Diet and health / disease – made simple (your one page nutrition guide) – updated

10 word summary : eat real (natural / unprocessed) food; be active; relax; be kind / appreciate.

The 'low fat (low saturated fat) diet' has led to increased disease and early mortality.

Real food - including, eggs, meat and dairy was replaced by highly processed toxic foods such as margarine, 'vegetable' oils, and refined grains. A recipe for disaster.

Over the last 100 years, cancer went from rare to common; same with heart disease, diabetes, arthritis, poor eyesight and degenerative brain disorders (these are all symptoms, not really diseases). Especially from the 1950s / 60s. So why ?

In short, increasing amounts of processed foods; though pollution, tobacco and alcohol also played a part. In particular, the cause of the increased incidence of disease was the adoption of the 'low fat diet' dogma, that allowed cheap, but nasty, 'food' to be made from 'vegetable' oils, plus sugar and refined carbohydrates (and a large variety of additives, such as artificial sweeteners and preservatives).

The big two culprits are :

*** 1) 'vegetable' (seed and bean) oils - sunflower, canola / rapeseed, corn, etc. These oils are highly processed, very unstable (easily oxidise and degrade) and are pro-inflammatory (omega-6).

Note that extra virgin olive oil is not a vegetable oil, and is un-processed. Saturated fats are not a problem. Neither is cholesterol - so essential to life that every cell can make it; and if they didn't, we'd die. It is needed by the brain, for making vitamin D and other hormones, and much, much more.

The problem isn't too much fat; the problem is eating the wrong fats. Don't think 'low fat', think 'good fat'.

Good fats include fish oil / cod liver oil (choose a good one), EVOO, butter / ghee, coconut oil.

*** 2) sugar and refined carb.s - bread, cakes, biscuits, pastries, colas, fruit juices, etc. These easily overload metabolism leading to fatty liver, weight gain and many other disturbances. Even whole-grains are not a good source of nutrition and have anti-nutrients (vegetables are where to get fiber, not grains).

Sugar and refined carb.s are addictive - the more you eat, the more you want.

Real food is the answer.

Rather than managing symptoms, we need to fix the root problem.

Avoid processed foods, also known as fake 'foods'.

Real foods include non-starchy vegetables (arugula, broccoli sprouts, garlic, tomato, onion, ...), meat (not the preserved type) and wild fish, some whole fruit (berries, avocados), nuts, eggs, cream, kefir; sauerkraut; kimchi. Small amounts of rice and pasta and potato may be okay for some people. High potassium 'lo salt'. Herbs and spices. Tea and coffee (unsweetened). The more variety, the better.

The microbiome in the gut is a key to health, and it needs real food. Start the regeneration.

The liver, in particular, but all the digestive system, and ultimately every part of the body, hates highly processed foods. End the poison. Kefir and sauerkraut can help.

Carnivore ? Vegan ?

The important thing is to avoid processed 'food', especially sugar, refined carb.s and 'vegetable' oils. Yet going to either extreme is far from ideal. Healthy keto would be a good choice, and maybe semi-keto for some. Variety. Quality (grass-fed, organic, etc.).

Animal foods for high quality protein and good fats; vegetables for fiber and their many phytonutrients (and feeding the gut microbiome).

Vegetarian ? Don't rely on fake 'meats' and include eggs, butter and cheese; plus fermented veggies. If include high quality eggs daily, a vegetarian diet can work.

Time restricted eating (and no snacks or 'grazing') and fasting.

Intermittent fasting (time-restricted eating) gives your body a chance to repair, heal and clean house.

Breakfast is the easiest meal to skip. Also, try not to eat for a few hours before sleep.

At root, the point is to balance energy storage and building the body, with using that stored energy and repairing the body.

1) Try to have a minimum of twelve hours a day not eating (the longer the better); 2) eat real food, not processed food.

This is important for everyone, but especially for diabetes / pre-diabetes (and that's almost the majority now).

Vitamins and supplements ?

It depends on one's circumstances and the quality of one's food. Because of soil depletion, intensive farming and breeding, food can be lacking in nutrients these days. While food is the go to, one might consider fish oil if do not eat fatty fish, vitamin D in the winter, + vitamin K2, CoQ10, magnesium, NAC (N-Acetyl Cysteine), nutritional yeast (or at least a B-complex or B1), and if not eating these : green tea extract and garlic extract.

Dr.s and professors who make sense include :

Mark Hyman, Jason Fung, Sten Ekberg, William Li, Eric Berg, Robert Lustig, Rangan Chatterjee, Tim Spector.

Next big thing to take care of is stress, then moderate exercise, then good sleep.

And stay positive - stay alive - be grateful everyday for life, for all that is beautiful, all humanity, and all that can be. Take time to relax, to help others, to de-clutter one's mind.

.

Chinese cuisine is an intricate tapestry of flavors, techniques, and regional specialties that has evolved over thousands of years. From the fiery spices of Sichuan to the delicate dim sum of Cantonese cuisine, every region of China offers its own culinary delights. For visitors to China, exploring the diverse and dynamic world of Chinese food is an essential part of experiencing the country's rich cultural heritage. Here's a more extensive exploration of Chinese cuisine for visitors:

Regional Diversity:
Sichuan Cuisine: Hailing from the southwestern province of Sichuan, this cuisine is famed for its bold, spicy, and numbing flavors. Sichuan peppercorns, chili peppers, and aromatic spices are used liberally in dishes like Mapo Tofu, Dan Dan Noodles, and Sichuan Hot Pot, creating a symphony of flavors that tingles the taste buds.

Cantonese Cuisine: With its emphasis on fresh ingredients and delicate flavors, Cantonese cuisine is highly regarded for its seafood dishes, roasted meats, and dim sum. Steamed fish, Char Siu (barbecue pork), and Har Gow (shrimp dumplings) are just a few examples of the exquisite dishes that showcase Cantonese culinary mastery.

Shanghai Cuisine: Reflecting its coastal location and cosmopolitan history, Shanghai cuisine combines influences from Jiangsu, Zhejiang, and Anhui provinces. Sweet and Sour Mandarin Fish, Shanghai Soup Dumplings (Xiaolongbao), and Drunken Chicken are some of the signature dishes that highlight the diverse flavors and textures of this culinary tradition.

Beijing Cuisine: As the capital of China, Beijing boasts a rich culinary heritage deeply rooted in imperial traditions. Peking Duck, a dish with crispy skin and succulent meat served with pancakes and hoisin sauce, is a quintessential Beijing delicacy. Other notable dishes include Zhajiangmian (Beijing Noodles), Mongolian Hot Pot, and Beijing-style meat pies.

Hunan Cuisine: Known for its bold and aromatic flavors, Hunan cuisine features dishes that are spicy, sour, and intensely flavorful. Chairman Mao's Red-Braised Pork, Dong'an Chicken, and Steamed Fish Head with Chopped Chili exemplify the fiery and robust nature of Hunanese cooking, which makes ample use of chili peppers, garlic, and fermented ingredients.

Street Food and Snacks:
Jianbing: This savory Chinese crepe is a popular breakfast option, consisting of a thin pancake filled with eggs, scallions, cilantro, and various fillings such as crispy fried dough, pickled vegetables, or chili sauce.

Baozi: These steamed buns are filled with a variety of savory or sweet fillings, including pork, vegetables, or red bean paste. Baozi are a popular street food snack and can be found in teahouses, markets, and street stalls across China.

Roujiamo: Often referred to as Chinese Hamburgers, roujiamo features savory braised meat stuffed inside a flatbread, offering a hearty and flavorful snack that's perfect for on-the-go eating.

Dining Etiquette and Customs:
Family-Style Dining: Chinese meals are typically served family-style, with multiple dishes shared among diners seated around a table. It's customary to use chopsticks to pick up food from communal dishes and to serve elders before oneself.

Toasting and Ganbei: When dining with Chinese hosts, expect toasts (ganbei) with alcohol, usually baijiu (Chinese liquor). It's polite to reciprocate the toast and drink in moderation, but declining politely is acceptable if you don't drink alcohol.

Tea Culture: Tea is an integral part of Chinese dining culture, with a wide variety of teas available to complement different dishes. Green tea, oolong tea, and pu'er tea are among the most popular choices, and serving tea to guests is a sign of hospitality and respect.

Street Markets and Night Markets:
Wangfujing Snack Street, Beijing: Located near the Forbidden City, this bustling street market offers a wide variety of traditional snacks, street food, and local delicacies. Visitors can sample everything from scorpions on a stick to traditional Beijing snacks like Jianbing and Tanghulu (candied fruit skewers).

Shanghai Old Street, Shanghai: Nestled in the heart of the city's historic district, Shanghai Old Street is a bustling marketplace where visitors can explore narrow alleyways lined with traditional shops, street vendors, and food stalls. From steamed dumplings and stinky tofu to hand-pulled noodles and sugar-coated haws, there's something to satisfy every craving.

Dietary Considerations:
Vegetarian and Vegan Options: While Chinese cuisine traditionally features a wide range of meats and animal products, vegetarian and vegan options are becoming increasingly available, especially in larger cities and tourist destinations. Buddhist restaurants (????, ssh c?nt?ng) often offer meat-free versions of classic dishes, and plant-based ingredients like tofu, mushrooms, and seasonal vegetables are widely used in Chinese cooking.

Exploring the diverse and delicious world of Chinese cuisine is an essential part of any visit to China. From regional specialties and street food snacks to dining etiquette and cultural customs, the culinary landscape of China offers a rich tapestry of flavors, traditions, and experiences that are sure to delight and inspire visitors from around the world. Bon apptit!.

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