoZi, but it was LaoZi who developed the concept considerably. Wu Wei (無爲), literally `non-action` or `not acting`, is a central concept of the DaoDeJing. The concept of wu wei is multi-faceted, and reflected in the words` multiple meanings, even in English translation; it can mean `not doing anything`, `not forcing`, `not acting` in the theatrical sense, `creating nothingness`, `acting spontaneously`, and `flowing with the moment / `here and now``. It is a concept used to explain ZiRan (自然), or harmony with the Dao. LaoZi used the term broadly with simplicity and humility as key virtues, often in contrast to selfish action. On a political level, it means avoiding such circumstances as war, harsh laws and heavy taxes. The `ruler` can also refer to the `self`. There is an overlap here with the Buddha`s teachings that suffering stems from attachments and desires, ultimately to the notion of a separate self. In Chinese philosophy, Yin and Yang (陰陽 YīnYáng, `dark—light`) describes how opposite or contrary forces are actually complementary, interconnected, and interdependent in the natural world, and how they give rise to each other as they interrelate to one another. While duality is found in many belief systems, Yin and Yang are parts of a Oneness that is also equated with the Dao. Yin and yang can be thought of as complementary (rather than opposing) forces that interact to form a dynamic system in which the whole is greater than the assembled parts; it is a holistic view. Everything has both yin and yang aspects, though either of the two major aspects may manifest more strongly in a particular object, depending on the criterion of the observation. Yin and Yang is a balance between two seeming opposites with a portion of the opposite element in each. Some of LaoZi`s famous sayings include: `When goodness is lost, it is replaced by morality.` `Without Darkness, there can be no Light.` `The usefulness of a pot comes from its emptiness.` `The best people are like water, which benefits all things and does not compete with them. It stays in lowly places that others reject. This is why it is so similar to the Way.` `When people see some things as beautiful, other things become ugly. When people see some things as good, other things become bad.` `Try to change it and you will ruin it. Try to hold it and you will lose it.` `Those who know do not say. Those who say do not know.` `When you realize there is nothing lacking, the whole world belongs to you.` `Nature does not hurry, yet everything is accomplished.` `A good traveler has no fixed plans, and is not intent on arriving.` `Music in the soul can be heard by the universe.` `A journey of a thousand miles starts under one`s feet.` `The more that laws and regulations are given prominence, the more thieves there will be.` Alan Watts - `The Daoist Way` ...
PingDingShan 平顶山, HeNan province
Including Mount ShiRen.
ZhengZhou 郑州, HeNan province
One of the `Eight Great Ancient Capitals` of China. Great music in this beautiful film ...


West China : Tibet 西藏, QingHai 青海, XinJiang 新疆 videos

The ‘Uyghur Tribunal’ : predictable and dangerous propaganda
Brian Berletic : `It is no coincidence that the so-called `Uyghur Tribunal`s `final ruling` coincided with a dump of supposedly `leaked` documents and the US-led `diplomatic boycott` of the BeiJing 2022 Olympics. This is a massive propaganda campaign aimed at building hatred for China and justification for conflict with China.` Circus, lies, propaganda, theater, kangaroo court. Manufacturing consent. And the mainstream media play their role as war propagandists; a disgrace to the human race. With The New Atlas ...
Daniel Dumbrill talks with Max Blumenthal of Moderate Rebels – XinJiang and the US empire’s war drive
Important information on today`s geopolitics. Do not miss it. XinJiang and the US empire`s war drive ... More from the Moderate Rebels channel ... The `threat` is that of a good example. In China, the people are family. In the West, the people are merely livestock. In the West, it is government by and for the elite (though wrapped in the candyfloss of elections). The Military Industrial Complex plays a part, but the biggest part is the western elites` superiority complex - colonialism never went away, it just became more subtle (but no less brutal).
This is the real XinJiang
With YChina! ...


North China : LiaoNing 辽宁, HeiLongJiang 黑龙江, JiLin 吉林, Inner Mongolia 内蒙古 videos

Harbin 哈尔滨 winter trip
HeiLongJiang province in north east China. Lots to see and do ... life well below zero ...
ShenYang, capital of LiaoNing province
With Walk East ...
ChangBai Mountain 长白山
ChangBai Mountain, ChangBaiShan (`Ever White Mountain`), is located in the south east of JiLin province, on the border between China and North Korea. The mountain is actually a volcano, with a height of 2,744 meters (9,000 feet), the highest mountain in north east China. ChangBai Mountain TianChi is the deepest lake in China, which was formed after a massive eruption in the year 946 and is about 5 kilometers (3.1 miles) wide; technically, this is called a caldera. The origin of the name comes from the altitude - `The Lake of Heaven`. TianChi is surrounded by 16 mountains, which makes the lake just like a gorgeous emerald among them. The average temperature here is about −24 °C (−11 °F) in January, and 10 °C (50 °F) in July, remaining below freezing for eight months of the year. Great films by Sticker Travel ...

Music and dance videos

Beijing 北京 Swing !
Awesome feel-good dance video ... Locations: The Great Wall, the Summer Palace, the `Bird`s Nest` Beijing National Stadium, QianHai - HouHai, the Temple of Heaven, ZhongShan Park and The Place mall. Music:the fantastic Pink Martini - `Wo Yao Ni De Ai  我要你的爱`  (I Want You, To Be My Baby) http://swingbeijing.com/
Yanni – China 中国 concert tour 2011 – behind the scenes
The popular composer / musician in GuangZhou, BeiJing and ChengDu ...
A selection of beautiful Buddhist songs / music
Buddha Said | Great Compassion Mantra | Sweep of our minds | Heart Sutra | Zen Charm | Prayer for the earthquake in Ya`An (2013). Enter the chill out zone ...
Spring Festival Chinese Opera party 春节戏曲晚会, 2016
Chinese Spring Festival flash mobs, 2019
ChengDu ... WuHan ... ShenZhen ... BeiJing ... XiaMen ... Ruyuan Yao Autonomous County, GuangDong ... ChangSha ...
Something different – relaxing chill-out jazz
No vocals or other emotional drivers; just calmness ...
 

Food videos

Chinese food made with the lotus
它出淤泥而不染,濯清漣而不妖,一池荷花,一桌菜 | 野小妹
When spring comes, let’s enjoy a pot of SiChuan dried ribs
春暖花开,来上一锅享誉巴蜀的盐排骨可好? ZiQi wrote the following when she released this video on Chinese social media on father`s day 2016 : I don`t have a signature dish. I just heard from grandma that you liked it. I don`t remember your face, but there`s always a silhouette in my head, and I know that it`s you. It hasn`t been easy without you by my side. It`s been twenty two years. I really miss you. Her father passed away when she was a young child. The background song is by an artist named 薛之谦 and is called 我好像在哪见过你 - I think I have met you somewhere ...
A bite of China – Chinese food !
The CCTV food series featuring food production, food culture, cooking and dishes. English narration. 1 Gifts of nature 2 The story of staple foods 3 Inspiration for change 4 The taste of time 5 Secrets of the kitchen 6 A perfect blend of five flavors 7 Our farm

Art, architecture and crafts videos

Restoring ancient pottery for the Palace Museum
Beautiful WuYuan, JiangXi province
WuYuan, known as the `most beautiful countryside in China`, with at least 50 old villages, is located in the northeast of JiangXi province, and near Mount HuangShan and JingDeZhen. With Walk East ... Max (Walk East) : Wuyuan is home to a few of the well-preserved ancient architecture in China. Each of those ancient structures has a unique appearance as well as structure. They emerge from among the emerald green mountains and trees, clear rivers along with the crisscrossing paths between the fields. Those structures were built in 740 during the Tang Dynasty; its remoteness and inconvenient transportation protecting its villages` beauty from a large amount of tourists. Local people there can enjoy the pure, clean brooks, seemingly delicate wooden buildings, unique bridges as well as the tranquil lifestyle, etc... This village has turned into a ecological, cultural as well as tourist demonstration center of China. The ancient Architectural complexes,caves, blue water, trees as well as rural sceneries; all these form a typical Chinese countryside scene Wuyuan has become a well known town in the world features in famous Huizhou local culture as well as charming idyllic scenery. Beijing Opera, Hui Opera, the Luo Dance known as the `Dance Live Fossil` as well as the charming tea performance, all these make Wuyuan fascinating tourism destination. 【Likeng Village】 Likeng Village is a cluster of houses constructed along a brook. It is said to be the most scenically beautiful village in the town. The brook is two to three meters wide spanned at different points by makeshift bridges. A rolling stream through the village lived by 260 peasant households along with ancient buildings with its pink walls, black tiles as well as beautiful girls who are washing laundry reflecting from the stream look like a natural scenery. 【Visit Local Ancient Village in Hui-style】 Wuyuan is the birthplace of the Huizhou culture. Villages around are must go, and you will be attracted by the quiet and simple countryside life there. noticeable Huizhou-style architecture can be found in these old villages, such as, arches, stone tablets, stone bridges, ancient stages, etc. Wuyuan is a county in northeastern Jiangxi province. It is renowned for its beautiful countryside and well-preserved ancient Huizhou villages and architecture. Many of the buildings and villages date from the Tang dynasty and have been protected by the county’s remoteness and relatively inconvenient transportation. Highlights and Travel Tips The area is famous for the fields of yellow rapeseed flowers that surround the villages in March and April, which are among the most beautiful in China and will delight photographers. One of the best places to see the flowers is hills surrounding the village of Jiangling. Popular villages and sights around the county include Likeng Village, Mount Dazhang (a beautiful area filled with soaring mountains and crashing waterfalls that is as yet undiscovered by tourism), Rainbow Bridge (a covered bridge), and Jiangling Village.
An introduction to 6,000 years of Chinese art
Illustrated by works from China at the Asian Art Museum of San Frascisco, one of the largest collections of Chinese art outside China.

Movie videos

About love …
11 / 11 - `Singles` Day`. Maybe being an inseparable 11 is the better way compared to 11 ? 2 (1). Maybe that other 1 is art, or all humanity. Whatever it is for you - live more ... Four great romantic short stories from SiChuan province, in south west China ... If you can, please help us out with a donation (see the top of the sidebar on the right)
Movie time – For Love or Money 露水红颜
Directed by Gao XiXi and starring Liu YiFei and Rain. A beautiful romantic film (15+) ...
Movie time – Let’s Get Married – a bitter/sweet romantic comedy

China is a vast and diverse country with a rich history, stunning landscapes, vibrant culture, and bustling cities. Here's a comprehensive travel overview for visitors:

Historical and Cultural Highlights:

The Great Wall of China: One of the most iconic landmarks in the world, the Great Wall stretches over thousands of kilometers and offers breathtaking views of the surrounding countryside.

Forbidden City (Palace Museum), Beijing: This ancient imperial palace complex is a UNESCO World Heritage Site, offering a glimpse into China's imperial past with its grand halls, courtyards, and gardens.

Terracotta Army, Xi'an: Discovered in the 1970s, the Terracotta Army is a collection of thousands of life-sized clay soldiers, horses, and chariots buried with the first Emperor of China, Qin Shi Huang.

The Bund, Shanghai: This waterfront promenade along the Huangpu River is lined with historic buildings, modern skyscrapers, and offers stunning views of the city skyline.

Potala Palace, Lhasa: Located in Tibet, the Potala Palace is a symbol of Tibetan Buddhism and the former residence of the Dalai Lama. It's renowned for its stunning architecture, intricate artwork, and sacred relics.

Natural Wonders:

Yangshuo and Guilin: Famous for their picturesque karst landscapes, these regions offer stunning scenery with limestone peaks, crystal-clear rivers, and traditional villages.

Zhangjiajie National Forest Park: Known for its towering sandstone pillars, this UNESCO World Heritage Site served as inspiration for the floating mountains in the movie "Avatar."

Jiuzhaigou Valley: A UNESCO World Heritage Site, Jiuzhaigou is famous for its colorful lakes, waterfalls, and snow-capped peaks, offering breathtaking natural beauty year-round.

Modern Marvels:

Infrastructure: China has the best high-speed rail network, subway systems and road system.

Shanghai Tower: This skyscraper in Shanghai is one of the tallest buildings in the world and offers panoramic views of the city from its observation deck.

Beijing Olympic Park: Visit the site of the 2008 Summer Olympics, including the iconic Bird's Nest Stadium and the Water Cube, now repurposed as a water park.

Culinary Delights:

Peking Duck: A famous dish from Beijing, Peking Duck features crispy duck skin served with thin pancakes, spring onions, and hoisin sauce.

Dim Sum: Originating from Guangdong province, dim sum consists of bite-sized portions of various dishes served in bamboo steamers, such as dumplings, buns, and rolls.

Practical Tips:

Visa: Most visitors to China require a visa. Make sure to check the visa requirements for your country before traveling.

Transportation: China has an extensive transportation network, including high-speed trains, domestic flights, buses, and subways. Apps like WeChat and DiDi are useful for navigating cities and ordering taxis.

Language: Mandarin Chinese is the official language, but English is not widely spoken outside of major cities and tourist areas. It's helpful to learn a few basic phrases or carry a translation app.

Currency: The currency in China is the Chinese Yuan (CNY or RMB). Credit/debit cards are widely accepted in urban areas, and at ATMs, but it is advisable to carry cash for smaller purchases and in rural areas. For longer visits, consider AliPay or WeChat for mobile payments.

China offers a wealth of experiences for visitors, from ancient wonders and cultural treasures to modern marvels and culinary delights. Whether you're exploring historic landmarks, immersing yourself in natural beauty, or savoring the diverse cuisine, China has something to offer travelers of all interests.

Accommodation Options:

Hotels: China offers a wide range of hotels to suit every budget, from luxury international chains to budget-friendly options and boutique accommodations. Major cities like Beijing, Shanghai, and Guangzhou have numerous hotel options catering to different preferences.

Hostels: Hostels are a popular choice for budget travelers, especially in cities with a thriving backpacker scene like Beijing, Xi'an, and Chengdu. They offer affordable dormitory beds as well as private rooms and often provide communal spaces for socializing.

Guesthouses and Homestays: In rural areas and smaller towns, guesthouses and homestays provide an opportunity to experience local culture and hospitality. These accommodations range from simple rooms in family homes to cozy guesthouses in scenic locations.

Flights to and within China:

International Flights:

Major Airports: China is served by several major international airports, with the busiest ones being Beijing Capital International Airport (PEK), Shanghai Pudong International Airport (PVG), and Guangzhou Baiyun International Airport (CAN).

Airlines: Numerous international airlines operate flights to China from destinations around the world. Major carriers include Air China, China Eastern Airlines, China Southern Airlines, Cathay Pacific, Singapore Airlines, and Emirates, among others.

Popular Routes: Popular international routes to China include flights from major hubs such as London, New York, Los Angeles, Tokyo, Seoul, Singapore, and Sydney.

Visa Requirements: Visitors from many countries require a visa to enter China. It's important to check visa requirements and obtain the necessary documentation well in advance of your trip.

Domestic Flights:

Domestic Airlines: China has a well-developed domestic air travel network, with several airlines offering flights to destinations across the country. Major domestic carriers include Air China, China Eastern Airlines, China Southern Airlines, Hainan Airlines, and Spring Airlines.

Popular Domestic Routes: Popular domestic routes connect major cities such as Beijing, Shanghai, Guangzhou, Chengdu, and Xi'an. Flights between these cities are frequent and relatively affordable, making air travel a convenient option for exploring different regions of China.

High-Speed Trains vs. Flights: In addition to domestic flights, China has an extensive high-speed train network that connects major cities. When planning your travel within China, consider factors such as travel time, cost, and convenience when choosing between flights and trains.

Booking Flights: Flights within China can be booked directly through airline websites, online travel agencies, or through travel agents. It's advisable to book tickets in advance, especially during peak travel seasons and holidays.

Practical Tips:

Baggage Allowance: Check the baggage allowance and any restrictions imposed by the airline you're flying with, especially if you plan to travel with oversized luggage or sports equipment.

Airport Transportation: Major airports in China are well-connected to city centers by airport shuttle buses, taxis, and in some cities, metro lines. It's advisable to research transportation options in advance to ensure a smooth journey to and from the airport.

Flight Delays and Cancellations: Flight delays and cancellations can occur, especially during inclement weather or peak travel periods. Stay informed about your flight status and be prepared for potential changes to your travel plans.

By considering these factors and planning accordingly, you can make the most of your flight experience when traveling to and within China.

Why people love to visit China:

For a multitude of reasons, ranging from its rich history and culture to its breathtaking natural landscapes and delicious cuisine. Here are ten reasons why China is a popular destination for travelers:

Rich History and Culture: China boasts a civilization that dates back thousands of years, with a wealth of historical sites such as the Great Wall, the Forbidden City, and the Terracotta Army. Visitors can explore ancient temples, palaces, and traditional villages, gaining insight into China's fascinating history and culture.

Great Wall of China: One of the most iconic landmarks in the world, the Great Wall of China stretches thousands of kilometers across northern China. Visitors can hike along its majestic ramparts, marvel at its breathtaking views, and learn about its significance in Chinese history.

Modern Cities: China is home to dynamic and modern cities such as Beijing, Shanghai, and Hong Kong, where visitors can experience the pulse of contemporary China. From towering skyscrapers and bustling markets to vibrant nightlife and cutting-edge technology, these cities offer a glimpse into China's rapid development.

Scenic Landscapes: From the towering peaks of the Himalayas to the picturesque karst mountains of Guilin, China boasts an incredibly diverse range of landscapes. Visitors can explore stunning natural wonders such as the Yellow Mountains, Zhangjiajie National Forest Park, and Jiuzhaigou Valley, each offering its own unique beauty.

Culinary Delights: Chinese cuisine is renowned worldwide for its variety, flavor, and complexity. Whether it's dim sum in Guangzhou, Peking duck in Beijing, or hot pot in Sichuan, visitors can indulge in a diverse array of mouthwatering dishes that reflect the country's regional diversity and culinary heritage.

Traditional Arts and Performances: China has a rich tradition of performing arts, including Peking opera, Chinese acrobatics, and traditional music and dance. Visitors can attend performances at theaters and cultural venues across the country, experiencing the beauty and grace of these ancient art forms.

Shopping and Markets: China is a shopper's paradise, with bustling markets, modern malls, and vibrant street stalls offering everything from silk scarves and antiques to electronics and souvenirs. Visitors can haggle for bargains at markets such as Beijing's Silk Street, Shanghai's Yu Garden, and Guangzhou's Shangxiajiu Pedestrian Street.

Tea Culture: Tea plays an integral role in Chinese culture, and visitors can immerse themselves in the country's rich tea traditions. From the tea plantations of Hangzhou's Longjing Village to the tea houses of Chengdu's People's Park, travelers can sample a wide variety of teas and learn about the art of tea brewing and appreciation.

Festivals and Celebrations: China celebrates a variety of traditional festivals throughout the year, offering visitors the opportunity to experience the country's vibrant cultural heritage. From the colorful lantern festivals of Chinese New Year to the dragon boat races of the Dragon Boat Festival, these celebrations showcase China's rich customs and traditions.

Hospitality and Warmth of the People: Chinese people are known for their hospitality and warmth towards visitors. Whether it's sharing a meal with a local family, chatting with vendors at a street market, or receiving a warm welcome at a traditional guesthouse, travelers to China often appreciate the friendliness and kindness of the people they meet.

These are just a few reasons why people love to visit China. With its blend of ancient traditions and modern innovations, breathtaking landscapes, and diverse cultural experiences, China offers something for every type of traveler to enjoy.

But it doesn't stop there! Here are some additional reasons why people love to visit China:

Incredible Architectural Marvels: China is home to some of the world's most impressive architectural wonders, including the ancient city walls of Xi'an, the modern skyscrapers of Shanghai's Pudong district, and the futuristic Bird's Nest stadium in Beijing. Visitors can marvel at these engineering feats and witness the country's architectural evolution.

Panda Conservation: As the home of the giant panda, China offers opportunities for visitors to see these adorable creatures up close. Panda reserves such as the Chengdu Research Base of Giant Panda Breeding and the Wolong National Nature Reserve allow visitors to observe pandas in their natural habitat and learn about conservation efforts.

Traditional Chinese Medicine: China has a long history of traditional medicine, including acupuncture, herbal remedies, and tai chi. Visitors can explore traditional medicine markets, visit herbal medicine shops, and even experience treatments such as acupuncture and massage at specialized clinics.

Cultural Festivals: In addition to traditional festivals, China also hosts a variety of cultural events and celebrations throughout the year. These may include folk music and dance performances, art exhibitions, and international film festivals, providing visitors with opportunities to immerse themselves in Chinese culture.

Martial Arts: China is the birthplace of martial arts, and visitors can learn about various styles such as kung fu, tai chi, and qigong. Many martial arts schools across the country offer classes and workshops for visitors of all skill levels, allowing them to experience the discipline and philosophy behind these ancient practices.

Ancient Silk Road: China played a central role in the ancient Silk Road trade route, which connected East and West. Visitors can explore historic Silk Road cities such as Xi'an, Dunhuang, and Kashgar, where they can see well-preserved artifacts, visit ancient ruins, and learn about the exchange of goods and ideas that shaped civilizations.

Ethnic Diversity: China is home to 56 recognized ethnic groups, each with its own unique culture, language, and traditions. Visitors can explore ethnic minority regions such as Tibet, Xinjiang, and Yunnan, where they can experience traditional festivals, sample local cuisine, and learn about the customs and lifestyles of these diverse communities.

Natural Hot Springs: China has a wealth of natural hot springs scattered across the country, offering visitors a relaxing and rejuvenating experience. From luxurious spa resorts to rustic outdoor pools, there are hot spring destinations to suit every preference, providing a tranquil escape from the hustle and bustle of city life.

Dynamic Nightlife: China's major cities come alive at night with vibrant nightlife scenes, including bustling night markets, trendy bars and clubs, and colorful street food stalls. Visitors can experience the excitement of cities like Shanghai, Beijing, and Guangzhou after dark, exploring neon-lit streets and enjoying live music and entertainment.

Ease of Travel: With modern infrastructure, efficient transportation networks, and increasing tourism services, traveling in China has become more accessible and convenient for visitors from around the world. Whether by high-speed train, domestic flights, or well-developed road networks, getting around China is relatively easy, allowing visitors to explore its diverse attractions with ease.

These additional reasons highlight the depth and variety of experiences that await travelers in China, making it a truly captivating destination for exploration and discovery.

UNESCO World Heritage sites:

China is home to a significant number of UNESCO World Heritage sites, each offering unique cultural, historical, and natural significance. Here are some of the most notable UNESCO World Heritage sites in China:

The Great Wall: This iconic symbol of China is one of the most famous UNESCO World Heritage sites in the world. Stretching over 21,000 kilometers across northern China, the Great Wall is a remarkable feat of ancient engineering and a testament to China's rich history.

The Forbidden City, Beijing: Also known as the Imperial Palace, the Forbidden City is a vast complex of palaces, courtyards, and gardens that served as the imperial palace of the Ming and Qing dynasties. It is one of the best-preserved examples of traditional Chinese architecture and a UNESCO World Heritage site since 1987.

The Terracotta Army, Xi'an: Discovered in 1974, the Terracotta Army is a collection of thousands of life-sized terracotta sculptures depicting the armies of Qin Shi Huang, the first Emperor of China. This archaeological marvel is considered one of the greatest discoveries of the 20th century and has been a UNESCO World Heritage site since 1987.

The Mogao Caves, Dunhuang: Located along the ancient Silk Road, the Mogao Caves are a complex of Buddhist cave temples containing exquisite murals, sculptures, and artifacts spanning over a thousand years of Buddhist art. Designated as a UNESCO World Heritage site in 1987, the caves are considered one of the most important repositories of Buddhist art in the world.

The Potala Palace, Lhasa: Perched atop Marpo Ri hill in Lhasa, Tibet, the Potala Palace is a majestic fortress-like complex that served as the winter residence of the Dalai Lama. With its stunning architecture, intricate artwork, and religious significance, the Potala Palace was designated as a UNESCO World Heritage site in 1994.

The Summer Palace, Beijing: Built in the Qing dynasty as a royal retreat, the Summer Palace is a vast imperial garden complex featuring pavilions, temples, bridges, and a large artificial lake. It is renowned for its harmonious blend of natural beauty and architectural splendor and has been a UNESCO World Heritage site since 1998.

Mount Tai, Shandong Province: Mount Tai, also known as Taishan, is one of China's Five Great Mountains and has been a place of worship and pilgrimage for over 3,000 years. Designated as a UNESCO World Heritage site in 1987, Mount Tai is revered for its cultural, religious, and natural significance.

The Classical Gardens of Suzhou: Suzhou is famous for its exquisite classical gardens, which are masterpieces of Chinese garden design dating back to the 11th century. These gardens feature intricate landscaping, pavilions, water features, and rockeries, and have been designated as a UNESCO World Heritage site since 1997.

The Old Town of Lijiang, Yunnan Province: Lijiang's old town is a well-preserved example of a traditional Han Chinese city, with narrow cobblestone streets, wooden buildings, and traditional Naxi architecture. Designated as a UNESCO World Heritage site in 1997, the old town of Lijiang offers visitors a glimpse into China's rich cultural heritage.

The Fujian Tulou: Fujian Tulou are traditional earthen dwellings built by the Hakka and Minnan people in the mountainous regions of Fujian province. These unique communal residences are characterized by their circular or rectangular shapes and thick rammed-earth walls. Designated as a UNESCO World Heritage site in 2008, the Fujian Tulou are a testament to traditional Chinese architectural ingenuity and communal living.

These UNESCO World Heritage sites represent the rich cultural, historical, and natural heritage of China and are must-visit destinations for travelers seeking to explore the country's diverse and fascinating attractions.

Chinese culture

Chinese culture is one of the world's oldest and most influential, spanning thousands of years of history and encompassing diverse traditions, customs, beliefs, and practices. Here are some key aspects of Chinese culture:

Confucianism, Taoism, and Buddhism: These philosophical and religious traditions have profoundly influenced Chinese culture. Confucianism emphasizes moral values, social harmony, and filial piety, while Taoism promotes living in harmony with the Tao (the Way) and achieving balance in life. Buddhism, introduced to China from India, has also played a significant role in shaping Chinese spirituality and culture.

Family and Filial Piety: Family is highly valued in Chinese culture, and filial piety, the respect and obedience towards one's parents and elders, is a core virtue. Family gatherings, especially during festivals like Chinese New Year, are important occasions for strengthening familial bonds.

Language and Calligraphy: The Chinese language, with its intricate characters, is central to Chinese culture. Calligraphy, the art of writing Chinese characters with brush and ink, is not only a practical skill but also a revered form of artistic expression.

Cuisine: Chinese cuisine is celebrated worldwide for its diversity, flavors, and regional variations. Each of China's provinces boasts its own culinary specialties, influenced by factors such as geography, climate, and cultural heritage. Popular dishes include dumplings, noodles, Peking duck, and Sichuan hotpot.

Arts and Crafts: Chinese culture has a rich tradition of arts and crafts, including painting, pottery, porcelain, silk weaving, embroidery, and paper cutting. Traditional Chinese painting, often featuring landscapes, flowers, and birds, emphasizes harmony, balance, and simplicity.

Festivals and Celebrations: Chinese festivals are vibrant and colorful celebrations that reflect the country's cultural diversity and heritage. The most important festival is Chinese New Year (also known as the Spring Festival), which marks the beginning of the lunar new year and is celebrated with fireworks, dragon and lion dances, family reunions, and feasting.

Traditional Medicine and Martial Arts: Traditional Chinese medicine, including acupuncture, herbal remedies, and qigong (breathing exercises), is deeply rooted in Chinese culture and philosophy. Similarly, martial arts such as Tai Chi and Kung Fu are not just physical disciplines but also embody principles of health, spirituality, and self-defense.

Cultural Symbols: Chinese culture is rich in symbolism, with certain objects and motifs carrying specific meanings. For example, the dragon symbolizes power, strength, and good fortune, while the phoenix represents beauty, grace, and prosperity.

Overall, Chinese culture is characterized by its richness, diversity, and enduring traditions, which continue to shape the lives of people both within China and around the world.

Ancient Philosophy and Literature: Chinese culture has a deep tradition of philosophy and literature dating back thousands of years. Classic texts such as the "I Ching" (Book of Changes), "Dao De Jing" (Tao Te Ching), and the works of Confucius have had a profound impact not only in China but also on global thought.

Performing Arts: Traditional Chinese performing arts include various forms of opera, such as Peking Opera, Cantonese Opera, and Kunqu Opera, each characterized by elaborate costumes, stylized gestures, and unique vocal techniques. Traditional Chinese music, with instruments like the guzheng (zither), pipa (lute), and erhu (two-stringed fiddle), also holds a special place in Chinese culture.

Tea Culture: Tea holds significant cultural importance in China, where it is not only a popular beverage but also a symbol of hospitality, etiquette, and social harmony. Traditional tea ceremonies, such as the Gongfu tea ceremony, emphasize mindfulness, respect for nature, and the art of brewing and enjoying tea.

Lunar Calendar and Festivities: The Chinese lunar calendar, which is based on the cycles of the moon, is used to determine traditional holidays and festivals. Besides Chinese New Year, other important celebrations include the Lantern Festival, Qingming Festival (Tomb-Sweeping Day), Dragon Boat Festival, Mid-Autumn Festival (Mooncake Festival), and Double Ninth Festival.

Etiquette and Social Norms: Chinese culture places great emphasis on etiquette and social propriety. Concepts such as "saving face" (maintaining dignity and reputation), hierarchical relationships, and the importance of indirect communication are deeply ingrained in Chinese society.

Education and Scholarly Tradition: Education has always been highly valued in Chinese culture, and the pursuit of knowledge and scholarship is esteemed. The imperial examination system, which dates back to ancient times, was a rigorous system for selecting government officials based on their literary and intellectual abilities.

Modern Cultural Influences: In addition to its rich traditional heritage, Chinese culture continues to evolve and adapt to modern influences. The rapid development of technology, media, and globalization has led to the emergence of new cultural phenomena, trends, and forms of expression, contributing to China's dynamic cultural landscape.

These aspects, among others, contribute to the richness and complexity of Chinese culture, reflecting a civilization with a long history of innovation, creativity, and resilience.

China's geography

China is known for its diverse geography. Here are some key points about China's geography:

Size and Shape: China is the fourth largest country in the world by land area, covering approximately 9.6 million square kilometers. It stretches from the eastern coast of the Pacific Ocean to the western border with various Central Asian countries.

Mountains: China is characterized by several major mountain ranges, including the Himalayas in the southwest, the Tian Shan in the northwest, and the Kunlun Mountains in the west. Mount Everest, the world's highest peak, is located on the China-Nepal border.

Plateaus: The Tibetan Plateau, often referred to as the "Roof of the World," is located in southwestern China. It is the highest and largest plateau on Earth, with an average elevation exceeding 4,500 meters (14,800 feet).

Rivers: China is home to several major rivers, including the Yangtze (Chang Jiang), Yellow River (Huang He), Pearl River (Zhu Jiang), and Mekong River. These rivers play a significant role in China's agriculture, transportation, and economy.

Deserts: The Gobi Desert is situated in northern China, while the Taklamakan Desert is located in the northwest. These deserts are important geographical features, influencing weather patterns and serving as barriers to human movement.

Plains and Coastal Regions: China has extensive low-lying areas, particularly along its eastern and southeastern coasts. These regions are highly populated and are centers of economic activity, including major cities like Beijing, Shanghai, and Guangzhou.

Climate: China's climate varies widely due to its large size and diverse geography. The country experiences a range of climatic conditions, from arid and semi-arid climates in the northwest to humid subtropical climates in the southeast.

China's infrastructure

China's infrastructure is among the most extensive and rapidly developing in the world, reflecting the country's economic growth and urbanization. The Chinese government has made significant investments in transportation, energy, telecommunications, and other sectors to support economic development, improve living standards, and enhance connectivity both domestically and internationally. Here's an overview of China's infrastructure:

Transportation: High-Speed Rail (HSR): China boasts the world's largest high-speed rail network, with thousands of kilometers of track connecting major cities across the country. High-speed trains, capable of reaching speeds of up to 350 km/h (217 mph), offer a fast, efficient, and comfortable mode of transportation for millions of passengers daily.

Expressways and Highways: China has an extensive network of expressways and highways, facilitating the movement of goods and people across the country. Major highways like the Beijing-Shanghai Expressway and the Guangzhou-Shenzhen Expressway link key economic regions and urban centers.

Urban Transport: China's cities are served by modern urban transport systems, including subway/metro systems, buses, and taxis. Major cities like Beijing, Shanghai, and Shenzhen have extensive subway networks that provide convenient and affordable transportation for residents and visitors.

Ports and Shipping: China has some of the world's busiest and most advanced ports, including Shanghai, Ningbo-Zhoushan, and Shenzhen. These ports play a critical role in global trade, handling massive volumes of containerized cargo and facilitating maritime transportation along China's coast and international shipping routes.

Aviation: China has seen rapid growth in its aviation sector, with major airports in cities like Beijing, Shanghai, and Guangzhou serving as key hubs for domestic and international air travel. The country has also invested in the expansion and modernization of airports to accommodate increasing passenger numbers and air cargo traffic.

Energy and Utilities: Power Generation: China is the world's largest producer and consumer of electricity, with a diverse mix of energy sources including coal, hydroelectric, nuclear, wind, and solar power. The country has invested heavily in expanding its power generation capacity to meet growing demand and reduce reliance on fossil fuels.

Renewable Energy: China leads the world in renewable energy investment and deployment, with ambitious targets for expanding renewable energy capacity. The country is a global leader in wind and solar power, with vast wind farms and solar photovoltaic installations contributing to its clean energy transition.

Water Infrastructure: China has invested in the construction of dams, reservoirs, and water diversion projects to manage water resources, mitigate flooding, and provide water for irrigation, industry, and urban areas. Notable projects include the Three Gorges Dam on the Yangtze River and the South-to-North Water Diversion Project.

Telecommunications and Information Technology: Telecommunications: China has a vast and rapidly growing telecommunications network, with widespread coverage of mobile phone and internet services. Major telecom operators like China Mobile, China Unicom, and China Telecom provide voice, data, and internet services to millions of users across the country.

Internet Infrastructure: China is home to one of the world's largest and most active internet user populations. The country has invested in the development of internet infrastructure, including broadband networks, data centers, and internet exchange points, to support the rapid growth of online services, e-commerce, and digital innovation.

Urban Development: Smart Cities: China is investing in the development of smart cities, leveraging technology and data to improve urban management, infrastructure efficiency, and quality of life for residents. Pilot projects and initiatives are underway in cities like Hangzhou, Shenzhen, and Chengdu to deploy smart transportation, energy, and public services.

Urban Planning and Construction: China's rapid urbanization has led to the construction of new cities, residential developments, and infrastructure projects. Urban planning and construction efforts aim to create sustainable, livable cities with modern amenities, green spaces, and efficient transportation systems.

Challenges and Future Directions: While China's infrastructure has made impressive strides in recent decades, the country still faces challenges such as environmental sustainability, infrastructure quality and safety, and equitable access to services. The Chinese government continues to prioritize infrastructure development as a key driver of economic growth and social development, with ongoing investments in upgrading and expanding transportation networks, energy systems, and urban infrastructure. As China's economy evolves and urbanization continues, infrastructure development will remain a critical focus area for ensuring sustainable and inclusive growth in the years to come.

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