From treating disease to promoting health – food is the best medicine

Dr. Mark Hyman & Dr. William Li.

"I never get tired of saying it: real food heals. Food has the power to prevent and reverse disease, and the more we know about it, the more power we have to curate a targeted diet to help us reach our health goals. The catch is that we have to choose the right foods, the ones that elevate us, and simultaneously ditch the poor-quality ones that harm us. There are powerful compounds in foods— like curcumin, genistein, catechins, lycopene, resveratrol, quercetin — that have medicinal impacts on the body. That’s why I call the grocery store the drug store; we can literally eat our medicine at every meal.

My guest this week on The Doctor’s Farmacy, Dr. William Li, is here to tell us all about eating to beat disease and making the idea that food is medicine second nature. You may also be surprised to find out that angiogenesis, or how the body forms blood vessels, is a common denominator in creating optimal health. William Li, MD, is a world-renowned physician, scientist, speaker, and author of Eat to Beat Disease: The New Science of How Your Body Can Heal Itself. He is best known for leading the Angiogenesis Foundation."

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Bonus film - Can we eat to starve cancer? (Angiogenesis) - Dr. William Li ...

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Bonus film 2 - more about diet and cancer - Dr. Mark Hyman talks with Dr. Jason Fung ...

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Bonus film 3 - on cognitive decline and the real causes - Dr. Mark Hyman talks with Dr. Dale Bredesen ...

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Bonus film 4 - GI health (IBS, etc.) plus the differences between standard and functional medicine - Dr. Hyman talks with Dr. Todd LePine ...

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Lastly (for now), Dr. William Li discusses the amazing power of plant nutrition and health ...

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