GuangZhou 广州, ShangHai 上海 and ShenZhen 深圳 in beautiful time-lapse

A film by Pryadko Artem and Shishkovski Dmitry

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Shanghai is one of China's most dynamic and cosmopolitan cities, blending a rich history with modern skyscrapers and vibrant culture. Here's what you need to know as a tourist visiting Shanghai:

Historical and Cultural Landmarks:
The Bund: This iconic waterfront promenade along the Huangpu River features colonial-era buildings on one side and futuristic skyscrapers on the other, offering stunning views of Shanghai's skyline.

Yu Garden: Dating back to the Ming dynasty, Yu Garden is a classical Chinese garden with pavilions, ponds, and rockeries. The nearby Yu Garden Bazaar is a great place to shop for souvenirs and traditional crafts.

Shanghai Museum: Home to an extensive collection of Chinese art and artifacts, including bronzes, ceramics, paintings, and calligraphy, the Shanghai Museum is a must-visit for history and art enthusiasts.

Jing'an Temple: One of Shanghai's most famous Buddhist temples, Jing'an Temple is known for its beautiful architecture, peaceful atmosphere, and towering golden Buddha statue.

Modern Attractions:
Shanghai Tower: Ascend to the observation deck of this iconic skyscraper, the tallest in China and the second-tallest in the world, for panoramic views of the city.

The Oriental Pearl TV Tower: Another iconic landmark, this futuristic tower offers observation decks, a glass-bottomed skywalk, and a revolving restaurant.

Shanghai Disneyland: Located in the Pudong district, Shanghai Disneyland offers a magical experience for visitors of all ages with its themed lands, attractions, and entertainment.

Shopping and Entertainment:
Nanjing Road: One of the world's busiest shopping streets, Nanjing Road is lined with department stores, boutiques, and restaurants. Don't miss the nearby pedestrian-friendly Nanjing Road East, known for its lively atmosphere and street performers.

Xintiandi: This upscale shopping, dining, and entertainment district features a mix of traditional Shikumen-style buildings and modern amenities, making it a popular destination for locals and tourists alike.

French Concession: Explore this historic neighborhood known for its tree-lined streets, charming cafes, boutiques, and art galleries.

Culinary Delights:
Shanghai Cuisine: Sample local specialties such as xiaolongbao (soup dumplings), shengjianbao (pan-fried dumplings), and Shanghai-style noodles.

Street Food: Wander through the city's bustling food markets and snack streets to taste a variety of street foods, from savory pancakes to grilled skewers.

Practical Tips:
Transportation: Shanghai has an efficient public transportation system, including the subway, buses, and taxis. Consider purchasing a rechargeable transportation card for convenience.

Language: While Mandarin is the official language, English is widely spoken in tourist areas, hotels, and restaurants.

Weather: Shanghai experiences four distinct seasons, with hot, humid summers and chilly winters. The best times to visit are spring (March to May) and autumn (September to November) when the weather is mild and comfortable.

Etiquette: Respect local customs and traditions, such as using polite language and avoiding loud behavior in public places.

Shanghai offers a captivating blend of old and new, with its historic landmarks, modern skyscrapers, vibrant culture, and delectable cuisine. Whether you're interested in history, architecture, shopping, or dining, Shanghai has something to offer every type of visitor.

Guangzhou, formerly known as Canton, is a dynamic metropolis located in southern China, serving as the capital of Guangdong Province. As one of China's oldest and largest cities, Guangzhou boasts a rich history, vibrant culture, and modern urban amenities. Here's a guide for tourists visiting Guangzhou:

Historical and Cultural Significance:
Historic Trading Hub: Guangzhou has a long history as a major trading port and commercial center, dating back over 2,000 years. It played a crucial role in the ancient Maritime Silk Road, facilitating trade and cultural exchange between China and other parts of the world.

Cultural Diversity: As a melting pot of cultures, Guangzhou has a diverse population, influenced by various ethnic groups and foreign traders throughout history. This cultural diversity is reflected in the city's cuisine, architecture, and traditions.

Top Attractions:
Canton Tower: As one of the tallest structures in China, the Canton Tower is an iconic landmark and a symbol of Guangzhou's modernity. Visitors can ascend the tower for panoramic views of the cityscape, dine in rotating restaurants, and experience thrilling attractions like the Sky Drop and Bubble Tram.

Yuexiu Park: This expansive park in the heart of Guangzhou is home to several attractions, including the iconic Five-Ram Statue, Zhenhai Tower, and the Guangzhou Museum. Visitors can stroll through lush gardens, admire ancient artifacts, and enjoy recreational activities like boating and tai chi.

Chen Clan Academy: Built during the Qing Dynasty, the Chen Clan Ancestral Hall (also known as the Chen Clan Academy) is a masterpiece of Lingnan architecture. It houses a vast collection of traditional art, wood carvings, and ancestral tablets, offering insights into the region's cultural heritage.

Shamian Island: Located along the Pearl River, Shamian Island is a tranquil oasis with tree-lined streets, colonial-era buildings, and charming cafes. Visitors can wander through the island's historic neighborhoods, admire European-style architecture, and relax by the waterfront.

Guangzhou Opera House: Designed by renowned architect Zaha Hadid, the Guangzhou Opera House is a striking architectural masterpiece that hosts world-class performances and cultural events. Visitors can attend opera, ballet, concerts, and other artistic performances in a stunning modern setting.

Culinary Delights:
Cantonese Cuisine: Guangzhou is famous for its delicious Cantonese cuisine, characterized by fresh seafood, dim sum, roast meats, and flavorful stir-fries. Visitors can sample authentic dishes at local restaurants, street food stalls, and traditional teahouses throughout the city.

Qingping Market: Explore Qingping Market, one of Guangzhou's oldest and largest markets, to experience the vibrant atmosphere and diverse array of local specialties. From exotic fruits and spices to live seafood and herbal remedies, the market offers a sensory feast for visitors.

Practical Tips:
Transportation: Getting around Guangzhou is convenient with its extensive public transportation system, including buses, taxis, and the Guangzhou Metro. The city's efficient transportation network makes it easy to navigate between attractions and neighborhoods.

Language: Mandarin Chinese is the official language spoken in Guangzhou, although Cantonese is also widely spoken by locals. English may not be widely understood, especially in more remote areas, so it's helpful to carry a phrasebook or translation app.

Weather: Guangzhou has a subtropical climate with hot, humid summers and mild winters. The best time to visit is during the cooler months from October to March when the weather is more comfortable for outdoor activities.

Currency: The currency used in China is the Chinese Yuan (CNY). Credit cards are widely accepted at hotels, restaurants, and shops in urban areas, but it's advisable to carry cash for small purchases and transactions.

Guangzhou offers a fascinating blend of ancient history, modernity, and cultural diversity, making it an enchanting destination for tourists seeking to explore the treasures of southern China. Whether marveling at iconic landmarks, savoring Cantonese cuisine, or immersing oneself in the city's vibrant culture, Guangzhou has something to offer for every traveler.

Shenzhen is a modern metropolis located in Guangdong Province, bordering Hong Kong to the south. Known as China's first Special Economic Zone, Shenzhen has transformed from a fishing village into a bustling city known for its innovation, technology, and vibrant culture. Here's what you need to know as a tourist visiting Shenzhen:

Modern Landmarks and Skyscrapers:
Shenzhen Bay Park: This expansive waterfront park offers stunning views of Shenzhen's skyline and the Hong Kong skyline across the bay. It's a popular spot for leisurely strolls, cycling, and picnics.

Shenzhen Civic Center: Admire the futuristic architecture of the Shenzhen Civic Center, which includes landmarks such as the Shenzhen Concert Hall, Shenzhen Library, and Shenzhen Museum.

Ping An Finance Centre: Marvel at one of the tallest skyscrapers in China and the fourth-tallest in the world, featuring an observation deck on the 116th floor offering panoramic views of the city.

Theme Parks and Entertainment:
Window of the World: Explore miniature replicas of famous landmarks from around the world, including the Eiffel Tower, the Taj Mahal, and the Great Wall of China, all in one place.

Happy Valley: This amusement park offers thrilling rides, live entertainment, and themed areas catering to visitors of all ages, making it a popular destination for families and thrill-seekers.

Shopping and Dining:
Huaqiangbei Electronics Market: Known as the world's largest electronics market, Huaqiangbei is a paradise for tech enthusiasts, offering everything from gadgets and components to accessories and repairs.

Coco Park: This upscale shopping and dining district features a wide range of boutiques, department stores, restaurants, bars, and cafes, catering to both locals and tourists.

Cultural and Historical Sites:
Dafen Oil Painting Village: Explore this vibrant artist community known for its reproduction oil paintings, where you can watch artists at work and purchase artworks at affordable prices.

Fairy Lake Botanical Garden: Escape the urban hustle and bustle at this expansive botanical garden, featuring lush greenery, scenic walking trails, and a diverse collection of plants and flowers.

Practical Tips:
Transportation: Shenzhen has a well-developed public transportation system, including the metro, buses, and taxis. The metro is the most convenient way to get around the city, with signs and announcements in both Chinese and English.

Language: Mandarin is the official language, but Cantonese and English are also widely spoken, especially in tourist areas, hotels, and restaurants.

Weather: Shenzhen has a subtropical climate with mild, dry winters and hot, humid summers. The best times to visit are spring (March to May) and autumn (September to November) when the weather is pleasant and comfortable.

Visa: Depending on your nationality, you may need a visa to enter China. Check the latest visa requirements and apply in advance if necessary.

Shenzhen offers a dynamic mix of modern attractions, cultural experiences, and shopping opportunities, making it an exciting destination for tourists seeking a taste of urban life in China. Whether you're interested in technology, entertainment, or simply exploring a vibrant city, Shenzhen has something for everyone.

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