Coming together – the Chinese New Year 中国新年 2017

Also known as the Spring Festival, the Chinese New Year starts on Saturday 28th January this year and on the mainland lasts one week. This year, based on a lunar calendar, will be the Year of the Rooster.

Preparations will already be under way and include a spring clean and adding festive decorations. New Year's Eve and New Year's Day are a time for family reunions, and for many this means travelling home from the city to the countryside.

Chinese New Year is celebrated in many countries and China-towns around the World.

GōngXǐ FāCái 恭喜发财 !

The first film, 'Coming Together', is from Malaysia - enjoy ...

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The Spring Festival is about a new year, a new beginning. A time of renewal, and hope and a fresh start, a time of good-will.

For example, fireworks, apart from being a joy to all, are to scare away bad spirits. One can see this symbolize the breaking of old habits of thought – a spring clean of the mind.

A new year is a new chance for a better life – if you will take it. Keep your eyes open, heart abundant, and strive for a better world. Help others on their journey whenever you can and always share a smile. It may help another, but it will certainly be good for you.

As the second film says, it is love that brings us closer to happiness.

Above all, the Spring Festival is a time for family.

Next 4 films :

1: 'Going Home' ...

2: A touching song about life and friendship (forget the sub-titles, just watch the video). 'Beautiful Snow County is my Home' ...

3: 'Family Portrait' (from Malaysia) - a wry look at family life in the digital age ...

4: 'Don't be tied to the past, but don't tear it up' ...

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Two 2017 CNY songs from the M Girls (Malaysia). They have released a CNY album every year since 2001 ...

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2011 flash-back - CNY fireworks in BeiJing ...

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Lion Dance in Malaysia (2017) ...

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