Evening, dinner-time walk in ShangHai

With Wei's Travel ...

[640],shadow=true,start=,stop=

Bonus film - with Walk East - Bund night walk, looking across the HuangPu river to PuDong ...

[320],shadow=true,start=,stop=

Bonus film 2 - with Gecko Walks - LuJiaZui ...

[320],shadow=true,start=,stop= [320],shadow=true,start=,stop=

Shanghai is one of China's most dynamic and cosmopolitan cities, blending a rich history with modern skyscrapers and vibrant culture. Here's what you need to know as a tourist visiting Shanghai:

Historical and Cultural Landmarks:
The Bund: This iconic waterfront promenade along the Huangpu River features colonial-era buildings on one side and futuristic skyscrapers on the other, offering stunning views of Shanghai's skyline.

Yu Garden: Dating back to the Ming dynasty, Yu Garden is a classical Chinese garden with pavilions, ponds, and rockeries. The nearby Yu Garden Bazaar is a great place to shop for souvenirs and traditional crafts.

Shanghai Museum: Home to an extensive collection of Chinese art and artifacts, including bronzes, ceramics, paintings, and calligraphy, the Shanghai Museum is a must-visit for history and art enthusiasts.

Jing'an Temple: One of Shanghai's most famous Buddhist temples, Jing'an Temple is known for its beautiful architecture, peaceful atmosphere, and towering golden Buddha statue.

Modern Attractions:
Shanghai Tower: Ascend to the observation deck of this iconic skyscraper, the tallest in China and the second-tallest in the world, for panoramic views of the city.

The Oriental Pearl TV Tower: Another iconic landmark, this futuristic tower offers observation decks, a glass-bottomed skywalk, and a revolving restaurant.

Shanghai Disneyland: Located in the Pudong district, Shanghai Disneyland offers a magical experience for visitors of all ages with its themed lands, attractions, and entertainment.

Shopping and Entertainment:
Nanjing Road: One of the world's busiest shopping streets, Nanjing Road is lined with department stores, boutiques, and restaurants. Don't miss the nearby pedestrian-friendly Nanjing Road East, known for its lively atmosphere and street performers.

Xintiandi: This upscale shopping, dining, and entertainment district features a mix of traditional Shikumen-style buildings and modern amenities, making it a popular destination for locals and tourists alike.

French Concession: Explore this historic neighborhood known for its tree-lined streets, charming cafes, boutiques, and art galleries.

Culinary Delights:
Shanghai Cuisine: Sample local specialties such as xiaolongbao (soup dumplings), shengjianbao (pan-fried dumplings), and Shanghai-style noodles.

Street Food: Wander through the city's bustling food markets and snack streets to taste a variety of street foods, from savory pancakes to grilled skewers.

Practical Tips:
Transportation: Shanghai has an efficient public transportation system, including the subway, buses, and taxis. Consider purchasing a rechargeable transportation card for convenience.

Language: While Mandarin is the official language, English is widely spoken in tourist areas, hotels, and restaurants.

Weather: Shanghai experiences four distinct seasons, with hot, humid summers and chilly winters. The best times to visit are spring (March to May) and autumn (September to November) when the weather is mild and comfortable.

Etiquette: Respect local customs and traditions, such as using polite language and avoiding loud behavior in public places.

Shanghai offers a captivating blend of old and new, with its historic landmarks, modern skyscrapers, vibrant culture, and delectable cuisine. Whether you're interested in history, architecture, shopping, or dining, Shanghai has something to offer every type of visitor.

Chinese cuisine is an intricate tapestry of flavors, techniques, and regional specialties that has evolved over thousands of years. From the fiery spices of Sichuan to the delicate dim sum of Cantonese cuisine, every region of China offers its own culinary delights. For visitors to China, exploring the diverse and dynamic world of Chinese food is an essential part of experiencing the country's rich cultural heritage. Here's a more extensive exploration of Chinese cuisine for visitors:

Regional Diversity:
Sichuan Cuisine: Hailing from the southwestern province of Sichuan, this cuisine is famed for its bold, spicy, and numbing flavors. Sichuan peppercorns, chili peppers, and aromatic spices are used liberally in dishes like Mapo Tofu, Dan Dan Noodles, and Sichuan Hot Pot, creating a symphony of flavors that tingles the taste buds.

Cantonese Cuisine: With its emphasis on fresh ingredients and delicate flavors, Cantonese cuisine is highly regarded for its seafood dishes, roasted meats, and dim sum. Steamed fish, Char Siu (barbecue pork), and Har Gow (shrimp dumplings) are just a few examples of the exquisite dishes that showcase Cantonese culinary mastery.

Shanghai Cuisine: Reflecting its coastal location and cosmopolitan history, Shanghai cuisine combines influences from Jiangsu, Zhejiang, and Anhui provinces. Sweet and Sour Mandarin Fish, Shanghai Soup Dumplings (Xiaolongbao), and Drunken Chicken are some of the signature dishes that highlight the diverse flavors and textures of this culinary tradition.

Beijing Cuisine: As the capital of China, Beijing boasts a rich culinary heritage deeply rooted in imperial traditions. Peking Duck, a dish with crispy skin and succulent meat served with pancakes and hoisin sauce, is a quintessential Beijing delicacy. Other notable dishes include Zhajiangmian (Beijing Noodles), Mongolian Hot Pot, and Beijing-style meat pies.

Hunan Cuisine: Known for its bold and aromatic flavors, Hunan cuisine features dishes that are spicy, sour, and intensely flavorful. Chairman Mao's Red-Braised Pork, Dong'an Chicken, and Steamed Fish Head with Chopped Chili exemplify the fiery and robust nature of Hunanese cooking, which makes ample use of chili peppers, garlic, and fermented ingredients.

Street Food and Snacks:
Jianbing: This savory Chinese crepe is a popular breakfast option, consisting of a thin pancake filled with eggs, scallions, cilantro, and various fillings such as crispy fried dough, pickled vegetables, or chili sauce.

Baozi: These steamed buns are filled with a variety of savory or sweet fillings, including pork, vegetables, or red bean paste. Baozi are a popular street food snack and can be found in teahouses, markets, and street stalls across China.

Roujiamo: Often referred to as Chinese Hamburgers, roujiamo features savory braised meat stuffed inside a flatbread, offering a hearty and flavorful snack that's perfect for on-the-go eating.

Dining Etiquette and Customs:
Family-Style Dining: Chinese meals are typically served family-style, with multiple dishes shared among diners seated around a table. It's customary to use chopsticks to pick up food from communal dishes and to serve elders before oneself.

Toasting and Ganbei: When dining with Chinese hosts, expect toasts (ganbei) with alcohol, usually baijiu (Chinese liquor). It's polite to reciprocate the toast and drink in moderation, but declining politely is acceptable if you don't drink alcohol.

Tea Culture: Tea is an integral part of Chinese dining culture, with a wide variety of teas available to complement different dishes. Green tea, oolong tea, and pu'er tea are among the most popular choices, and serving tea to guests is a sign of hospitality and respect.

Street Markets and Night Markets:
Wangfujing Snack Street, Beijing: Located near the Forbidden City, this bustling street market offers a wide variety of traditional snacks, street food, and local delicacies. Visitors can sample everything from scorpions on a stick to traditional Beijing snacks like Jianbing and Tanghulu (candied fruit skewers).

Shanghai Old Street, Shanghai: Nestled in the heart of the city's historic district, Shanghai Old Street is a bustling marketplace where visitors can explore narrow alleyways lined with traditional shops, street vendors, and food stalls. From steamed dumplings and stinky tofu to hand-pulled noodles and sugar-coated haws, there's something to satisfy every craving.

Dietary Considerations:
Vegetarian and Vegan Options: While Chinese cuisine traditionally features a wide range of meats and animal products, vegetarian and vegan options are becoming increasingly available, especially in larger cities and tourist destinations. Buddhist restaurants (????, ssh c?nt?ng) often offer meat-free versions of classic dishes, and plant-based ingredients like tofu, mushrooms, and seasonal vegetables are widely used in Chinese cooking.

Exploring the diverse and delicious world of Chinese cuisine is an essential part of any visit to China. From regional specialties and street food snacks to dining etiquette and cultural customs, the culinary landscape of China offers a rich tapestry of flavors, traditions, and experiences that are sure to delight and inspire visitors from around the world. Bon apptit!.

Related Videos

 

Featured Videos

A beautiful song – ‘Big Fish’  大鱼
From the awesome 2016 animated movie Big Fish and Begonia, directed by Liang Xuan and Zhang Chun, produced by Chinese studio B&T (Breath & Touch) in BeiJing - get it on DVD or at Netflix. An English language cover by AirahTea ... Writer : Zhou Shen 周深 海浪无声将夜幕深深淹没 The waves silently drown out the falling of night 漫过天尽头的角落 Drifting to the outermost corner of the sky 大鱼在梦境的缝隙里游过 The big fish swims amongst the nooks and crannies of a dream world 凝望你沉睡的轮廓 Gazing Longingly at your sleeping figure 看天一色听风起雨落 Look at the sea and sky, listen to the wind and rain 执子手吹散苍茫茫烟波 Grasping your hand, the vast mist slowly disperses 大鱼的翅膀已经太辽阔 But the wings of the fish are already too vast 我松开时间绳索 I have no choice but to release the rope of time 怕你飞远去 I'm afraid you'll fly away 怕你离我而去 Fly very far away from me 更怕你永远停留在这里 Even more than that, I'm afraid you'll never leave this place 每一滴泪水都向你流淌去 Every tear I shed always flows back to you 倒流进天空的海底 Flowing backwards in time from the sky to the sea 海浪无声将夜幕深深淹没 The waves silently drown out the falling of night 漫过天空尽头的角落 Drifting to the outermost corner of the sky 大鱼在梦境的缝隙里游过 The big fish swims amongst the nooks and crannies of a dream world 凝望你沉睡的轮廓 Gazing Longingly at your sleeping figure 看海天一色听风起雨落 Look at the sea and sky, listen to the wind and rain 执子手吹散苍茫茫烟波 Grasping your hand, the vast mist slowly disperses 大鱼的翅膀已经太辽阔 But the wings of the fish are already too vast 我松开时间的绳索 I have no choice but to release the rope of time 看你飞远去 I watch you fly away from me 看你离我而去 Fly very far away from me 原来你生来就属于天际 It seems you belong to the stars and the skies 每一滴泪水都向你流淌去 Every tear I shed always flows back to you 倒流回最初的相遇 Flowing back in time to the very first moment I saw you 倒流回最初的相遇 Flowing back in time to the very first moment I saw you AirahTea's translation : As the night begins, the sea takes quietly All the silent darkness of the sky. In my dream I see the fish swim gracefully, Gone as soon the sun begins to rise. Hear the rising wind. See the falling rain. Take my hand and I'll wash away the pain. Spread your wings, my dear. Don't be scared to grow. It is time for me to let you go. I am scared to see you fly far from me. But I fear even more if you stay here. All the pain I feel, every tear that I cry Flows reversed from the sea to the sky. As the night begins, the sea takes quietly All the silent darkness of the sky. In my dream I see the fish swim gracefully, Gone as soon the sun begins to rise. Hear the rising wind. See the falling rain. Take my hand and I'll wash away the pain. Spread your wings, my dear. Don't be scared to grow. It is time for me to let you go. As I see you fly, leaving me here behind. I could see, you were never mine to keep. All the pain I feel, every tear that I cry Flows reversed to when we said goodbye.
International Surfing Festival, HaiNan 海南 – video
RiYue Bay, WanNing, 2012.
The US empire, called ‘freedom and democracy’ – don’t miss it
With Richard Wolff and RJ Eskow ... Bonus film - with Garland Nixon ...
The beautiful ZhuJiaJiao 朱家角 Water Town, ShangHai
Awesome bridges in HuNan province
Breathtaking infrastructure. With Little Chinese Everywhere ...
Scenes of ancient China – HongCun 宏村
Filmed in July 2013. With Sticker Travel. First film shows the village of HongCun in AnHui province. Scenes from the film 'Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon' were filmed in HongCun, which is close to the south slope of Mount HuangShan and a UNESCO World Heritage site. The second film shows some places from WuYuan County, JiangXi province, including LiKeng village. Many of the well-preserved structures here date back to the Tang Dynasty, around 700 AD.
Traditional Chinese style oiled paper and bamboo umbrella
中国传统油纸伞
The truth about Chinese factory workers
YT comment : "I hope haters could put down their bias for a while, and try to understand how Chinese people value their families, value their communities, their societies, and understand the connection between these traits and the achievement that China has made." With 歪果仁研究协会 YChina / Raz Galor ... Bonus film (fun in GuangZhou) ...
Oriental Water City, DaLian, LiaoNing province
漫步滨城大连东方水城 With Gecko Walks ...

Tag search ?