Beijing 北京 trip – places, food, fashion and more …

Mostly food ; )

The Forbidden City (Palace Museum) and more in this China travel and culture vlog.

A masterclass of video editing and use of music. A vlog that is 'show, don't tell'.

A trip around the sights and tastes of BeiJing, China.

With Dear Nessie (and Hannah) ...

[640],shadow=true,start=,stop=

Bonus film look-book ...

[320],shadow=true,start=,stop=
The Forbidden City, located in the heart of Beijing, China, is one of the most iconic and historically significant attractions in the country. Here's a guide for tourists visiting the Forbidden City:

History and Significance:
Imperial Palace: The Forbidden City served as the imperial palace and political center of China for nearly 500 years, from the Ming Dynasty (13681644) to the end of the Qing Dynasty (16441912). It was home to emperors and their households and served as the ceremonial and political center of Chinese government.

Architecture: The Forbidden City is renowned for its magnificent architectural design, featuring grand halls, pavilions, courtyards, and ceremonial gates. It exemplifies traditional Chinese palace architecture and design principles, with intricate decorations and symbolic elements.

Visiting the Forbidden City:
Layout: The Forbidden City is rectangular in shape and covers an area of about 180 acres. It is surrounded by a large moat and high walls, with four main gates: the Meridian Gate (south), the Gate of Divine Might (north), and the East and West Glorious Gates.

Highlights: Key attractions within the Forbidden City include the Hall of Supreme Harmony, the Hall of Central Harmony, the Hall of Preserving Harmony, the Palace of Heavenly Purity, the Palace of Earthly Tranquility, and the Imperial Garden. Each building has its own unique architectural style and historical significance.

Exhibitions: The Forbidden City houses an extensive collection of artifacts, artwork, and cultural relics from China's imperial past. Visitors can explore exhibitions showcasing imperial treasures, ceremonial objects, calligraphy, paintings, and ancient manuscripts.

Guided Tours: Guided tours are available for visitors who want to learn more about the history, architecture, and cultural significance of the Forbidden City. Audio guides in multiple languages are also available for self-guided tours.

Tips for Tourists:
Tickets and Entry: Tickets to the Forbidden City can be purchased at the entrance gates or online in advance to avoid long queues, especially during peak tourist seasons.

Opening Hours: The Forbidden City is open to visitors every day except Mondays. It is advisable to check the opening hours and plan your visit accordingly.

Comfortable Footwear: The Forbidden City is vast, and exploring its many halls and courtyards involves a fair amount of walking. Wear comfortable footwear and clothing suitable for walking and climbing stairs.

Respect the Rules: Follow the rules and regulations of the Forbidden City, such as no smoking, no littering, and no touching or climbing on the historic structures.

Photography: Photography is permitted in most areas of the Forbidden City, but some sections may have restrictions or require an additional photography permit. Respect any signage and guidelines regarding photography.

Cultural Insights:
Historical Significance: Take the time to learn about the history and significance of the Forbidden City, including its role in Chinese imperial history and its architectural symbolism.

Symbolism and Design: Pay attention to the architectural features, symbolism, and layout of the Forbidden City, which reflect Chinese cosmology, philosophy, and imperial authority.

Imperial Lifestyle: Explore the living quarters, ceremonial halls, and gardens to gain insights into the lifestyle, customs, and rituals of China's imperial rulers and their families.

Visiting the Forbidden City offers a fascinating glimpse into China's imperial past, with its grandeur, history, and cultural heritage preserved for visitors to explore and appreciate.

Beijing, the capital city of China, is a vibrant metropolis steeped in history, culture, and modernity. Here's a brief overview of what you can expect as a tourist in Beijing:

Historical Landmarks:
The Great Wall of China: One of the most iconic structures in the world, the Great Wall is easily accessible from Beijing. Mutianyu and Badaling sections are popular among tourists.

Forbidden City (Palace Museum): A UNESCO World Heritage Site, this vast imperial palace complex was home to Chinese emperors for over 500 years. It houses numerous halls, courtyards, and historical artifacts.

Temple of Heaven: A masterpiece of Chinese architecture, this ancient temple complex served as a place of worship for emperors to pray for good harvests.

Summer Palace: A stunning ensemble of lakes, gardens, and palaces, the Summer Palace served as a retreat for emperors during the Qing dynasty.

Tiananmen Square: One of the largest city squares in the world, Tiananmen Square is flanked by important landmarks such as the Monument to the People's Heroes, the Great Hall of the People, and the Mausoleum of Mao Zedong.

Cultural Sites:
Beijing Hutongs: Explore the narrow alleyways and traditional courtyard residences of Beijing's historic neighborhoods. You can take a rickshaw tour or simply wander around on foot.

Beijing Opera: Experience traditional Chinese opera performances at venues like the Liyuan Theater or the Chang'an Grand Theatre.

798 Art District: A hub of contemporary art and culture, this former industrial area is now home to numerous galleries, studios, and cafes.

Modern Attractions:
Olympic Park: Visit iconic structures such as the Bird's Nest (National Stadium) and the Water Cube (National Aquatics Center) from the 2008 Beijing Olympics.

CBD (Central Business District): Marvel at the futuristic skyline of Beijing's modern business district, which includes landmarks like the CCTV Headquarters and the China World Trade Center Tower III.

Culinary Delights:
Peking Duck: Indulge in Beijing's most famous dish, crispy roast duck served with pancakes, scallions, and hoisin sauce.

Street Food: Explore the city's vibrant street food scene and sample local delicacies like jianbing (savory crepes), lamb skewers, and dumplings.

Practical Tips:
Transportation: Beijing has an extensive public transportation system, including the subway, buses, and taxis. However, traffic can be heavy, so plan your travels accordingly.

Language: While English is not widely spoken, especially outside tourist areas, many signs and transportation announcements are in English. It's helpful to carry a translation app or a phrasebook.

Weather: Beijing experiences four distinct seasons, with hot summers and cold winters. The best times to visit are spring (April to June) and autumn (September to October) when the weather is mild and comfortable.

Etiquette: Respect local customs and traditions, such as removing your shoes before entering someone's home and using both hands to pass or receive items.

Beijing offers a rich tapestry of experiences for tourists, blending ancient heritage with modern innovations. Whether you're fascinated by history, culture, or culinary delights, there's something for everyone in this dynamic city.

Chinese cuisine is an intricate tapestry of flavors, techniques, and regional specialties that has evolved over thousands of years. From the fiery spices of Sichuan to the delicate dim sum of Cantonese cuisine, every region of China offers its own culinary delights. For visitors to China, exploring the diverse and dynamic world of Chinese food is an essential part of experiencing the country's rich cultural heritage. Here's a more extensive exploration of Chinese cuisine for visitors:

Regional Diversity:
Sichuan Cuisine: Hailing from the southwestern province of Sichuan, this cuisine is famed for its bold, spicy, and numbing flavors. Sichuan peppercorns, chili peppers, and aromatic spices are used liberally in dishes like Mapo Tofu, Dan Dan Noodles, and Sichuan Hot Pot, creating a symphony of flavors that tingles the taste buds.

Cantonese Cuisine: With its emphasis on fresh ingredients and delicate flavors, Cantonese cuisine is highly regarded for its seafood dishes, roasted meats, and dim sum. Steamed fish, Char Siu (barbecue pork), and Har Gow (shrimp dumplings) are just a few examples of the exquisite dishes that showcase Cantonese culinary mastery.

Shanghai Cuisine: Reflecting its coastal location and cosmopolitan history, Shanghai cuisine combines influences from Jiangsu, Zhejiang, and Anhui provinces. Sweet and Sour Mandarin Fish, Shanghai Soup Dumplings (Xiaolongbao), and Drunken Chicken are some of the signature dishes that highlight the diverse flavors and textures of this culinary tradition.

Beijing Cuisine: As the capital of China, Beijing boasts a rich culinary heritage deeply rooted in imperial traditions. Peking Duck, a dish with crispy skin and succulent meat served with pancakes and hoisin sauce, is a quintessential Beijing delicacy. Other notable dishes include Zhajiangmian (Beijing Noodles), Mongolian Hot Pot, and Beijing-style meat pies.

Hunan Cuisine: Known for its bold and aromatic flavors, Hunan cuisine features dishes that are spicy, sour, and intensely flavorful. Chairman Mao's Red-Braised Pork, Dong'an Chicken, and Steamed Fish Head with Chopped Chili exemplify the fiery and robust nature of Hunanese cooking, which makes ample use of chili peppers, garlic, and fermented ingredients.

Street Food and Snacks:
Jianbing: This savory Chinese crepe is a popular breakfast option, consisting of a thin pancake filled with eggs, scallions, cilantro, and various fillings such as crispy fried dough, pickled vegetables, or chili sauce.

Baozi: These steamed buns are filled with a variety of savory or sweet fillings, including pork, vegetables, or red bean paste. Baozi are a popular street food snack and can be found in teahouses, markets, and street stalls across China.

Roujiamo: Often referred to as Chinese Hamburgers, roujiamo features savory braised meat stuffed inside a flatbread, offering a hearty and flavorful snack that's perfect for on-the-go eating.

Dining Etiquette and Customs:
Family-Style Dining: Chinese meals are typically served family-style, with multiple dishes shared among diners seated around a table. It's customary to use chopsticks to pick up food from communal dishes and to serve elders before oneself.

Toasting and Ganbei: When dining with Chinese hosts, expect toasts (ganbei) with alcohol, usually baijiu (Chinese liquor). It's polite to reciprocate the toast and drink in moderation, but declining politely is acceptable if you don't drink alcohol.

Tea Culture: Tea is an integral part of Chinese dining culture, with a wide variety of teas available to complement different dishes. Green tea, oolong tea, and pu'er tea are among the most popular choices, and serving tea to guests is a sign of hospitality and respect.

Street Markets and Night Markets:
Wangfujing Snack Street, Beijing: Located near the Forbidden City, this bustling street market offers a wide variety of traditional snacks, street food, and local delicacies. Visitors can sample everything from scorpions on a stick to traditional Beijing snacks like Jianbing and Tanghulu (candied fruit skewers).

Shanghai Old Street, Shanghai: Nestled in the heart of the city's historic district, Shanghai Old Street is a bustling marketplace where visitors can explore narrow alleyways lined with traditional shops, street vendors, and food stalls. From steamed dumplings and stinky tofu to hand-pulled noodles and sugar-coated haws, there's something to satisfy every craving.

Dietary Considerations:
Vegetarian and Vegan Options: While Chinese cuisine traditionally features a wide range of meats and animal products, vegetarian and vegan options are becoming increasingly available, especially in larger cities and tourist destinations. Buddhist restaurants (????, ssh c?nt?ng) often offer meat-free versions of classic dishes, and plant-based ingredients like tofu, mushrooms, and seasonal vegetables are widely used in Chinese cooking.

Exploring the diverse and delicious world of Chinese cuisine is an essential part of any visit to China. From regional specialties and street food snacks to dining etiquette and cultural customs, the culinary landscape of China offers a rich tapestry of flavors, traditions, and experiences that are sure to delight and inspire visitors from around the world. Bon apptit!.

Related Videos

 

Featured Videos

MoChou Lake park, XuanWu Lake park and JiMing Temple, NanJing
JiangSu province. With China Walking Tour ... Bonus films - daytime and evening cycle tour ... Bonus film - with FunFancie - great attractions in NanJing ...
Around ShanDong 山东 province
With Sticker Travel ...
A trip to ZhangJiaJie 张家界, HuNan province
A beautiful National Forest park and renowned scenic area. Includes the world's longest cable car ride (7 km), up through the clouds ...
China to Laos high speed rail link – win-win with the BRI
With The New Atlas ... Bonus films ...
Beautiful BeiJing in the snow
Including the Forbidden City, the Great Wall of China and JingShan Park. With Seiu Travel ...
Impression LiJiang 印象丽江 – the open-air musical
Impression LiJiang is a one hour, open-air musical based on local folklore and song, directed by famed film director Zhang YiMou, with Wang ChaoGe and Fan Yue. Featuring a cast of over 500 performers, it is staged in front of the Jade Dragon Snow Mountain in YunNan province. The most famous music item is the Naxi song 'Return Home'.
The BeiJing to DaXing airport express metro line
With Walk For You ...
Rice noodles 米粉面条, from scratch …
Mǐfěn Miàn. A staple of YunNan 'small eats' 小吃 (XiǎoChī) street food dishes. With DianXi XiaoGe #滇西小哥 ...
The amazing growth of China’s high-speed rail network
YT comment : dominique ridoux : True story: I once visited a couple of friends in their flat in downtown Shanghai city. When I arrived the whole street was under construction, the road, the side walks, everything... We had lunch, played mahjong, then dinner. When I went out after the evening dinner, the street was completely finished! New asphalt, sidewalks paved and new trees planted all the way. I even went back thinking my friend's building had 2 entrances... The big difference with us in Europe is when a decision is made the do some infrastructure work, they will put as many workers as needed to do it very quickly, they cannot afford to have streets blocked for weeks in a city of 23 million people like Shanghai. In China everything is about efficiency because they have no other choice. Can you afford to queue for tickets and so on in a city of 23 millions? No! Ok, let's all use Wechat and Alipay to increase efficiency... Done in a few years! Almost nobody is using cash anymore in China! They apply the same mindset to everyday activity, may it be transportation, food industry or even paying your taxes! The result is (as far as I am concerned) a full body check (including check in, CT scan, blood work etc) in less than 2 hours including a complementary breakfast for less than 400 Euros. Or Visa application done in 20 minutes. All car parkings are using plate recognition technology decreasing time wasting again and again. High speed train are efficient, can move large amounts of people at a fantastic pace. Also as mentioned by many people, they build "hubs", you get out of the train and you have 2 or even 3 subway lines to bring you to your final destination, more and more you even have the airport hub at a walking distance! We have a similar hub in Paris (CDG with RER and TGV within the airport walking distance) but the size of it in Shanghai makes it spectacular! YT comment : rhn94 China spent 1 Trillion USD over 10-15 years building this network, that is 1/4th the cost of the Iraq War the US paid. YT comment : Pal Sih China is building their country. USA is destroying other countries. YT comment : thata xx The best part of China's high speed train is you can order food from any of the restaurants in the station on your phone and designate at what time during which stop to have it delivered to you. During the 2-3 minutes stop, your food is already there waiting to be distributed to you on the train. I miss it so much.

Tag search ?