Videos about investment, China

China takes the lead in clean energy


China overtook the US during 2009 to become the leading investor in renewable energy technologies, according to a new analysis.


Researchers with the Pew Charitable Trusts calculate that China invested $34.6bn (£23.2bn) in clean energy over the year, almost double the US figure.


China's target of having 30GW of installed renewable capacity in place by 2020 will soon be exceeded through wind alone, and new targets are in the process of being set.


[China is now the world's leading manufacturer of solar cells and wind turbines.]


http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/sci/tech/8587319.stm

       
   

The new super-fast train from Wuhan to GuangZhou

The new Wuhan-Guangzhou train service travels at an average speed of 217 miles per hour and covers the 660 miles between Wuhan and Guangzhou in just three hours. The journey previously took almost 11 hours.

The Harmony Express is just the first step of an epic £480 billion project to build nearly 19,000 miles of new railways in the next five years, 8,000 miles of which will be tracks for high-speed trains. The high speed train routes to be rolled out during this Year of the Tiger, and in the two years that follow, will dramatically shrink the country, spreading economic development to the countryside.

Aboard the Harmony Express, and at Wuhan's brand new £1.5 billion French-designed railway station, everything is spotless.

For some, it is one of the most visible signs of how far China has come. By 2012 the train, which runs from the central hub of Wuhan to the capital of China's manufacturing, Guangzhou, will extend all the way to Beijing, allowing passengers to zip from one end of China to the other in under eight hours.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/asia/china/7230137/China-steams-ahead-with-worlds-fastest-train.html

The new trains leave 29 times a day for Wuhan from a gargantuan train station on the outskirts of Guangzhou that opened on Jan. 30. With soaring steel girders, white walls and enormous skylights far overhead, the station, Asia’s largest, resembles a major airport.

The Wuhan-Guangzhou line cost $17 billion (116.6 billion renminbi); it has so many tunnels through mountains that at times it feels like a subway.

By 2012 China will have 3,000 miles of 215mph track (freeing normal rails for freight), whereas the US will have 84 miles of 186mph track, by 2014.

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/02/13/business/global/13rail.html?pagewanted=1

       
   

Adjusting economic development

[At the recent Davos meeting] China’s feisty new-generation leader (and premier-in-waiting), Vice-Premier Li Keqiang, declared, “we must change the old way of inefficient growth and transform the current development model that is excessively reliant on investment and exports.”  Beijing is getting serious about boosting internal consumption.


Li announced, “We will focus on boosting domestic demand.” Coming from Washington such words would inspire a yawn. Coming from the future leader of China, the word “transform” demands attention.


Beijing has the resources and power to transform its economy. We’ve seen proof of that in the past year.


Li listed a number of initiatives including a stronger health care safety net and to subsidizing rural poor to buy household appliances. As Li sees it, “The growth in domestic consumption in China will not only drive growth in China but also provide greater markets for the world.” That’s encouraging news for global companies who wish to sell to an increasingly wealthy Chinese consumer, and for Chinese firms looking to expand internally.


http://www.stockmarketsreview.com/news/pay_attention_to_china_s_new_growth_model_20100204_2779/

       
   
   

China’s economic prospects

The similarities between China today and Japan in the 1980s may look ominous. But China’s boom is unlikely to give way to prolonged slump.


CHINA rebounded more swiftly from the global downturn than any other big economy, thanks largely to its enormous monetary and fiscal stimulus. In the year to the fourth quarter of 2009, its real GDP is estimated to have grown by more than 10%. But many sceptics claim that its recovery is built on wobbly foundations. Indeed, they say, China now looks ominously like Japan in the late 1980s before its bubble burst and two lost decades of sluggish growth began. Worse, were China to falter now, while the recovery in rich countries is still fragile, it would be a severe blow not just at home but to the whole of the world economy.


[...] Scary stuff. However, a close inspection of pessimists’ three main concerns—overvalued asset prices, overinvestment and excessive bank lending—suggests that China’s economy is more robust than they think.


http://www.economist.com/world/asia/displaystory.cfm?story_id=15270708


It is worth reading the comments too.

       
   

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