The temples and beauty of FanJingShan 梵净山, GuiZhou

FanJingShan is the highest peak of the WuLing Mountains in southwestern China, at an elevation of 2,570 meters (8,430 feet). The FanJingShan National Nature Reserve was established in 1978 and designated a UNESCO Biosphere Reserve in 1986. FanJingShan is a sacred mountain in Chinese Buddhism. It became a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 2018.

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GuiZhou map

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With Cyrus Janssen ... Comment by Gustavo Andrés ... There is an overwhelming assumption in the West that China’s Achilles heel is the state: that it lacks legitimacy. This is the underlying reason why Westerners believe that China’s transformation is unsustainable: that the political system cannot survive. It would be wrong to suggest that attitudes have not shifted: the endurance of the reform period, now over 35 years old, and the scale of its achievement have bred a growing if still grudging respect, and a less apocalyptic view of Chinese political change. Few now regard it to be imminent and many have extended their time horizons somewhat into the future. Nevertheless, most Westerners still regard China’s present political order as lacking legitimacy and as ultimately unsustainable. 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