Videos about Buzzz, China

Nine million light years from the edge …

BeijingBuzzz is eight and a half today - so besides some ice-cream, balloons and jelly, a trip down memory lane ...

We are removing some older videos that just don't have the video quality we expect today (things have come a long way in those 9 1/2 years) but here's a couple from the archive (2008 / 2009) and that long ago day when it all began.

Fuzzy, as memories become, but good memories ...

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The Summer Palace 颐和园, BeiJing ~ a quick tour

The Summer Palace (YiHeYuan) in BeiJing.


Highlights of filming in October 2010.


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The CCTV Tower in BeiJing 北京

With two observation levels and a revolving restaurant.


A good time to visit is late afternoon, allowing you to view Beijing both in the day and night. Choose a clear day and note that it can be chilly at that height, especially if it is windy (though the second observation level is indoors).


Nearest subway station : GongZhuFen (line 1). On exit, walk north along the third ring for about 10-15 minutes. Alternatively, arrive at the Military Museum station (also line 1) and head north into YuYuanTan Park, then head westwards around the lake to the tower, which will be clearly visible.


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Green space by the east gate of Ditan Park, BeiJing 北京

Filmed in October 2010.


North side of the second ring road by YongHeGong.


Nearest subway station : YongHeGong (lines 2 and 5).


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Yuan Dynasty Dadu City Wall Park, BeiJing 北京

Filmed in October 2010.


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Art works from the BeiJing 北京 2008 Olympics

Art works in the Olympic Park, November 2010.

TuanJieHu Park, BeiJing 北京

Filmed in November 2010

ZhongShan Park, BeiJing 北京 - video

Filmed in October 2010.

TaoRanTing Park 陶然亭公园, BeiJing - video

WangFuJing 王福井, BeiJing - video

Filmed in October 2010.

Prince Gong's Mansion 恭王府, BeiJing

Filmed in November 2010.

Green space along the second ring road, BeiJing 北京

This delightful green space runs from JiShuiTan in the west to YongHeGong in the east. It runs along the south side of the north second ring road. Passing GuLouDaJie and AnDingMen.

The Imperial City Wall Park near WangFuJing, BeiJing 北京

Filmed in October 2010.

JianZi and Tai Chi near WangFuJing, BeiJing 北京 - video

Filmed at the end of September 2010.

The Drum and Bell Towers in BeiJing 北京

Filmed in October 2010.

The Garden of Harmonious Interests at the Summer Palace 颐和园, BeiJing

YíHéYuán, September 2010.

Autumn in QingNianHu Park, BeiJing 北京

Filmed in November 2010. Nearest subway stations : AnDingMen (nearest) or GuLouDaJie (line 2).

The Confucius Temple 孔庙 in BeiJing

The Temple of Confucius in Beijing (KongMiao) was where people could pay homage to Confucius during the Yuan Dynasty (1271-1368), Ming Dynasty (1368-1644) and Qing Dynasty (1644-1911) - and still today. The Temple of Confucius in Beijing was initially built in 1302 and additions were made during the Ming and Qing dynasties. It covers a total area of 22,000 square meters (5.4 acres). It is the second largest temple constructed for Confucius, ranking second only to the Temple of Confucius in QuFu, ShanDong Province, the hometown of Confucius. Today, the temple is a haven of tranquility with ancient cypress and juniper trees (one of the cypress trees is over 700 years old), halls, pavilions and stone steles. Take note of the green-tiled burner for silk and paper prayer offerings. The temple is connected with the Imperial College next door. Confucius was one of the greatest philosophers in ancient China, initially influenced by the philosophy of Lao Tzu, who advised a stable civil society based on self virtue and respect. The teachings of Confucius played a key role in imperial times and still play a part in Chinese culture today. Confucius was deeply concerned with how to cultivate good character, and then on the interaction of people in society. He felt it was important to lead by example and this influenced his interest in education, for which ethical development was the main goal. The influence of Taoism can be seen in Confucius' book 'Genuine Living', where he says, "Developing in accordance with one's own nature is called 'the way of self-realization'". Referring to his own way of learning, Confucius said "To hear much, select what is good and follow it" and "Study without thought is labor lost; thought without study is dangerous". Inside the temple one can see 198 stone tablets positioned on each side of the first courtyard, containing 51,624 names of scholars who had reached the rank of JinShi during the Yuan, Ming and Qing dynasties. A JinShi is a successful candidate in the highest imperial examinations. There are also 14 stone stele pavilions of the Ming and Qing dynasties that detail precious historical information from ancient China. In the adjoining Imperial College are 189 steles on which are chiseled the 'Thirteen Classics'. This great work was achieved by just one man, Jiang Heng, a senior scholar at the time of emperor KangXi. It took him 12 years to complete cutting the 630,000 characters. The nearest subway station is YongHeGong (lines 2 and 5). From the YongHeGong Lama Temple entrance (south from YongHeGong subway station), cross the street and go straight ahead (westwards) through the colourful gateway, along the tree lined lane for a few hundred meters; the Confucius Temple will be on your right.

The Great Wall at BaDaLing 八达岭, BeiJing

The Great Wall of China is an immensely long man-made wall that was built to keep out invaders. The Great Wall spans nine provinces and its total length is 6,700 km (3,948 miles). The Great Wall extends from ShanHaiGuan (the 'Old Dragon Head'), a seaport along the coast of BoHai, in the east (near BeiDaiHe resort) to JiaYuGuan Pass in GanSu Province in the west. Like a giant dragon, the Great Wall of China winds its way across grasslands, deserts and mountains. Listed as a World Heritage Site by UNESCO in 1987, the Great Wall ('Chang Cheng' in Chinese) is a true marvel and a testament to the long history of the Chinese civilization. Today, people from all over the world visit to walk on the Great Wall of China, to stand on a watchtower and view the wall snaking into the distance. This treasure is now protected so that future generations can see the Great Wall with the same wonder and amazement as we do now. Some parts of the Great Wall have been overwhelmed by the elements. Some parts have been covered by the desert. Others eroded by local people recycling the wall's materials for constructions in their villages. Nevertheless, the Great Wall in large part still stands in silent splendor, enduring the passage of time and greeting the changes of the seasons as it has done for many hundreds of years.

The Forbidden City 紫禁城 (Palace Museum), BeiJing - video

The Forbidden City,at the center of the ancient city of Beijing, was home to 24 emperors during the Ming and Qing dynasties. Today, the Forbidden City is a public museum and World Heritage site, attracting millions of tourists from around the world. In the early 1400s, the third Ming Emperor, YongLe, moved the capital of China to Beijing. In 1406, he began construction of a new 'Forbidden City' that would include the imperial palace complex. It took 14 years to complete - and an estimated one million workers, and 100,000 artisans, were involved in some way. Now officially renamed as the 'Palace Museum' ('GuGong' in Chinese, meaning simply 'Old Palace'), the extensive grounds of the Forbidden City cover 720,000 square meters (74 Hectares). There are 800 buildings that have in total about 9,000 rooms. Indeed, the Forbidden City is listed by UNESCO as the largest collection of preserved ancient wooden structures in the world, and was declared a World Heritage Site in 1987. The Forbidden City is located directly to the north of Tian'AnMen Square and is accessible from the square via Tian'AnMen Gate. The Palace Museum is now a fantastic place to wander and dream of times gone by. White marble, walls of terra-cotta, roofs of glazed golden tiles, and woodwork finished with vermillion paint, lacquer and gilding unite to create an effect of outstanding beauty. Nearest subway stations: Tian'AnMen Xi or Tian'AnMen Dong (line 1).

Beautiful BeiHai Park 北海公园, BeiJing

BeiHai Park, in central Beijing close to the Forbidden City, is one of the oldest and most authentically preserved imperial gardens in China. BeiHai Park is an excellent living example of the ancient Chinese art of landscaped gardens with artificial hills, pavilions, halls, temples and covered corridors blended with trees, hills and the lake in a harmony of man and nature. Indeed, BeiHai Park is like a mini Summer Palace in the heart of Beijing. The white dagoba atop the hill on the island of the lake is one of the famous landmarks of Beijing. Don't miss : Passing through the temple up to the white dagoba Exploring the many other features dotted around the slopes of the hill Visiting the hidden gems on the north side of the park - the Peaceful Heart Studio with its ponds, pavilions and rock gardens, the Heavenly King Hall, the Nine Dragon Screen, DaCiRen Hall and the Pavilion of One Thousand Happinesses. Pictures 1 Pictures 2

LongTan Park 龙潭公园, BeiJing 北京

Longtan Park is located about 1.5 km east of the Temple of Heaven. Next to the west side of Longtan Park is the Beijing Amusement Park that features a ferris wheel and other rides. LongTan ('Dragon Pond') Park features the large Dragon Lake, with 'moon bridges', weeping willows, rock gardens, dragon boats, tea houses and restaurant, winding jogging track, exercise areas and play areas for children. There is also a beautifully curving pavilion with a dragon roof and pillars decorated with golden spiralled dragons. Indeed, the dragon motif is featured in many places throughout Longtan Park. This is a prime site for the Lantern Festival in Beijing when the whole park is illuminated with large colorful lanterns.

The Birds Nest Stadium and Olympic Green, BeiJing 北京

The Olympic Green is a huge site that includes the 'Birds Nest' national stadium and the 'Water Cube' aquatics center. Here was the main setting when Beijing hosted the highly regarded summer Olympics and Paralympics in 2008.

The Botanical Garden, BeiJing 北京植物园

Beijing Botanical Garden, close to XiangShan Park at the foot of the Western Fragrant Hills, was established in 1955. There are many features, including a lake, the Perennial Garden, Peony Garden, Ornamental Peach Garden, Orchid House, Desert Garden House, Exhibition Flower House and numerous gardens featuring camellias, bamboo, tree peonies, ornamental cherries and many others. There is also a memorial garden for Cao Xue Qin, famous for writing the literary classic 'Story of the Stone'. Don't miss: The 10,000 square meter conservatory. The sunken rose garden with large musical fountains. The WoFoSi ('Sleeping Buddha') Temple and the teahouse to the west and north of it (towards the mountain).

PanJiaYuan 潘家园 market, BeiJing

A huge and lively semi-outdoor market with something for everyone. If you only go to a market once in Beijing, take a trip to this colorful outdoor bazaar that sells all kinds of antiques, arts and crafts. It is located in south west Beijing, just east of LongTan Park. Although open everyday, it is most lively at weekends when far more stalls are open. Nearly the whole range of desired objects can be found here : jade, Tibetan and other ethnic crafts, books, artworks, communist memorabilia, coins, jewelry, statues, beads, silk, porcelain, musical instruments, furniture ... Not all the antiques are genuine so if you need certainty it is probably best to shop elsewhere. If you're just looking for a curio, this is a great place to go. If you want a bargain, remember to bargain! It was once called 'Ghost Market', which essentially meant black market. As word spread, people from far and wide would come here to sell what they could in times of need and by around 1990 the narrow hutong lanes were so crowded at the weekends that traders spread to a small nearby wood and sold their wares among the trees. This was when it gained the name 'Dirt Market'. So popular was the market that the authorities eventually legalised it, built a market structure and now rent out spaces within it. Don't miss: the giant statues that are to be found on the right hand side (if standing at the entrance looking in).

QianMen, BeiJing 北京

QianMen, literally 'Front Gate', once served as the outer entrance to the Imperial Palace (Forbidden City). In particular ZhengYangMen, 'Gate of True Sun', the grand stone gateway that was once part of the city wall around the inner city. On the outside of this gate, the QianMen area was traditionally focused on retail and entertainment. Just south of ZhengYangMen lies JianLou, 'Archery Tower' or 'Arrow Tower'. Rebuilt in 2007 in late Qing style, the pedestrianized QianMen Street is once again a lively place. The famous Lao She TeaHouse, with Chinese style cabaret in the evenings is nearby. QianMen lies immediately south of TianAnMen Square. The nearest subway station is QianMen (line 2).

The ruins of the Western-style palaces at YuanMingYuan 圆明园, BeiJing

YuanMingYuan, also known as the 'Old Summer Palace', was constructed during the 18th and early 19th century and was a wonderland of lakes and waterways, bridges, hills and pavilions. One third of the ground of YuanMingYuan was taken up by over 200 small hills with steep sides, secluded valleys, rock walls and stone caves. Half of the garderns are covered by the waters of lakes, winding streams and ponds. It was at YuanMingYuan that the emperors of the Qing Dynasty resided and handled government affairs - until it was destroyed; the Forbidden City was mostly used only for formal ceremonies at this time. The southern part of YuanMingYuan was where emperors handled state affairs, while the other parts were primarily for personal use and comprised of more than 150 scenic spots, involving rare exotic flowers and trees from different parts of the country. There were originally towers, terraces, pavilions, halls, corridors, pagodas and bridges with a total construction area of 150,000 square meters - corresponding in scale to that of the Imperial Palace. Artisans were recruited from all over China to enact the exquisite settings. The various styles of architecture, standing encircled by hills and rivulets, presented a most picturesque view. Many were reproductions of scenic mountains, rivers and famous gardens in China (mostly southern China). During his many tours of the country, emperor QianLong made it a point to have pictures of famous gardens and scenes drawn so that he could have replicas built in Beijing. Most famous of these were the ten scenic spots of the West Lake in HangZhou. The Old Summer Palace is often associated with the European-style palaces (Xi Yang Lou) that were built of stone. The designers of those structures, the Jesuits Giuseppe Castiglione and Michel Benoist, were employed by emperor QianLong to satisfy his taste for exotic buildings and objects. However, more than 95% of the Imperial Gardens consisted of essentially Chinese-style buildings. There were also a few buildings in Tibetan and Mongolian styles, reflecting the diversity of the Qing empire. In addition, hundreds of invaluable Chinese art masterpieces and antiquities were stored in the halls, including some unique copies of literary works and collections. In 1860, during the 'Second Opium War', the British and French expeditionary forces looted the Old Summer Palace. Later, on October 18 1860, a British general - despite protestations from the French (who in fact had began the looting) - gave the order to set fire to the huge complex, which burned to the ground. In 1900, those buildings that had partly survived or been restored were burnt for good by the Western expeditionary forces sent to quell the 'Boxer Rebellion'. Many priceless artifacts were plundered and made their way to museums and private collections in Europe. The ruins were further plundered by the warlords of the early republican period and further destruction of the ruins took place during the 'Cutural Revolution'. After all this destruction, what was left was truely just an empty shell. Empress dowager CiXi later directed the forming of YiHeYuan (Garden of Nurtured Harmony), into a new Summer Palace; this was near to the Old Summer Palace, but on a (somewhat) smaller scale. Nearest subway station : YuanMingYuan on line 4.

DiTan Park 地毯公园, BeiJing

DiTan Park is based around the Temple of Earth and complements the Temple of Heaven (TianTan) in the south of BeiJing. Besides the temple and altar, the park is filled with pine, gingko and cypress trees. There is an exercise area and children's play area towards the North Gate, a large croquet green to the south of the East Gate, and landscaped pavilions to the north of the East Gate. There is a very popular Temple Fair held here during the Spring Festival which falls around the beginning of February. Nearest subway stations: YongHeGong (lines 2 and 5) for the East Gate (nearest) or AnDingMen (line 2) for the West Gate. The green space outside the East Gate is also very pleasant.

Diabolo in TuanJieHu Park 团结湖公园, BeiJing - video

Filmed in October 2010.

Ribbon dancing in JingShan Park, BeiJing 北京

Filmed in October 2010.

Boating on BeiHai Park 北海公园 lake, BeiJing - video

Filmed in October 2010.

BeiHai Park, BeiJing 北京, a panorama

Filmed in October 2010. Standing at the north end of the western shore of the lake by the Five Dragon Pavilions.

Long Corridor pictures at the Summer Palace, BeiJing 北京

Filmed at the Garden of Harmonious Interests within the Summer Palace, Beijing. A short stretch of the Long Corridor ...

Sunset boating in BeiHai Park 北海公园, BeiJing

Filmed in October 2010.

JianZi at LongTan Park, BeiJing 北京

The first video is at half-speed.

Sunset at the Summer Palace 颐和园, BeiJing - video

Filmed during October 2010.

XuanWu Park 宣武公园, BeiJing 北京

The small(ish) and little-known but perfectly-formed park in south west Beijing.

Early morning at QianHai 前海 Lake, BeiJing

About 7am. QianHai is the lake between HouHai and BeiHai Park (across Di'AnMen street) and includes Lotus Lane along the south west side, with lake-side bars and dining. XiHai, HouHai and QianHai are collectively known as ShiChaHai. All three have interesting places to eat and drink, and are particularly popular at night. Between HouHai and QianHai lies the ancient JinDing bridge (JinDing Qiao); from the east side one can follow the interesting pedestrianised lane YanDaiXie Jie to the Drum and Bell Towers. Parallel to QianHai a little further east lies Nan LuoGuXiang.

XinJiang-style dance in BeiHai Park 北海公园, BeiJing

Filmed in October 2010.

YuanMingYuan 圆明园, BeiJing - video

YuanMingYuan, also known as the 'Old Summer Palace', was constructed during the 18th and early 19th century and was a wonderland of lakes and waterways, bridges, hills and pavilions. One third of the ground of YuanMingYuan was taken up by over 200 small hills with steep sides, secluded valleys, rock walls and stone caves. Half of the garderns are covered by the waters of lakes, winding streams and ponds. It was at YuanMingYuan that the emperors of the Qing Dynasty resided and handled government affairs - until it was destroyed; the Forbidden City was mostly used only for formal ceremonies at this time. The southern part of YuanMingYuan was where emperors handled state affairs, while the other parts were primarily for personal use and comprised of more than 150 scenic spots, involving rare exotic flowers and trees from different parts of the country. There were originally towers, terraces, pavilions, halls, corridors, pagodas and bridges with a total construction area of 150,000 square meters - corresponding in scale to that of the Imperial Palace. Artisans were recruited from all over China to enact the exquisite settings. The various styles of architecture, standing encircled by hills and rivulets, presented a most picturesque view. Many were reproductions of scenic mountains, rivers and famous gardens in China (mostly southern China). During his many tours of the country, emperor QianLong made it a point to have pictures of famous gardens and scenes drawn so that he could have replicas built in Beijing. Most famous of these were the ten scenic spots of the West Lake in HangZhou. The Old Summer Palace is often associated with the European-style palaces (Xi Yang Lou) that were built of stone. The designers of those structures, the Jesuits Giuseppe Castiglione and Michel Benoist, were employed by emperor QianLong to satisfy his taste for exotic buildings and objects. However, more than 95% of the Imperial Gardens consisted of essentially Chinese-style buildings. There were also a few buildings in Tibetan and Mongolian styles, reflecting the diversity of the Qing empire. In addition, hundreds of invaluable Chinese art masterpieces and antiquities were stored in the halls, including some unique copies of literary works and collections. In 1860, during the 'Second Opium War', the British and French expeditionary forces looted the Old Summer Palace. Later, on October 18 1860, a British general - despite protestations from the French (who in fact had began the looting) - gave the order to set fire to the huge complex, which burned to the ground. In 1900, those buildings that had partly survived or been restored were burnt for good by the Western expeditionary forces sent to quell the 'Boxer Rebellion'. Many priceless artifacts were plundered and made their way to museums and private collections in Europe. The ruins were further plundered by the warlords of the early republican period and further destruction of the ruins took place during the 'Cutural Revolution'. After all this destruction, what was left was truely just an empty shell. Empress dowager CiXi later directed the forming of YiHeYuan (Garden of Nurtured Harmony), into a new Summer Palace; this was near to the Old Summer Palace, but on a (somewhat) smaller scale. Nearest subway station : YuanMingYuan on line 4. Don't miss : Buying a large souvenir 'map' at the entrance showing the original gardens The ruins of the Western-style palaces FuHai Lake near sunset

Grand View Garden 大观园, BeiJing (slideshow)

Grand View Garden (DàGuānYuán) brings to life settings from the classic novel 'A Dream of Red Mansions' by Qing Dynasty writer Cao XueQin (17l5-l763). With a new vista at every turn, these gardens are filled with archetypal Chinese scenery : rocky hills and tunnels, bridges, courtyards, pavilions, a Buddhist temple, corridors and more, all set in a lush landscape with a lake, streams and trees. There is also a hotel and restaurant. The garden was originally constructed in the 1980s as the set for a long-running TV series.

LianHuaChi 莲花池 Park, BeiJing, slideshow

The 'Lotus Flower Pond' Park in BeiJing.

Autumn in LianHuaChi Park, BeiJing 北京

'Lotus Flower Pond' Park. Filmed in November 2010.

The main palace at the Summer Palace 颐和园, BeiJing

Including the Tower of Buddhist Incense and Cloud Dispelling Hall

SuZhou Market Street at the Summer Palace, BeiJing 北京

Filmed in October 2010.

BeiHai Park timelapse, BeiJing 北京

Filmed during the week-long 'National Day' holiday; October 2010.

The Summer Palace lake, BeiJing 北京

The beautiful KunMing Lake at YiHeYuan ...

The Summer Palace 頤和園, BeiJing - video

The Summer Palace is the largest and best-preserved imperial garden in China. As its name suggests, the Summer Palace was used as a summer residence by China's imperial rulers - as a retreat from the main imperial palace now known as the Palace Museum (or 'Forbidden City') - a pleasure-ground in the countryside, yet near to the city. In 1860, as part of the 'Opium Wars', the Anglo-French Allied Forces invaded Beijing and set fire to many of the buildings within the original Summer Palace (YuanMingYuan). In 1888, Dowager Empress CiXi, with funds embezzled from the Imperial Navy, restored the grand gardens. The reconstruction and enlargement of the Summer Palace continued for ten years. After completion, she renamed the gardens 'YiHeYuan' ('Garden of Peace and Harmony'). The Empress Dowager CiXi moved her administration to the renovated YiHeYuan in 1889 and the gardens here that had long been an imperial pleasure-ground became the primary Summer Palace. Then, shortly after, the eight allied powers invaded in 1900 during the Boxer Rebellion to plunder and destroy the newly reconstructed New Summer Palace. Only when the fugitive CiXi returned to Beijing in 1903, did full-scale restoration begin. In this way, the Summer Palaces - both old and new - are associated in popular culture with the destructive interference of foreign powers. Today's Summer Palace is more or less the same as the palace rebuilt from 1903. It was designated a World Heritage site by UNESCO in 1990. After the success of the 1911 Revolution, the Summer Palace was opened to the public. Then, after the last Qing Emperor PuYi was thrown out of the Palaces in 1924, the Summer Palace was turned into a park. The Summer Palace has become a popular and relaxing destination for both domestic and international tourists. The Summer Palace is virtually a museum of traditional Chinese gardening that uses rocks, plants, pavilions, ponds, cobble paths and other garden styles to create a poetic effect between different scenes. The halls, pavilions, bridges and temples, Kunming Lake and Longevity Hill, all blend together harmoniously despite their individual styles. Ingeniously conceived and elaborately designed, the Summer Palace, featuring the garden styles of both northern and southern China, is justifiably known as the 'Garden of Gardens'. Indeed, the Summer Palace represents a quintessentially Chinese ideal of harmony between man and nature. Don't miss : the beautiful Garden of Harmonious Interests (a 'garden within a garden'), SuZhou Street and the Four Great Regions Tibetan-style temple, and the Tower of Buddhist Incense and Cloud Dispelling Hall on the hill. The nearest subway station is BeiGongMen ('North Palace Gate') on line 4.

Sunset over the mountains, BeiJing 北京

At the Summer Palace in Beijing. Filmed in October 2010.

Temple of Heaven 天坛 timelapse films, BeiJing

Filmed in October 2010.

Panorama of the Temple of Heaven, BeiJing 北京

Filmed in October 2010.

The Temple of Heaven 天坛, Beijing (2)

The magnificent Temple of Heaven (TianTan) was constructed between 1406 and 1420 (Ming dynasty) during the reign of the emperor YongLe who also oversaw the construction of the Forbidden City.The Temple of Heaven was where emperors of the Ming and Qing dynasties would offer sacrifices to heaven and pray for good harvests. The temple complex was extended during the reign of emperor JiaJing during the 16th century (Ming dynasty). JiaJing also constructed three other key temples in Beijing : the Temple of the Sun in the east, the Temple of the Moon in the west, and the Temple of Earth in the north. Emperor QianLong directed a renovation of the Temple of Heaven during the 18th century (Qing dynasty). The architecture and layout of the Temple of Heaven is based on elaborate symbolism and numerology. One example is that the buildings and their settings reflect ancient Chinese religious beliefs that imagine heaven as round and earth as square. Because the Temple of Heaven was to be the place representing Heaven on Earth, it needed to be larger than the Forbidden City; it covers approximately twice the area and is about 2 kilometers from north to south, the primary axis with three main structures; indeed, it is the largest group of constructions for worship in the world. In 1998, the Temple of Heaven was added to the UNESCO World Heritage List. In early 2005, the Temple of Heaven underwent a 47 million yuan (6 million USD) renovation that was completed on May 1st, 2006. The Temple of Heaven is a delightful place to spend some time. Arrive in the early morning to watch the Tai Chi experts, although the park is lively all day and into the evening with kite flyers, musicians, singers, dancers and games players (from badminton to Chinese chess).

Stick tricks in JingShan Park, BeiJing 北京

Filmed in November 2010.

Dancing in JingShan Park 景山公园, BeiJing - video

Filmed in November 2010.

Ribbon dancing in JingShan Park, BeiJing 北京 (2)

Filmed in October 2010.

JianZi 毽子 in JingShan Park 景山公园, BeiJing

The popular game of JianZi. Similar to Hackey Sack (Foot Bag).

Panorama of Beijing 北京 from JingShan Park

North Beijing from the hill in JingShan Park ...

Tai Chi in JingShan Park, Beijing 北京

Filmed in October 2010.

The Forbidden City 紫禁城, BeiJing ~ seven scenes - video

Filmed in October 2010.

Boating through lotuses, BeiHai Park 北海公园, BeiJing - video

BěiHǎi GōngYuán. Lotuses are best July to September.

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