Videos about caves, China

YunGang Caves, Hanging Temple, YingXian Pagoda, HengShan, Datong

Videographer : marcobandi

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YunGang Caves

The YunGang Grottoes, one of the three major cave clusters in China, punctuate the southern foot of the north face of WuZhou Mountain, in the ShiLi River valley, 16 km west of Datong City. The worked area extends about 1 km (0.7 miles) from east to west. There are 252 caves of various sizes and over 50,000 stone statues.

The Caves are divided into east, middle, and west parts. Pagodas dominate the eastern parts; west caves are small and mid-sized with niches. Caves in the middle are made up of front and back chambers with Buddha statues in the center. Embossing covers walls and ceilings.

Started in 450, YunGang Caves are a relic of the Northern Wei Dynasty (386-534). Absorbing Indian Gandhara Buddhist art, Yungang sculptures developed traditional Chinese art blended with contemporary social features.

The Hanging Temple at Mount HengShan

The Hanging Monastery (XuanKong Si) is one of the most dramatic sights at HengShan - a wooden temple clinging to the cliff side about 75 meters (250 feet) above ground, appearing to defy gravity with only a few wooden posts as support. The Hanging Monastery, constructed from 491, has survived more than 1,500 years. The extant monastery was largely rebuilt during the Ming (1368–1644) and Qing (1644–1911) dynasties and last restored in 1900. There are 40 wooden halls and structures linked by an ingenious system of pillars, posts and walkways.

HengShan lies in HunYuan County, ShanXi province. The closest city is Datong, 65 kilometers to the northwest. Although HengShan is one of the five sacred Taoist mountains of China, the temples and grottoes at this part of the mountain are all Buddhist, though with some Taoist, and Confucian influences.

Along with the YunGang Grottoes, the Hanging Temple is one of the main tourist attractions and historical sites in the Datong area. Built more than 1,500 years ago, this temple is notable not only for its location on a sheer precipice but also because it includes Buddhist, Taoist, and Confucian elements. The structure is kept in place with wooden crossbeams fitted into holes chiseled into the cliffs; the main supportive structure is ingeniously hidden.

According to legend, construction of the temple started at the end of the Northern Wei dynasty by only one man, a monk named Liao Ran. Over a history of more than 1,500 years, many repairs and extensions have led to its present-day scale.

YingXian Pagoda

In the center of the small town, 75 kilometers south of Datong, stands the stately YingXian Pagoda, one of the oldest wooden buildings in China. Constructed in 1056 during the Liao dynasty, the octagonal pagoda, towers nearly 70m high in nine stories; an early masterpiece of structual engineering.

       
   

The Silver Cave 银子岩 near YangShuo, GuangXi province

The Silver Cave (YinZi) is one of the most beautiful in China.


This large cave system in the limestone karst mountains has an underground river, waterfalls and plenty of amazing stalagmites and stalagtites.


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JiuXiang Caves Scenic Area 九乡风景区, YunNan province

JiuXiang Scenic Area lies about 70 kilometres from KunMing and 47 km from the town of YiLiang.
In JiuXiang, rivers and streams criss-cross karst hills and mountains.


There are more than one hundred caves here that form one of the largest cave groups in China. The stalactites in the caves take on many forms in different colours. Found in the caves are numerous natural bridges, valleys, steams and waterfalls, which constitute a wonderful subterranean world.


With a total area of about 200 square kilometres, JiuXiang consists of five smaller scenic areas.


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A trip to JiaYuGuan 嘉峪关, western end of the Great Wall

JiaYuGuan is the first pass at the western end of the Great Wall of China.

It lies 6 kilometers southwest of the city of JiaYuGuan in GanSu province. The fortress lies between two hills and near to an oasis that was then on the western edge of China.

According to legend, when JiaYuGuan was being planned, the official in charge asked the designer to estimate the number of bricks required; the designer surprised the official by giving him an exact number. The official questioned his judgment, asking him if he was sure that would be enough, so the designer added one brick to the total. When JiaYuGuan was finished, there was one brick left over, which was placed loose on one of the gates, where it remains today.

Nearby are the DunHuang Caves (also known as the MoGau Caves); these grottoes date from the 4th century AD and contain Buddhist art from over the next thousand years.

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Four days in YangShuo and GuiLin, GuangXi province

Riding mopeds, boating on the Li River, rice terraces and caves ...


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Silk Road travels, including JiaYuGuan and DunHuang - video

Scenes along the Silk Road in China. Places include Hohhot (Inner Mongolia), YinChuan (NingXia), LanZhou (Gansu), TianShui (Gansu), ZhangYe (Gansu), JiaYuGuan (Gansu), DunHuang (Gansu), Urumqi (XinJiang). Most notably, the western end of the Great Wall at JiaYuGuan and the Grottoes at DunHuang.

ZhangJiaJie 张家界, WuLing Nature Reserve, HuNan province

Explore China's largest nature forest reserve with CCTV's Travelogue ...

A trip to the YunGang Grottoes 云冈石窟, DaTong, ShanXi province

Over 50,000 Buddhist statues are to be found in the caves here, ranging from just 3cm in height to 20m.

A guide to YangShuo 阳朔 - Travelogue

YangShuo, Guilin county, GuangXi province, is one of China's most beautiful travel destinations. These films nclude the Li River cruise, fan painting, ethnic crafts, wonderful caves, rock climbing and nightlife. Explore YangShuo with CCTV's Travelogue ...

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